JD/MSFS (International Law Core)

LAW 888 v00 Advanced International Commercial Arbitration: Practice Seminar

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

The seminar will be a combination of the theoretical and practical aspects of international commercial arbitration, with an emphasis on the practical. Its centerpiece will be the handling of a mock international arbitration case from the drafting of the arbitration agreement to the drafting of a final award, with units in between on the appointment and challenge of arbitrators, discovery of documents, and a live arbitration hearing. Teams of students will participate (as counsel to the parties) in the negotiation of arbitration agreements, in the drafting of motions and replies, in oral argument on such issues as the disqualification of arbitrators and the production of documents in discovery, in the hearing in a case, and in brief writing. Playing the role of arbitrators, students will also write final arbitral awards.


To the extent time permits, the course will also consider a handful of the many difficult and, to a large extent, still unanswered questions of national and international law that are emerging as the practice of international arbitration expands, including choice of law issues and, particularly in the United States, issues of the relation between federal and state laws.

The course will be limited to 12 students. It will meet once a week for two hours. There will be no final exam.

Prerequisite: A general course in international commercial arbitration. Students not having this precise prerequisite but having had a course in arbitration generally or substantial law practice experience in arbitration may apply for admission to the course by emailing Professor Joelson at joelsonmr@msn.com.

Mutually Excluded Courses: This course is mutually exclusive with the other spring course by this same name (LAWG 2073).

Note: This course does not meet the J.D. writing requirement (WR).

LAW 483 v01 Advanced Issues in International Human Rights Seminar

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course will examine specific issues in international human rights law drawn from the current decisions of international human rights supervisory bodies. The course will be divided into two halves. The first half of the course will consist of lectures and discussions on seven specific issues as illustrated by cases decided by international jurisdictional bodies. For example, we will examine the decisions of the International Court of Justice (Breard, LaGrand) and the Advisory Opinion of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights (OC-16) on an alien’s right to consular assistance, in the context of the creation of international human rights norms and the problems arising from a multiplicity of international jurisdictions. We will examine the two decisions (Section and Grand Chamber) of the European Court of Human Rights on the Refah Partisi case as regards the compatibility of Islam and democracy in the context of the universality of human rights debate. We will examine decisions of the European Commission and Court of Human Rights and the Inter-American Commission in an attempt to trace the changing definition of “torture” in the context of the Guantanamo detainees case. The second half of the course will be dedicated to the oral presentation of research papers and discussion of these paper topics.

Prerequisite: International Law I (or an equivalent course in Public International Law).

Recommended: A survey class in Human Rights Law.

LAW 885 v00 Advocacy in International Arbitration

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course blends mock litigation experiences with class discussion of techniques, strategy, and ethics in international arbitration proceedings. Students directly participate in a series of practical exercises based upon proceedings brought by a foreign investor against a State before the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), including role-playing as litigators and arbitrators. The course emphasizes advocacy in connection with jurisdictional and procedural issues, selecting and challenging arbitrators, limits on the enforceability of awards, and other litigation problems that arise in the globalized environment of international investment and arbitration. There will be a number of oral advocacy assignments throughout the semester. The course grade will be a function of those assignments and class participation.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law

Note: Students participate in in-class exercises and are graded on those exercises and productive class participation. Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 030 v00 Asian Law and Policy Studies Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This is a research seminar in which students will present their current research on Asian law and policy at the end of seminar classes where we consider the various areas of law and development which have led to the economic dynamism of the Asia-Pacific region. The impact of the Asia-Pacific region on the world market and global economic activity is substantial and continues to grow. In addition, the conspicuous success and some spectacular failures of Asian nations in legal and economic development have prompted suggestions that the experience of these nations may provide models (both positive and negative) for other developing countries and regions. The seminar will explore--in connection with the role of law and legal institutions--the interaction of social change, economic growth, and legal development in East and Southeast Asia. Specific topics will depend on the research interests of the participants, but will include capital formation, financial regulation, transnational trade and investment, intellectual property, land reform, environmental protection, worker protection, human rights, and similar private and public law issues. The first few classes will introduce elements of development economics relevant to law and development.


Each student will also prepare a substantial academic work of publishable quality and present a 20-30 minute precis of it to the seminar. The student papers are expected to meet or preferably to exceed the requirements of the typical research paper in scope, depth, and quality. Guest speakers may present some classes separately or together with the instructor.

Recommended: Comparative Law (or the equivalent Comparative Law: Legal Systems in Transition) or any course in Asian law.

LAW 050 v00 Aviation Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course encompasses most aspects of air transportation, including airport and air traffic control liability, air carrier liability in the carriage of passengers and cargo domestically as well as internationally under the Montreal Convention and economic and safety regulation of domestic and international air transportation. The course also includes contributions by practitioners in the field.

LAW 050 v01 Aviation Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The course, taught by practitioners in the field, covers contemporary and cutting-edge aviation topics such as international commercial aviation, aviation security, and the integration of unmanned aircraft systems (i.e., drones) into the national airspace. The course material will encompass most aspects of aviation law, including the law of international civil aviation, the economic and safety regulation of air transportation, aircraft registration and certification, aircraft accidents, airport law, government immunity from tort liability, and airline liability for the carriage of passengers and cargo domestically and internationally under the Montreal Convention. Students are exposed to a range of materials, including cases, treaties, executive agreements, and regulations, with a view towards imparting practical skills that can be applied to any field of law.

LAW 1175 v01 Borders and Banishment Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

This course explores practices of border fortification, incarceration, criminal law enforcement, and immigration policing. Migration and incarceration—borders and banishment—present some of the most pressing legal and moral controversies in contemporary public life. Over the past two decades, criminal-immigration matters have become the most commonly prosecuted federal crimes; populations in prison, jail and immigration detention have dramatically increased; and though major proposed immigration reforms are stymied in Congress, pressures for reform in both the immigration and criminal contexts continue to mount.

The course will begin by considering the historical, social psychological, and legal foundations of border fortification and banishment practices. Then, attention will turn to some of the crises that pervade border enforcement, policing, and incarceration settings—from the presence of millions of people in the United States without legal status, to the explosion in criminal and immigration detention, police violence, and the widespread problem of sexual assault and prison rape. Reformist alternatives to the status quo in immigration and criminal legal processes will be considered, including through examination of social movement projects, prisoner advocacy, and public interest practice settings focused on relevant reform. Course readings and discussion will center on proposed criminal and immigration law reform and more far-reaching alternatives to borders and banishment. The course will conclude by investigating various abolitionist efforts to think and work beyond borders and banishment. Students will reflect in class and in writing on the various components of the course in relation to their own interests.

There are no prerequisites. All students are welcome.

Recommended: Criminal Justice (or Democracy and Coercion), Criminal Law, Immigration Law.

Note: THIS COURSE REQUIRES PROFESSOR PERMISSION TO ENROLL. Please email Professor Allegra McLeod (mcleod@law.georgetown.edu) and Karly Mitchell (km1602@law.georgetown.edu) by 5:00 pm on Wednesday, June 9, 2021 expressing your interest in taking the seminar. Please include whether you want to take the course for 2 or 3 credits.

FIRST AND SECOND CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3 credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 370 v02 Business and Human Rights in the Global Economy

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Corporations today have a global scale as well as an impact that matches or sometimes exceeds that of governments. Their activities -- from sourcing of raw materials, to processing and production of intermediate or finished goods, to distribution and sale -- have major consequences not only for the human rights of their employees but also for the rights of the individuals and communities impacted by their operations. In many countries, government regulation and oversight are either absent or largely ineffective. Companies in turn struggle to define their responsibilities in the face of these "governance gaps" -- particularly where requirements under national law fall short of international standards in areas such as hours of work and safety and healthy.

A robust and often contentious debate over these issues culminated in the development of the U.N. Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (the “UNGPs”) under the leadership of Special Representative John Ruggie. These Principles establish a framework for considering the respective roles of governments and corporations and outline core concepts of human rights due diligence and effective remedy. In doing so, the UNGPs also inform and to some extent refocus efforts that have emerged over the past 20 years to address these governance gaps and have brought together stakeholders from business, labor, civil society, the investment community, and academia.

At the same time, in recent years there has been an increased push from civil society groups and certain governments to go beyond these "voluntary" efforts and develop a binding business and human rights treaty mechanism; this has met with strong opposition from business and many other governments, including the United States.

Even as "non-regulatory" approaches remain the predominant means of addressing various business and human rights challenges, there also has been a growing focus in recent years on tools through which national governments and international institutions could exercise greater leverage. This includes advocacy for stronger labor and other human rights language in trade agreements, one-way trade preference programs, procurement standards, and the rules and guidelines applied by international financial institutions -- coupled with more aggressive enforcement of those criteria. Expanded efforts to advance that "regulatory" approach in trade policy and elsewhere in some cases has been met with resistance from governments and business, but there also have been examples of emerging consensus among a diverse range of stakeholders.

This course introduces students to this quickly-evolving business and human rights landscape, including the diverse set of multi-stakeholder initiatives -- some, but not all, of which include government participation. We will discuss the guidance provided by the UNGPs and other instruments, the range of stakeholders and how they engage with one another, tools utilized by governments and corporations to implement human rights standards, and how all of these interact in the context of both sector-specific and cross-cutting legal and policy challenges.

Among the questions the course will examine are:

  • Which human rights standards are most relevant to business?
  • What are the appropriate linkages between business policies and practices and the promotion of human rights?
  • Which business and human rights approaches are emerging as “best practices" and perhaps even as recognized norms?
  • What tools to support those are being used by governments and corporations?
  • Who are the principal stakeholders and what are their roles and objectives?
  • What are the strategies for addressing business and human rights "governance gaps" at the national and international levels?
  • What are the opportunities for increased integration of labor/human rights and trade policies, and what are the limitations?
  • What mix of mandatory/regulatory and voluntary/“self-regulatory” approaches has been utilized in different situations to advance human rights objectives? Which approaches have been most effective?
  • How are various business and human rights challenges playing out in specific sectors, and how do these inform the debate about different approaches?

To address these and other key questions, the course will begin with several sessions setting out the relevant legal and policy developments, with special attention to the UNGPs. It will also include a review of different stakeholders and their roles and interests, and examination of concepts of corporate responsibility and corporate accountability, and an analysis of the various approaches to business and human rights advanced by companies, governments, labor, civil society, and through multi-stakeholder initiatives. The second half of the semester will then focus on how these concepts are being applied in particular sectors to address specific business and human rights challenges.

Throughout the course, students will be asked to examine the various approaches and differing roles of key stakeholders, including by playing the roles of those addressing the key issues from the perspectives of corporations, civil society and unions, and governments. The class will be divided into three groups for purposes of this “role playing” -- with each asked to adopt all three perspectives during the course of the semester, both in students’ individual analyses of assigned readings and in group sessions during certain classes.

Learning Objectives:

Introduction to business and human rights landscape, including legal and policy developments, particularly the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. The course reviews different stakeholders and roles, examines concepts of corporate responsibility and accountability, and analyzes various approaches to business and human rights advanced by stakeholders. The course will also familiarize students with sector specific business and human rights challenges.

Recommended: There are no formal course requirements, but some basic familiarity with international trade and human rights law is assumed.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this seminar and the practicum course Business and Human Rights.

LAW 500 v00 Center for Applied Legal Studies

J.D. Clinic | 10 credit hours

See the Center for Applied Legal Studies website for more detailed information about the clinic.

For registration-specific supplemental materials, please see the Center for Applied Legal Studies PDF.

For information about clinic registration generally, please see the Clinic Registration Handbook.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not concurrently enroll in this clinic and an externship or a practicum course.

LAW 091 v11 Comparative Constitutional Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

How do we lose (and save) a constitutional democracy? How are constitutions designed? Can constitutions exist without constitutionalism? What is an authoritarian constitution? What influences a constitutional transition? Is it possible to have an unconstitutional constitutional amendment? What forms of judicial review can courts employ? How do courts across the world interpret constitutions? Are courts or legislatures better protectors of constitutional rights? Can constitutions be employed abusively?

Comparative constitutional law has exploded in contemporary constitutional practice and as a field of study. Events around the world—from the Middle East and Asia to Europe and Latin America—underscore the urgency of understanding how constitutional democracies are born and how they can collapse. In this course, we will explore constitutions in global perspective, examining issues of constitutional structure and rights across comparative constitutional systems. We will cover topics like constitution-making, constitutional change, constitutional amendment, judicial review, and constitutional interpretation. Drawing on examples across the world, we will also examine the relationship between the individual and the state in relation to freedom of religious freedom, freedom of speech, and constitutionalism in times of national emergency and in fragile democracies.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the Comparative Constitutional Law Seminar.

LAW 079 v07 Comparative Law: Focus on EU and US

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course consists of an introduction to legal comparison based on an inquiry into European private law. The course is divided into two parts. The first part presents the functions and aims as well the methods of comparative law in general. After an overview of the legal systems in the world, the course provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic features of the civil law system as contrasted with the common law tradition in Europe and in the United States. It also shows how some of the differences between the two systems are being dealt with by new instruments such as the Vienna Convention on Sales, the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts and the Principles of European Contract Law. While the course focuses on substantive law issues, in the fields of contract and tort, it also examines some structural issues -- such as the court systems, the education of lawyers and the role of judicial review. The second part of the course aims at providing an analysis of the trends towards denationalization of private law in Europe as it results from the impact of EC legislation on national law. Special attention is devoted to the link between private law and the formation and the functioning of markets, particularly the Single Market in Europe, but also to the cultural and linguistic obstacles that come up in the process. Overall, the course aims at providing a practical introduction to issues of European law faced by American lawyers, and the use of foreign law to advocate change in U.S. law. Further it will show how legal comparison is a means for thinking about the law in broader terms.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the first year elective by the same name.

Note:

This course will meet on Mondays and Wednesdays on the following dates: 1/19, 1/24, 1/26, 1/31, 2/2, 2/7, 2/9, 2/14, 2/16, 2/24 (Monday classes meet), 2/28, 3/2 and 3/7.

LAW 757 v01 Comparative Tax Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Provides an introduction to the study of comparative tax law. The coverage is broad, touching on many countries and types of taxes, as well as the general legal framework for tax law and tax procedure. Emphasis is on the income tax and, to a lesser extent, value added tax. Focus is on underlying structural differences in legal systems, including constitutional issues, judicial interpretation of tax laws, judicial and legislative anti-avoidance doctrines, different approaches to defining income, alternative systems for taxing corporations and shareholders, and problem areas in the VAT (including international services and e-commerce). The student completing this course will have a basic understanding of how to approach foreign tax law, and tools to better understand the tax system in the student’s own country.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I) and prior or concurrent enrollment in either Corporate Taxation (formerly Taxation II) or Corporate Tax Law I.

LAW 084 v04 Conflict of Laws (Private International Law)

J.D. Course | 3 credit hours

Increasingly, lawyers find themselves planning transactions or litigating cases involving persons or events connected with more than one state or nation. This course examines the principal approaches relied on by U.S. courts to determine what law to apply when some or all of the operative facts underlying a claim or defense arise in another state or nation.  The course also considers the criteria used by U.S. courts in recognizing and enforcing the judgments of the courts of other states or nations.

LAW 089 v00 Constitutional Aspects of Foreign Affairs Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This seminar deals with the distribution of powers between the president and Congress in the areas of war, diplomacy, international organizations, foreign assistance, commerce, money, etc. as well as the distribution of powers between the national and state governments. Such related matters as the impact on individual rights and the political question doctrine in this context are also discussed.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I (or Democracy and Coercion).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this seminar and Foreign Relations Law.

Note: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. All enrolled and waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to be eligible for a seat in the class.

LAW 121 v05 Corporations

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This is a basic course in business corporations. This course explores the governance structure of the corporation and the fiduciary obligations of directors and officers, with a particular focus on the nature of the public corporation. Topics studied may include: the role of shareholders in contrast with the role of directors and officers, the issues surrounding transactions in corporation control, and the procedural problems in stockholder derivative suits. Policy questions such as federal-state jurisdiction, the nature of the corporate governance system, the role of the corporation in modern society, and the role of the lawyer in corporate matters may also be included.

Note: This course will not cover alternative entities or federal securities law.

Note: For students enrolled in Professor Sale's Corporations course: Students should keep their schedules open for the full Monday and Wednesday, 9:00 am - 11:00 am block to accommodate one or more rescheduled classes that the professor anticipates needing to schedule.

LAW 790 v09 Criminal Law Across Borders

J.D. Course | 3 credit hours

International criminal law studies a grim but important subject: the prosecution of war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, and aggression. These are “core crimes” tried by tribunals like the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the tribunals for Rwanda, Sierra Leone, former Yugoslavia, and elsewhere. In addition, we will study the extraterritorial application of domestic criminal law to address crimes of transnational character such as terrorism, torture, and international money laundering. Along with the substantive law on these issues, we examine procedural law on topics such as extradition and immunity from prosecution. The course will also examine the problems confronting international criminal justice today, including the political backlash against accountability. Finally, we will spend some time on alternatives to criminal prosecution such as truth and reconciliation commissions. The aim of the course is to introduce students to basic doctrines of international criminal law, as well as doctrines concerning the extraterritorial application of U.S. criminal law. It also provides an overview of the work of international criminal tribunals and the challenges they face. The course combines law, policy, and history.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the graduate course, International Criminal Law or International Criminal Law Seminar: Tribunals and Crimes or International Humanitarian Law and International Criminal Courts.

Note: This course is a first-year elective. First-year day students select an elective offered in the spring.

LAW 982 v00 Cross-Border Commercial Regulation: Aviation and Maritime Law

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This seminar examines U.S. and international law applicable to aviation and maritime services worldwide. It includes the transportation of both passengers and cargo by air as well as sea. It reviews the evolution and progress made in international law liability conventions (Warsaw, Montreal 1999, Athens 2002) that are applicable to passengers and cargo involved in air as well as sea transport and mishaps/disasters. It examines the emerging applicability of both environmental and security laws and treaties in this area. In the context of public international law, the seminar focuses on the 1944 Chicago Convention and the evolution of restrictive bilateral air transport agreements into the current system of bilateral and multilateral open skies agreements that govern the movement of most passenger as well as cargo airlines of all nationalities throughout the world. The sometimes inconsistent application of U.S. and E.U. competition laws and policies is studied, particularly as they currently govern the developing practices of code sharing among international airlines and comparable global alliances among shipping lines. Also examined are the legal as well as economic (and practical) consequences of these alliances. Finally, the seminar examines the area of aircraft hijacking and the steps the international community has taken to meet these threats.

Recommended: Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law; International Law I: Introduction to International Law (for foreign-educated students, knowledge of these topics from home country study or practice is sufficient.)

LAW 807 v00 Cross-Border Transactions in Latin America

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

The course is designed to give students an overview and practical insight on the legal aspects of doing business with or investing in Latin America. The course will focus on Mexico, but will also address legal issues associated with doing business in Central and South American countries. Topics will be discussed from the perspective of U.S. investors doing business in the region, and will cover the legal implications of cross-border distribution, licensing and joint venture arrangements, acquisitions and direct investments, labor planning and creditor rights.

Recommended: Contracts, Corporations, and International Business Transactions.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 014 v01 Current Issues in Transnational (Private International) Law Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

This seminar provides an introduction to the increasingly important field of private international law as well as an opportunity to explore in depth specific issues now under active consideration in the various international and regional organizations working on the development, codification and harmonization of private international law. Beyond the “classic” questions of jurisdiction, choice of law, judicial assistance and enforcement of judgments, we will explore such substantive topics as international sale of goods, cross-border consumer protection, secured transactions, international securities law, international intellectual property, transport of goods by sea, transnational leasing law, dispute settlement mechanisms, international family law (including international adoption, abduction and enforcement of child support and family maintenance), international privacy and data protection, and even wills and trusts in their cross-border contexts. All students will be expected to choose a topic and to research and to present key findings and recommendations to the class.

This course requires a paper and an oral presentation. It is open to J.D. and LL.M. students. For J.D. students who choose the 3 credit “writing seminar” option, the objective will be to research and write analytical papers of publishable quality on discrete topics of current importance in transnational practice. Students will be required to satisfy the WR requirement including (1) selection of a paper topic approved by the professor, (2) submission of an outline, followed by feedback from the professor, (3) submission of a draft paper of at least 6,000 words exclusive of footnotes, followed by feedback from the professor, and (4) submission of a final paper of at least 6,000 words exclusive of footnotes, incorporating the professor’s suggested revisions. The paper must use legal forms of citation, where appropriate.

Learning goals for this course:

Familiarity with substance of "Private International Law"; ability to research effectively in the field; to write coherently and present conclusions orally; to understand relationship between international and domestic law.

Recommended: International Law I.

Note: This course requires a paper. Students must register for the 3 credit section of the course if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 847 v00 Developing & Financing Infrastructure Projects

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course will use recent transactions involving infrastructure projects (domestic and international) to illustrate the legal techniques and financial issues involved in project development and financing. The course will address case studies involving energy projects, telecom, toll roads, mining, ports, airports, other infrastructure and professional sports facilities. Class discussion will include analysis of how project risk analysis is done and review of key documents used to develop, construct and finance projects. Students will participate in simulated contract negotiation and drafting exercises representing designated parties to a transaction. Coverage will include different sources of financing, including banks, capital markets, ECAs and multinational entities. There will be both a final examination (open-book) and a short drafting exercise that will be graded. Classes 11/12 will be a Special Negotiation Workshop, for which the class will be divided into groups to negotiate a financing term sheet for a model transaction. Depending on pandemic conditions, this may take place during regular classes, or may be done in person on a specified Saturday from 8am-1pm.

The required course textbook is: 

E.R. Yescombe, Principles of Project Finance (London: Academic Press, an imprint of Elsevier, 2014) (2d Edition). Please note that the second edition is materially different from the first edition, and all page number and other references in this syllabus and in the course will be to the second edition.

Additional case studies, such as Henry A. Davis, ed., Project Finance: Practical Case Studies, Second Edition (two volume set: Volume I – Water and Power, and Volume II – Resources and Infrastructure), and other materials not in the above publication will be provided.

Learning objectives:

The course is based on four major themes and aims to teach students to analyze issues in light of each theme: (i) allocation of risk, (ii) non-recourse or limited recourse arrangements, (iii) effective contract structures, and (iv) financeability. The class will focus on both theory (risk analysis and mitigation) and practice (critiquing and drafting agreements). Both the written assignment and the workshop will focus on practical matters relating to practice issues.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Domestic and International Project Finance & Development: Case Studies; or the J.D. course, International Project Finance; or International Project Finance and Investment and Project Development and Finance.

Note: Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 847 v01 Developing & Financing Infrastructure Projects

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course will use innovative transactions  involving domestic and international projects to illustrate the legal techniques and financial issues involved in project development and financing. The course will address case studies involving power projects, telecom, toll roads, mining, ports, airports, and other infrastructure and facilities. Class discussion will include analysis of how project risk analysis is done and review of key players and documents used to develop, construct and finance projects. Coverage will include different sources of financing, including banks, capital markets, and multilaterals, as well as recent market trends, such as social impact investing There will be both a final examination (open-book) and a short drafting exercise that will be graded.
 
Section 10 will have in-class negotiation exercises and drafting exercises with the assumption they represent designated parties to a transaction. 

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Domestic and International Project Finance & Development: Case Studies; or the J.D. course, International Project Finance; or International Project Finance and Investment and Project Development and Finance.

LAW 1102 v00 Drug Law and Policy Seminar: A Critical Perspective on the War on Drugs in the Americas

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

This seminar will explore the policy of prohibition on drug production, distribution and consumption that embodies the long-standing hemispheric “war on drugs”. It will examine the legal regime that underpins current policies on drug trafficking (international, transnational and domestic regulations) related to criminalization but also to arms’ sale and money laundering. We will reflect on the economic and social consequences that drug-trafficking prohibition has had in countries and communities situated on different sides of the global drug trade. Our focus will be primarily on the United States, Mexico and Colombia. The seminar will explore the dominant “law and order” criminalization paradigm and contrast it with other potential approaches that focus on public health and economic development. We will conclude by considering a range of potential policy alternatives to the current model.

Note: This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3-credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2-credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 1067 v01 English Legal History Seminar: Foundations of American Law

J.D. Seminar | 3 credit hours

This seminar emphasizes the development of the common law during the 18th Century--the age of Blackstone and his Commentaries. This was an era of rapid growth in the law, and English procedures and precedents were the foundation upon which much of the law of the early American republic was built. A central focus is on the role of Lord Mansfield as Chief Justice of the Court of King's Bench in creating a modern approach to doctrine and practice. Mansfield was a strong influence on leading American jurists and scholars of the 19th and 20th centuries, such as Joseph Story and Karl Llewellyn. Also studied is the role of the jury in 18th-century English courts--a role that continues to govern the scope of the right to jury trial in the United States under the Seventh Amendment. Special juries will be discussed, including the jury de medietate linguae ("of the half tongue") and the jury of matrons. Attention is given to the problem of crime in the 18th century, to the conduct of the criminal trial, and to the early history of the law of evidence. Students examine and discuss original documentary evidence discovered by recent research. A substantial paper is expected.

LAW 462 v00 EU Law: Selected Topics in ECJ Jurisprudence

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

The course examines the role the European Court of Justice plays in the shaping of European private law as it relates to the functioning of the EU Single Market. It focuses on the way in which the court has interpreted the EU Treaty in order to ensure effectiveness of EU law, and analyzes some of the landmark cases in that area. The course also shows how the court has dealt with the interpretation of directives, particularly in the field of consumer protection, and what impact this case law has on national law making.

Note: WEEK ONE COURSE. This seminar will meet for one week only, on the following days: Monday, January 10, 2022, through Thursday, January 13, 2022, 9:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. The course will have a take-home exam that must be completed between January 21 and January 28, 2022.  This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 1662 v00 European Constitutional Traditions

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course explores the various constitutional traditions that evolved in Europe in the last two centuries, in search of the continuity (or the discontinuity) that characterises every constitutional context and the particular constitutional culture thereof.

If the British constitutionalism epitomises the continuity across the eleven centuries of its monarchy, both the devolution of powers in Scotland and Northern Ireland affirmed in the last decades and the Human Rights Act 1998 (not to mention Brexit) have challenged a perfectly seamless flow of constitutional coherence. How have these events changed British constitutionalism?

Despite the beheading of King Louis XVI in 1793, French constitutionalism has in fact been identified with a recurring monarchical feature: even the law, that became the expression of the popular will once the yoke of the ancien régime was thrown off, acquired the same omnipotence that used to be conferred to the crown and was subsequently removed from any constitutional adjudication for a long time. Is it possible to recognize this monarchical feature also in the 1958 Fifth Republic Constitution and, if so, where?

What about the discontinuity between the German Weimar Constitution, adopted in 1919 after the deposition of King Wilhelm II, and the 1949 Basic Law? What part did fear of the past play in the drafting of the new German constitutionalism and in setting an example of efficiency and human dignity? Are there any similiarities between the German and the U.S. constitutional patriotism?

What about the move in Spain from the national unity imposed by Generalissimo Franco’s long tyranny to the 1978 asymmetrical regionalism? Did Catalonia’s efforts towards independence comply with the Spanish constitutional norms? And what about the transition of Eastern European countries from socialism to (illiberal) democracy?

Finally, a part of the course will be devoted to the discussion of some judgments issued either by domestic European constitutional courts or the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR): these cases will constitute the basis for a comparison with the U.S. constitutionalism during the classes co-taught with Justice Sonia Sotomayor, with special reference to how judicial review is performed, the relationship between the judiciary and other branches, the countermajoritarian difficulty, the judicial and hermeneutical techniques adopted, the recurrence of analogous petitions before the courts, and the possible cross-fertilisation among them.

LAW 089 v03 Foreign Relations Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This is an advanced course on constitutional principles bearing on U.S. foreign relations: primarily, separation of powers, federalism and judicial review of Executive acts and congressional legislation. It focuses on some of the most challenging issues that have divided the American polity from the inception of the Republic and continue to do so today, e.g., the allocation of foreign affairs power between the Executive and Congress; the scope of Presidential power to protect the nation in times of danger; and the proper role of the courts in deciding legal issues relating to national security.  We will study historical materials that inform the legal arguments on both sides of current controversies over Presidential and Congressional power and discuss foreign relations issues under judicial review in 2020. We also study the power to make treaties and executive agreements, the Supremacy clause and application of customary international law by U.S. courts.

Recommended: There are no prerequisites, but familiarity with basic principles of U.S. government is important.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and the J.D. courses, Constitutional Aspects of Foreign Affairs Seminar or U.S. Foreign Relations and National Security Law.

Note: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist.

LAW 089 v04 Foreign Relations Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course addresses the constitutional issues that arise in the conduct of U.S. foreign relations. Topics include: Congress’ power to legislate with respect to foreign relations; the respective roles of the President and Congress in initiating and conducting war and other uses of force; the President’s power to conduct diplomatic relations; the scope of the power to make and enforce treaties and other international agreements; the status of treaties and customary international law as United States law; the role of the States in foreign relations; and the role of the courts in foreign relations.

Prerequisite: Constitutional Law I: The Federal System.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and the J.D. upperclass course, Constitutional Aspects of Foreign Affairs Seminar, or the graduate course, Foreign Relations Law.

LAW 1298 v00 Global Anti-Corruption Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

In 1977, the United States adopted the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”) to combat bribery of foreign public officials. As with many U.S.-led initiatives, it was seen at the time as naïve, quixotic, myopic, and doomed to failure. A little more than 20-years later, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (“OECD”) adopted its Convention on Combatting Bribery of Foreign Public Officials, and as required by the Convention, the countries of Western Europe promptly adopted organic statutes modeled, in large measure, on the FCPA.

In the ensuing decade and a half, prosecutions of corporations for foreign bribery have become perhaps the most important prosecutorial priority for the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) and Securities & Exchange Commission (“SEC”) and certainly the most financially lucrative U.S. prosecution initiative. Transnational investigations have become a staple of these prosecutions. All 10 of the largest FCPA prosecutions have occurred since 2008; of these, eight have involved foreign corporations.

This course will cover the development of U.S., international, and foreign initiatives against public-official bribery. Because (at least in the US) most of these cases have been resolved without litigation, we will focus on critical, unresolved issues, such as the FCPA’s definition of a foreign “instrumentality” and a “foreign official,” as well as the scope of U.S. extra-territorial jurisdiction. In addition to addressing the substance of foreign and international laws and conventions, we will explore the critical issues that arise from the growing trend in trans-national investigations and prosecutions, including double jeopardy, res judicata, and international data collection.

We will explore these issues through fact-based, real-world scenarios drawn, in large part, from the “Bonny Island” case, which involved a scheme by four international corporations to bribe three successive Nigerian presidents (as well as a constellation of lower-ranking officials) to secure multi-billion dollar contracts for the construction of an LNG facility in Nigeria. We will use this factual setting to frame class participation and in-class exercises and projects, with the goal of sharpening critical thinking, tackling complex legal questions in concrete factual settings, and honing advocacy skills.

Learning Objectives:

We have the following expectations of learning outcomes:

  1. We expect each student to achieve mastery of the basic concepts underlying the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, including the basic statutory terms, the elements of the various offenses, and the scope of U.S. jurisdiction. In our experience, it is impossible to fully understand and discuss more challenging questions about the scope or application of the statute without mastery of the fundamentals.
  2. We expect each student to gain an understanding of the roles and policies of the U.S. enforcement authorities, the Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the manner in which FCPA cases are investigated, prosecuted, and defended, as well as how the U.S. enforcement agencies would approach a problem and what outcomes are likely to result.
  3. We expect each student to gain an understanding of the global enforcement landscape for anti-corruption. Students are expected to achieve a basic understanding of the OECD Convention on Bribery, other international anti-bribery conventions, and the leading state laws, including the Brazil Clean Companies Act, the UK Bribery Act, and the French Sapin II. Students will also gain an understanding of the role of the World Bank and other multi-lateral development banks in the worldwide scheme.
  4. We expect students to learn the basic principles of anti-corruption compliance programs, and the manner in which anti-corruption compliance impacts the prevention, detection, investigation, and prosecution of FCPA cases, as well as violations of similar foreign laws.
  5. Through scenario-based learning, we expect students to gain a facility in applying law to fact and an understanding of how governments and defense counsel approach challenging question of jurisdiction, enforcement, and punishment in a multi-jurisdictional, cross-border setting.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this seminar and International Efforts to Combat Corruption Seminar.

LAW 1298 v01 Global Anti-Corruption Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

Objectives and Overview

Addressing corruption has become a global priority. The growing number of high profile cases involving the abuse of public power for private gain has generated moral outrage, particularly at a time of rising inequality.  Moreover, there is an emerging consensus that systemic corruption not only undermines a country’s economic performance but can also lead to political instability and armed conflict. The Course will examine the societal impact of public sector corruption and the efficacy of the criminal, regulatory and administrative steps that are being taken to address it, both at the national level and international levels.  The Course will be interdisciplinary, focusing on the legal, political, economic and institutional dimensions of this highly complex problem.       

Finding a universally accepted understanding of what we mean by “corruption” can prove elusive, and the course will begin by examining how lawyers and social scientists have approached this question. The course will then identify the environments that typically enable corruption to flourish, including natural resource economies and countries that are in economic and political transition. It will also assess the debilitating impact that corruption has on overall economic performance, inequality, poverty, political stability and national security.

Taking into account the above considerations, the course will identify the key ingredients of an effective anti-corruption strategy, emphasizing the importance of a holistic approach that includes not only effective criminalization and prosecution but also comprehensive regulatory and administrative reform.  While legal obligations and best practices have been established at the international level that include many of these ingredients, evidence indicates that meaningful change only takes place when domestic conditions for reform are in place, which are often precipitated by a crisis. In that context, the course will include case studies of reform based, inter alia, on the experience of the IMF, focusing on the anti-corruption program implemented by Indonesia.  Importantly, the course will also assess international efforts to address both the “supply” side of corruption (the provision of bribes to public officials by large corporations) and the problem of “concealment” (when banks in major jurisdictions assist in the laundering of the proceeds of corruption of foreign officials).  These issues will be addressed through a close study of the OECD’s Anti-Bribery Convention and the 40 Recommendations on Anti-Money Laundering and Combatting of the Financing of the Financial Action Task Force. Corruption within the political system will also be examined, including explicit bribery of politicians, conflicts of interests, and private financing of political campaigns (sometimes referred to as “legalized corruption”). Finally, the course will assess the merits of proposals to establish an International Court on Corruption.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have gained an understanding of those crimes that the international community does (and does not) generally accept as constituting corruption - and why there continues to be a debate on this important definitional question. They will also gain insight into the political and economic circumstances that most typically give rise to corruption and the debilitating impact that this problem can have on society. In terms of the design and implementation of an anti-corruption strategy, students will learn about the key elements of the most relevant anti-corruption conventions and international best practices, including the UN Convention Against Corruption. They will have sufficient knowledge to discuss in depth both the efficacy and limitations of these instruments, taking into account the importance of the domestic political environment.  Students’ understanding of these issues will be enhanced by in-depth case studies of corruption reform efforts, including in the context of IMF-supported programs. To that end, students will have an opportunity to discuss with IMF staff past and ongoing cases of reform.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this seminar and International Efforts to Combat Corruption Seminar.

Note: This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3 credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 733 v00 Global Commerce and Litigation

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This survey course covers both basic and advanced concepts in the evolving rules governing modern international sales, distribution and investment transactions. The conduct and structure of international litigation that can arise from these transactions, as well as ways to avoid such international litigation, are also examined. Emphasis is on practical problem solving. Specific areas to be covered will include INCOTERMS, the U.N. Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods, payment mechanisms for international sales, international electronic commerce, the structure of international acquisitions, U.S. and European merger notification controls, foreign ownership restrictions, export controls, corruption, and cross-border litigation and arbitration. There will be an open book final exam.

Prerequisite: Contracts (or the equivalent Bargain, Exchange, and Liability) or for foreign-educated LL.M. students, Foundations of American Law, Introduction to U.S. Legal Methods or a Contracts equivalent course from the home country.

LAW 2007 v02 Global Cybercrime Law

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course will examine the key legal and policy issues associated with cybercrime – i.e., crimes in which computers and the Internet serve as targets, as storage devices, and as instrumentalities of crime – as a global phenomenon. As the Internet has become a truly global medium for commerce and communication, nations are gradually recognizing that new technology can not only expand the reach and power of traditional crimes, but foster new forms of criminal activity as well, throughout the world. The course will adopt an explicitly comparative legal approach to the problem of cybercrime, focusing principally on nations in North America, Europe, and Asia, and address pertinent international legal issues where appropriate. It will first address basic issues in comparative criminal law, as well as background information on computing and Internet technology. It will then address some of the most prominent topics in the substantive law of cybercrime (e.g., pornography and obscenity, "hate speech," cyberstalking, hacking, fraud, intellectual property offenses such as software piracy and economic espionage, and other issues associated with privacy and anonymity on the Internet). It will then turn to major issues in the procedural law of cybercrime (e.g., surveillance technologies such as Carnivore and legal standards for interception of electronic communications). Given the rapid pace of developments in computing and Internet law, the course will incorporate the most current materials available online and in hard copy. Students will be expected to use the Internet for intraclass communications and access to certain course materials, but need not have a detailed knowledge of computing or the Internet.

Prerequisite: Criminal Law.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. seminar, Computer Crime Seminar, or the J.D. course, Computer Crime.

LAW 493 v01 Global Health Law

LL.M Seminar | 3 credit hours

Global Health Law is the flagship course for Georgetown University Law Center’s O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. This course is open to both Georgetown JD and LLM students and is a compulsory unit in the National and Global Health LLM and the Global Health Law and Governance LLM.

No longer an emerging field, global health law encompasses international law and policy that directly or indirectly affects global health, including treaties, regulations, global strategies and other non-binding standards, and national and international jurisprudence. The field of study includes both legal instruments designed to protect public health as well as the interaction between legal instruments from other international legal regimes and public health considerations and concerns. This course provides a strong foundation in these laws and policies, including governance of the World Health Organization, the International Health Regulations, and the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

In examining the application and effectiveness of global health law, this course provides a normative foundation for global health issues including infectious diseases (such as COVID-19, HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and influenza) and noncommunicable diseases (such as diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease and their causes, including obesity, tobacco, and alcohol).

In this course, students will hear from leading voices in global health and the law and benefit from the expertise of Georgetown Law’s O’Neill Institute.

Recommended: Prior enrollment in International Law I.

Note: Required for the Global Health Law LL.M.

Class will meet for two hours each week, with third hour of weekly course content delivered asynchronously.
 

LAW 594 v00 Global Health Law: An Intensive, Problem-Based Exploration

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

In this intensive course, students will work with faculty and fellows at the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law to gain an in­depth understanding of global health law through intensive examination and role play of one or more major problems in global health. Potential problems could include a naturally occurring infectious disease epidemic such as extensively drug resistant tuberculosis; a future epidemic such as pandemic Influenza (A) H5N; an intentional introduction of a lethal pathogen such as anthrax; and/or major chronic diseases caused by obesity or tobacco use. Students should come to this course with a basic level of understanding of global health law, including the major international health treaties and governing structures. When studying and role playing these kinds of problems, students will be asked to construct innovative methods of global health governance, drawing upon existing international health law and institutions, along with a vision for more ideal models. The course will also capitalize on materials developed in collaboration with faculty from the School of Nursing and Health Studies for use in the “health care situation room”.

Full attendance and participation is required at all sessions. Class sessions will consist of a combination of lecture, case simulations, and discussion. Grades are based on student participation, a daily journal to be kept by students, and a final paper.

Note: A student will be permitted to drop a course that meets for the first time after the add/drop period, without a transcript notation, if a student submits a written request to the Office of the Registrar prior to the start of the second class meeting. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 900 v01 Global Indirect Tax: The VAT

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

During this century, the United States has raised revenue chiefly through the income tax, which is a per capita or direct tax. In many other countries, fiscal authorities rely far more heavily on indirect taxes. With the pace of globalization accelerating, U.S. tax professionals increasingly advise foreign clients, for whom indirect taxes may constitute a large percentage of aggregate tax liability. A basic knowledge of how these taxes work is thus a valuable asset for any lawyer doing corporate or international tax work.

This course will introduce students to indirect taxation, exemplified by the European Union’s Value Added Tax (“VAT”) and Canada’s Goods and Services Tax (“GST”), two of the fastest-growing indirect taxes globally. The course will examine the economic and policy rationales for such taxes and study in detail how different types of value added taxes work, including tax calculations and cross-border aspects. Finally, the course will compare the VAT with the retail sales taxes imposed by many U.S. state and local governments and will consider the feasibility of adopting some version of a VAT in the United States. At the end of the course, students will have a broad technical understanding of indirect taxes and an appreciation of the policy concerns that animate legislative and academic discussion of this important subject.

This two-credit course will be divided into nine 3-hour class sessions. All sessions will be taught by global indirect tax professionals from KPMG’s Washington D.C. office.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I).

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 191 v02 Global Law of Work

J.D. Course | 3 credit hours

The law of work is an increasingly important aspect of the global economy. Knowledge of this subject is useful in representing companies, unions, employees, governments and non-governmental organizations. Themes developed in the course also are central to understanding the relationship between law and globalization more broadly. We will study hard and soft law in the various forms in which it operates trans-nationally, including domestic law with foreign effects; public and private international law, such as human rights and trade law; and private codes of corporate social responsibility. The International Labor Organization (ILO), which is a touchstone in the course, is an especially interesting institutional case study: It is the world’s oldest international organization, with 180 member countries giving it near-universal representativeness, and its inclusion of governing roles for civil society groups – unions and employer associations – makes it unique among international institutions. Attention will be given to subordination of documented and undocumented migrants, women, and child laborers.

LAW 661 v00 Global Law Scholars Seminar I: Building an International Skill Set

J.D. Seminar | 1 credit hour

This one-credit (7 session) seminar is designed to provide participants in the 2L year of the Global Law Scholars program with a concrete introduction to some of the specific skills used by practitioners in the fields of international and transnational law. Sessions are presented by a mixture of Georgetown Law faculty and outside practitioners. In addition to an overview of the basic features of international negotiation, arbitration and litigation, and an introduction to comparative law, emphasis is given to research, technical writing, fact-finding and advocacy skills. Skill development is taught through a variety of mechanisms (i.e., case studies, workshop style methods, role-playing, etc.). Student preparation for the various sessions includes readings on both skills and theoretical background. Student evaluation at the end of the course is based on class participation and completion of a short piece of technical writing (i.e. white paper).

Learning goals for this course: Ability to research and write/present a substantive legal topic. Ability to work together as a group on an advanced level topic. Awareness of relationship between international and domestic law.

Prerequisite: This course is open only to second and third year Global Law Scholars.

Note: This course is offered on a mandatory pass/fail basis. This course does not count toward the seven credit pass/fail limit. This class meets for seven sessions in the fall semester. Dates to be announced.

Note: Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 662 v00 Global Law Scholars Seminar II: Applying an International Skill Set

J.D. Seminar | 1 credit hour

This one-credit (7 session) seminar is designed to build on the experiences of the fall 2L GLS seminar (“Building an International Skill Set”) by affording participants an opportunity to apply the specific skills used by international and transnational lawyers in the context of a specific substantive area chosen by them. For 2013/14, the 2L GLS focused on constructing an international trade mechanism to promote corporate accountability in developing countries, specifically addressing environmental and human rights concerns. For 2014/15 the 2L group wrote an assessment of corporate compliance W.R. of 1502 of Dodd Frank in the area of conflict minerals. For 2015/16, the group conducted an in-depth analysis of implementation review mechanisms (CIRMs) in multilateral agreements. In 2016/17 the chosed topic was on use of armed force in outer space. Preparation for the group sessions includes background readings on the theoretical, practical and legal aspects of the relevant issues. Under the guidance of Georgetown faculty, participants determine in advance the goal of their work (for example, an analytical “white paper” on a particular substantive issue, a conference involving noted academics and experts, an advocacy effort, etc.). Student evaluation at the end of the course is based on class participation, contribution to the chosen goal, and completion of a short piece of technical writing.

Prerequisite: This course is open only to second and third year Global Law Scholars.

Note: This course is offered on a mandatory pass/fail basis. This course does not count toward your seven credit pass/fail limit. This class will meet for seven sessions in spring semester. Dates to be announced.

Note: Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 068 v01 Global Revolutions, Civic Activism, and Civil Society

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

This class covers the international legal framework for civic activism. We’ll study laws governing protests, social justice movements, and nonprofit organizations. We’ll also examine how civic space is affected by national security, authoritarianism, and digital technology.

We'll take a global tour, comparing approaches in the US, Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, and Latin America. We'll discuss current events, play the role of UN Ambassadors, and help countries draft laws.

This class will provide skills and contacts to help you pursue a career in international human rights law. Past classes have spoken with UN officials, a lawyer for a group allegedly engaged in terrorism, and human rights defenders around the world.

Internships are also available for eligible students at ICNL, which works on the legal framework for civil society and democracy in 100 countries.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of the semester, you should have the ability to:

  1. Analyze international law governing the freedoms of association, assembly, and expression;
  2. Evaluate the extent to which national legislation complies with international law;
  3. Craft arguments to bring national legislation closer to international law and good practice;
  4. Communicate effectively with diplomats, government officials, and civic activists;
  5. Analyze ethical aspects that arise in crafting laws that affect the freedoms of association, assembly, and expression; and
  6. Assess the impact of law on nonprofit organizations, social movements, and protests.

Note: Space is limited.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety, or to make suitable alternative arrangements with the professor, may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 750 v01 Global Securities Offerings

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

In this course, students will learn how to structure and execute global securities offerings. The course begins with a brief examination of the process of an SEC-registered offering in the U.S., and the ongoing requirements of SEC reporting companies, and then continues by examining how to conduct offerings, both domestically and internationally, outside of SEC registration. Topics include the registration requirements of 5 of the Securities Act, the various exceptions from registration, including Sections 4(a)(1), 4(a)(2) and 4(a)(7) of the Securities Act, the safe harbors pursuant to those exemptions, including Regulation S, Regulation D, Rule 144, Rule 144A, and the changes to certain of those rules and regulations by recent legislation, including the JOBS Act and the FAST Act. In addition to a thorough review of the rules and regulations in the course materials, this course seeks to give students insight into how those rules and regulations are used in practice, and into the mechanics of conducting various types of securities offerings, so that upon completing the course students are better prepared to address these topics in practice. The course was jointly developed by a senior SEC staffer and a private practitioner. Note that there is no pre-requisite for this course.

LAW 565 v00 Globalization, Work, and Inequality Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

A backlash against globalization has emerged in advanced economies as a result of job loss, wage stagnation, precarious work and economic insecurity for the middle class. The liberal globalization of the last three decades is under attack for the unequal distribution of its gains and its failure to provide better opportunities for ordinary working people. Reimagining the global economy will require placing work front and center. This seminar will explore the changing nature of the workplace due to global competition and technological change. It will examine important policy debates about how best to create jobs, improve working conditions, and promote economic growth and well-being. We will analyze how a variety of factors, such as new modes of production and technologies, increasing participation of women in the economy, widespread migration flows, increasing global trade and capital mobility, and the rise of informal economies challenge the assumptions underlying traditional labor and employment regulation in both developed and developing countries. We will consider an array of innovative attempts – national, international, transnational, public, private and mixed -- to improve workplace conditions and assure employment opportunity consistent with economic growth and stability. We will also inquire about the moral and political commitments associated with various approaches.
There are no prerequisites. All students are welcome.

Note: This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3-credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2-credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 1666 v00 Human Rights and Its Discontents Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

We live in an age of Human Rights. Human Rights, as law, discourse, institutional structure, activist organizations, subject activists and local constitutional expressions, can be considered the crowning achievement of Western humanist secular liberalism that has been able to universalize its dictates. And yet, especially since the 90s, critiques of human rights have compounded from those identified with the left of liberalism. Those critiques include: the socialist, the anti-imperialist, the democratic, the multiculturalist, the feminist, the libertarian and the anarchist. The critiques have been so powerful as to create a generalized sense of skepticism in the discourse of human rights within these quarters especially among an emergent generation of activists, scholars, and public intellectuals. Those critiques have been met by a counter critique by a new generation of human rights believers/activists. The bulk of the critique of the critique points to either an empirical evidence of the effectiveness of human rights discourse or to the internal incoherence of the critical claims.

LAW 037 v00 Immigration Law and Policy

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course will examine the U.S. immigration system through legal and policy perspectives. We will explore the source, scope and constitutional limits of congressional power to regulate immigration; the executive branch implementation of immigration legislation, particularly procedures for entry and removal, and the extent of, as well as constitutional constraints on, Presidential power; and the administrative and judicial review of executive branch action. Close attention will be paid to how membership laws and policies are established and implemented: What laws and policies govern U.S. citizenship? Who is eligible to become a legal immigrant? How are annual admissions numbers set? How and why are family and employment priorities created? How does the U.S. protect refugees? With respect to the arrival of unaccompanied children from abroad, we will consider the laws and policies that govern how the U.S. government treats them. Unauthorized migration will also be examined to understand why some migrants do not use the legal route into the U.S. and what laws and policies the U.S. has in place to deter such unlawful movements at the border and control unlawful presence in the interior. We will analyze the impact of the major 1996 immigration control legislation and its implementation, with particular attention to detention and removal. We will closely examine the role of the Justice Department’s Immigration Courts, with special attention to access to justice issues. We will explore the extraordinary need for, and challenges of, immigration law reform, as well as the particular situation of the Dreamers, children without lawful immigration status brought to and raised in the United States by their parents. Finally, we will assess the various changes implemented by the Trump and Biden Administrations, particularly in connection with the treatment of asylum seekers at the U.S.-Mexico border, the resettlement of refugees from abroad, and the removal of unauthorized immigrants.

LAW 037 v02 Immigration Law and Policy

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This class will cover the constitutional and political framework for the U.S. Immigration System, enforcement and adjudication agencies, immigrants, nonimmigrants, removals and deportations, detention and bond, immigration hearings, judicial review, grounds for removal and inadmissibility, “crimmigration,” immigration reform, “Chevron” deference, refugee and asylum status and other international protections. It will also include reading and analyzing major immigration cases like INS v. Cardoza-Fonseca, 480 U.S. 421 (1987) (well-founded fear) and Matter of Kasinga, 21 I&N Dec. 357 (BIA 1996) (female genital mutilation).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and National Security Law Through an Immigration Framework.

Note: Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

NOTE FOR THE SUMMER 2021 SECTION: This professor has committed to teaching this course from the classroom on campus.  Students may participate in-person or remotely.

LAW 939 v00 Immunity Under International Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The attempted extradition of Gen. Pinochet from the U.K. to Spain to account for torture and disappearances in Chile, a tragic car accident in Washington, D.C. in which a sixteen year old is killed by a Georgian diplomat, the alleged expropriation of your corporate client’s investment interests by a foreign government, a civil lawsuit against President Mugabe of Zimbabwe during a visit to the U.S., a criminal case in Chicago against a foreign consular officer for aiding and abetting a fugitive -- such cases bring into sharp relief the operation of international immunities. This mini-course aims to introduce students to the range of jurisdictional immunities recognized by international law and how they are implemented in domestic law. We will cover diplomatic and consular immunity, sovereign (or state) immunity, the immunities accorded to heads of state and government, and the special status of international organizations and their staff and member representatives, including the United Nations, its specialized agencies and individuals on special missions. Increasingly, practicing lawyers (especially those who represent governments and international organizations or who practice in places where embassies, consulates, missions and international institutions are located) need to be familiar with the reach of these rules and doctrines, and the exceptions thereto. Our focus will be on the practical application of the various international conventions, domestic statutes, and judicially crafted rules which define the law of international immunities.

Prerequisite: No prerequisites, but some familiarity with basic international law and the process of civil litigation is strongly recommended.

Strongly Recommended: Introduction to International Law

Note: Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 226 v00 Intellectual Property in World Trade

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

The knowledge, technological inventions, creative works and accumulated experience and expertise of the professional workforce increasingly drives the global economy. Unlike physical capital, this intellectual capital cannot readily be confined to the territorial setting of its origin. The development of cohesive norms to protect intellectual properties on a global basis has thus proven to be an enormous challenge. This course considers this effort by addressing the core international agreements governing intellectual property; norms and norm-making in the international intellectual property rights system; dispute settlement and the enforcement of rights; and tensions arising between intellectual property rights and distinct legal and cultural values.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and International Intellectual Property and Development and the graduate course, International Protection of Intellectual Property Through the WTO.

LAW 230 v00 International and Comparative Law on Women's Human Rights

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

In many parts of the world, women are discriminated against, abused, treated as property, and even murdered because they are women. But today, there is a substantial body of international and regional human rights law that can be used to change the national laws that permit these practices or fail to protect women against them. In addition, many countries have begun to give women equal rights in many fields. Thus, there is now a body of human rights and comparative law that advocates can use to advance equal human rights for women.

This course provides students with an overview of that law. It introduces them to the many forms of discrimination and violence women still face and teaches them about the major human rights treaties that can help women achieve equality with men. These include the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; and the regional human rights treaties from Africa, the Americas, and Europe. Students study the work of the human rights bodies that measure state compliance with these treaties, including their guidelines and case law on issues affecting women. The course also examines comparative law on human rights issues such as sex-based discrimination in employment, inheritance, and family law rights, domestic violence and female genital mutilation, polygamy and its impact on women and children, and women’s lack of reproductive rights.

National court decisions from countries in both common law and civil law jurisdictions show how courts are using international and regional human rights law to help resolve domestic law issues. As some issues pose difficult conflicts between women’s right to equality with opposing assertions of religious and cultural rights to discriminate, the course also examines how human rights bodies resolve those conflicts and asks how they should be resolved.

Note: For J.D. Students: Students Enrolled in the International Women’s Human Rights Clinic must take this course as a pre- or co-requisite, but it is also open to other J.D. students and to LL.M. students.

LAW 882 v00 International Arbitration

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Examines United States, foreign, and international law and practice relating to international commercial and investment arbitration, including the U.S. Federal Arbitration Act, the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Arbitral Awards, the ICSID Convention, the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules, and the arbitration rules of major arbitral institutions such as the ICC, the AAA and the LCIA. The course focuses on the procedural law applicable to and the practical aspects of arbitration. It will cover such topics as enforcing arbitration clauses, conducting arbitration proceedings, judicial oversight of arbitration, choice of law, enforcing and setting aside awards, and particular issues arising in arbitrations against sovereigns.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I); International Business Transactions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Commercial Arbitration, Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration, International Arbitration, or the J.D. seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar (CTLS course)

LAW 882 v08 International Arbitration

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Examines United States, foreign, and international law and practice relating to international commercial arbitration, including the U.S. Federal Arbitration Act, the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, and the arbitration rules of major arbitral institutions such as the ICC, JAMS, the ICDR, etc,  The course focuses on the procedural law applicable to and the practical aspects of arbitration. It will cover such topics as enforcing arbitration clauses, conducting arbitration proceedings, judicial oversight of arbitration, choice of law, enforcing and setting aside awards as well as drafting dispute resolution clauses.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I); International Business Transactions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Commercial Arbitration, Introduction to Commercial Arbitration or the J.D. seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar (CTLS course).

LAW 802 v01 International Assistance for Global Health

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

The overall objective of this course is to explore the present and potential role of international human rights law – and the right to health in particular – in international assistance for global health.

During the first class, we will discuss the recent history and present practice of international assistance for global health. We will discuss tensions between the objectives of development and relief, and between the objectives of promoting ‘health security’ and equity in global health. During the second class, we will explore the concept of equity in global health: how it is central to several definitions of global health, what the practice of international assistance for global health should look like, if the predominant objective of that assistance were equity. During the third class, we will examine the meaning of the right to health, the freedoms and entitlements it generates and the corresponding national and international responsibilities. During the fourth class, we will discuss if and how the right to health can be used to modify/improve the practice of international assistance for global health, taking into account that such assistance serves other objectives as well.

Strongly Recommended: Completion of coursework in the area of international human rights law.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. The take-home exam in this course may be administered mid-semester and the specific exam date will be provided by the professor after the add/drop period.

LAW 876 v04 International Business Transactions

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This three credit course is an introductory survey of legal issues that arise in connection with international business transactions.  Subjects covered include:  (1) laws and treaties involved in cross-border business transactions; (2) core international business transactions, including international sales and letters of credit, non-establishment (agency, distribution, contract manufacturing, franchising, licensing) and establishment (branch, subsidiary, joint venture) forms of doing business, equity and debt/project finance transactions, and mergers and acquisitions; (3) fundamental legal concepts such as choice of law, choice of forum, jurisdiction, investment protection (expropriation), anti-corruption and competition regulation, and dispute resolution, focusing on litigation and arbitration, (4) the transfer and protection of intellectual property, and (5) corporate social responsibility.

The learning outcomes for this International Business Transactions course include: (1) basic knowledge and understanding of (a) substantive and procedural laws concerning international business transactions, and (b) the role of private and public international law in the conduct of international business; and (2) international legal analysis and reasoning, problem solving, professional skills, and written and oral communication in the context of international business transactions.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law; a course in Finance or Securities Regulation.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Business Transactions and International Dispute Resolution or the J.D. courses, International Business Transactions or International Economic Law.

LAW 876 v07 International Business Transactions

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

An introductory survey course examining transactional and litigation issues faced by international businesses. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the broad scope of issues affecting international business prior to the students choosing other courses for further specialization and to introduce students to analytical tools used by lawyers who advise on matters related to international business. Topics will include the international sale of goods (including letters of credit), international contract issues, cross-border financings (including letters of credit and bank financings), and international investments. Litigation topics will be related to the transactional issues covered and will include a special emphasis on contract rights and remedies, choice of law, choice of forum, and international arbitration.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Business Transactions and Dispute Resolution or the J.D. courses, International Business Transactions or International Economic Law..

LAW 876 v10 International Business Transactions

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

An introductory survey course examining transactional and litigation issues faced by international businesses. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the broad scope of issues affecting international business prior to the students choosing other courses for further specialization and to introduce students to analytical tools used by lawyers who advise on matters related to international business. Emphasis is given to the actual practice of international business law.  Topics will include the international sale of goods (including letters of credit), international contract issues, cross-border financings (including letters of credit and bank financings), and international investments including project finance. Litigation topics will be related to the transactional issues covered and will include a special emphasis on contract rights and remedies, choice of law, choice of forum, and international arbitration.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Business Transactions and Dispute Resolution or the J.D. courses, International Business Transactions or International Economic Law.

LAW 876 v11 International Business Transactions

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 4 credit hours

This four-credit survey course studies the major legal issues arising in international business, trade and investment activity, taught from a practical, problem-oriented approach. The focus of the course is on the law and practice that is different when business, trade or investment takes place across an international boundary. The principle areas of coverage are: 1) the movement of goods, including the Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG), contracts for transportation, and financing, including the law of letters of credit, 2) problems of international investment and the transfer of intellectual property, including the international law governing patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets, 3) national and international rules for dealing with imports and exports, including export controls and sanctions and trade remedies (antidumping, countervailing duty and safeguards), 4) public international law disciplines that arise in connection with anti-corruption efforts and norms of corporate social responsibility, and 5) international dispute resolution, including investment arbitration, trade disputes at the WTO, and private international commercial litigation issues, including choice of law and forum issues.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and International Business Transactions and Trade Law or International Economic Law or the LL.M. course, International Business Transactions.

LAW 882 v03 International Commercial Arbitration

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course presents an introduction to international commercial arbitration. It examines the nature of arbitration, the procedures used in international arbitration (both institutional and ad hoc) and the enforcement and setting aside of arbitral awards. The course will also cover drafting arbitration agreements, the law applicable to arbitrations (including the New York Convention, the ICSID Convention and various institutional rules), challenges to arbitration, multi-party arbitrations, jurisdiction, preliminary or interim measures and selection of the arbitral tribunal. The course also provides an introduction to arbitration between investors and states. Grades will be based primarily upon short papers addressing current issues in international arbitration.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the LL.M. seminars International Commercial Arbitration, Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration, or International Arbitration; or the CTLS seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar.

LAW 882 v06 International Commercial Arbitration

LL.M Course | 1 credit hour

In today's global economy, parties to cross-border commercial transactions increasingly choose to resolve their disputes through international arbitration. This course provides students with an understanding of the law and practice of international arbitration from the perspective of United States law. Among other things, the course will consider the alternatives to international arbitration; the international conventions and U.S. arbitration statute; the arbitration agreement; the role of courts and tribunals in determining issues of arbitrability; international arbitration rules; provisional measures; judicial enforcement of arbitration agreements and arbitration awards; and judicial setting aside of arbitration awards.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Arbitration, Introduction to Commercial Arbitration or the J.D. seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar (CTLS course).

Note: WEEK ONE COURSE. This course will meet for one week only on the following days: Monday, January 11, 2021 through Thursday, January 14, 2021, 9:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. The course will have a take-home exam that must be completed during the week of Friday, January 15th through Friday, January 22nd, 2021.

This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 1036 v00 International Contracts and Sales Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The course analyzes private law norms regulating international contracts. It focuses on international conventions and uniform rules of law, such as the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sales of Goods (CISG), the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts, the Principles of European Contract Law, INCOTERMS, and others. The course includes some aspects of conflicts of law rules, as well as an analysis of the main international instruments governing international commercial arbitration.

Prerequisite: Contracts (or the equivalent Bargain, Exchange, and Liability).

Note: This course will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays on the following dates: 1/18, 1/20, 1/25, 1/27, 2/1, 2/3, 2/8, 2/10, 2/15, 2/17, 3/1, 3/3 and 3/8. 

LAW 416 v02 International Courts and Tribunals: Theory and Practice

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course surveys existing international courts and tribunals. Over the semester, we will examine courts and tribunals with general jurisdiction (e.g., the International Court of Justice); courts and tribunals with specialized jurisdiction (e.g., the International Criminal Court, WTO, human rights tribunals, and investor-State tribunals); and claims tribunals and commissions (e.g., the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal and the United Nations Compensation Commission). The course seeks to provide a comparative understanding of the international adjudication system through readings and in-class exercises. General knowledge of public international law is required.

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in International Law I.

LAW 790 v00 International Criminal Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

In international criminal law, we begin by examining the basics: what criminal law is supposed to do and the fundamentals of international law and jurisdiction. We then study issues relating to transnational application of domestic penal codes, such as extradition and the extraterritorial application of U.S. criminal law and the U.S. Constitution. We may choose a transnational crime—such as money laundering or corruption—as a vehicle for examining the efficacy of transnational application of domestic standards. The focus of the course then shifts to truly international, rather than transnational, law. We examine the history of international tribunals intended to enforce international crimes (Nuremberg, the ICTY, and the ICTR), and delve into the structure and operation of the International Criminal Court. We focus on substantive international crimes such as genocide and crimes against humanity, and may also cover war crimes, crimes of sexual violence, and/or torture. The course closes with a consideration of alternatives to criminal prosecution, such as truth and reconciliation commissions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. first-year elective or the graduate course with the same title.

LAW 790 v01 International Criminal Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Examines selected issues involving the application of criminal law to international activities and across national boundaries. The course covers both the procedural aspects of international cooperation in criminal matters (including extradition,  cross-border investigations, mutual legal assistance, and recognition of foreign penal judgments) as well as the developing substantive international law (e.g., war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide, cybercrime, and trafficking in drugs, people and firearms). Particular attention is paid to the question of jurisdiction over criminal activities at the international level, in the context of activities such as money laundering, organized crime, and computer crime, including the reach of Constitutional protections to investigations and law enforcement activities overseas. Addresses the structure, jurisdiction, and jurisprudence of the ad hoc criminal tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda and the statute and rules of evidence and procedure of the International Criminal Court.

Recommended: Criminal Law, Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law (or the equivalent Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law (International Focus)); International Law I: Introduction to International Law.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. course with the same title; the J.D. first year elective, Criminal Law Across Borders; or the J.D. seminar International Criminal Law Seminar: Tribunals and Crimes; or the J.D. course International Humanitarian Law; or the J.D. course International Criminal Courts.

LAW 1260 v00 International Economic Law Practicum (Project-Based Practicum)

J.D. Practicum | 4 credit hours

In a project-based practicum course, students participate in a weekly seminar and work on a project done on behalf of a developing country government, an international organization, an NGO or an SME under the supervision of their professor(s) and in conjunction with expert mentors. This project-based practicum course will focus on international economic law, primarily international trade or investment law. Students will participate in a two hour/week seminar (during some weeks, the seminar meets twice, other weeks, the seminar does not meet and only team meetings take place) and carry out 10 hours/week of project work under the direction of the course professors.

SEMINAR: This practicum offers a unique opportunity to thoroughly analyze international trade and investment law, as well as broader issues of international economic law, and jurisprudence through a combination of practice and theory. The practicum has three goals. First, to enhance students’ substantive legal knowledge of international economic law. They will do so not through traditional in-class teaching but hands-on, by working on a specific legal project, of high practical importance for their “beneficiary.” Second, the practicum aims at improving students’ professional skills to become successful lawyers: the ability to analyze complex legal problems, to apply the law to a set of facts, to interact with beneficiaries, to work in groups with other lawyers across cultures and language barriers, to convincingly make oral presentations, to write legal memos or submissions, and to adapt the explanation of legal expertise to a diverse audience. Third, the practicum aims to stimulate personal skills and aspirations of students: to make them aware of professional opportunities in the international law field; to discover new challenges. Through interactions with other (often foreign) students and a diversity of (often foreign) “beneficiaries”, participants will build inter-personal skills, learn about other cultures, and experience the challenges and needs of a wide variety of stakeholders affected by international economic law, beyond large multinationals.

PROJECT WORK: Students will work in small groups (“project teams”) and under the close supervision of one or more Professors ("Supervising Professors"), invited experts (“Mentors”) and the Teaching Assistant (TA) on specific legal questions related to international economic law (IEL) coming from “real clients” (“beneficiaries”) such as international organizations, governments, SMEs or NGOs. In addition, introductory sessions by Mentors will be held to provide substantive background to the respective topics, as well as sessions to improve research and legal writing skills. At the end of the semester, the groups will submit written legal memos or other work products and orally present their projects in class in the presence of the beneficiary and other invited guests. To get an idea of the types of projects done in previous years, see www.tradelab.org.

The practicum is part of the broader TradeLab network and operates in collaboration with TradeLab (www.tradelab.org) to enable beneficiaries to submit projects, to facilitate the operation of the teams and to promote the completed work to the public. TradeLab is an online platform that allows countries, NGOs and other smaller stakeholders easy and smart access to legal talents in the field of trade and investment law, allowing these actors to reap the full development benefits of global trade and investment rules by making WTO, preferential trade and bilateral investment treaties work for everyone.

Prerequisite: Students must complete a basic trade/WTO or investment law course before applying. J.D. students must complete the required first-year program prior to enrolling (part-time and interdivisional transfer students may enroll prior to completing Criminal Justice, Property, or their first-year elective).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not concurrently enroll in this practicum course and a clinic or another practicum course. Students may concurrently enroll in this practicum course and an externship.

Note: This practicum course is open to LL.M. students, space permitting.


This practicum may be suitable for evening students who can commit to attending class and participating in 10 hours/week of project work.

THIS PRACTICUM REQUIRES PROFESSOR PERMISSION TO ENROLL. Please send a CV, and an email indicating which trade/WTO or investment law course you have taken, why you are interested in taking the Practicum and what it is you think you can add to the teams, to Marty-Junior Kibiswa at (mik32@georgetown.edu) by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, January 4, 2021. After January 4, please contact Marty-Junior Kibiswa to inquire whether spaces remain available; if so, students will be admitted on a rolling basis at that time.

This is a four-credit course. Two credits will be awarded for the two-hour weekly seminar and two credits will be awarded for approximately 10 hours of project work per week, for a minimum of 11 weeks. Both the seminar and the project work will be graded.

Students who enroll in this course will be automatically enrolled in both the seminar and project components and may not take either component separately. After Add/Drop, a student who wishes to withdraw from a practicum course must obtain permission from the faculty member and the Assistant Dean for Experiential Education. The Assistant Dean will grant such withdrawal requests only when remaining enrolled in the practicum would cause significant hardship for the student. A student who is granted permission to withdraw will be withdrawn from both the seminar and project components.

Default attendance rule for all practicum courses (unless the professor indicates otherwise): Regular and punctual attendance is required at all practicum seminars and fieldwork placements. Students in project-based practicum courses are similarly required to devote the requisite number of hours to their project. If a student must miss seminar, fieldwork, or project work, he or she must speak to the professor as soon as possible to discuss the absence. Unless the professor indicates otherwise, a student with more than one unexcused absence from the practicum seminar (out of 13 total seminar sessions), or one week of unexcused absences from the fieldwork or project work (out of a total of 11 weeks of fieldwork or project work), may receive a lower grade or, at the professor’s discretion, may be withdrawn from the practicum course.

LAW 166 v00 International Efforts to Combat Corruption Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

International anti-corruption has become an increasingly “hot topic” among lawyers and policymakers: governments, international organizations, and technical experts all identify corruption as a serious impediment to comprehensive economic development. If left unchecked, corruption threatens to undermine the effectiveness of development initiatives in both the public and private sectors. Growing enforcement of legal instruments such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the UK Bribery Act have placed anti-corruption squarely on the agenda of a wide variety of transnational organizations. With so many variant actors invoking the importance of anti-corruption, lawyers must not only have a working knowledge of what corruption entails, but also understand how the development of an international anti-corruption legal framework is changing the way business is conducted in a global economy.

This course explores the international legal framework of anti-corruption, the scope of anti-corruption instruments, the methodologies employed by international actors enforcing these instruments, and the policy dilemmas implicated by these endeavors.

Given the dynamic nature of anti-corruption initiatives, the course presents an interdisciplinary, interactive approach to the subject matter. The class will introduce and discuss perspectives from academic texts, policy papers and media. It is hoped that this broad-based approach will provide students with a strong theoretical foundation in anti-corruption law, foster a practical understanding of international anti-corruption work, and inspire students to integrate this avenue of study into their future professional endeavors.

Students will complete a research paper 20-25 pages in length.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this course, students will have a working knowledge of the role anti-corruption policy and political institutions (i.e., FCPA, OECD, and UNCAC) play in the field of anti-corruption. Students will be able to engage in professional discussions on the historical context of international anti-corruption efforts, the state of the current political and international climate, and the future of anti-corruption by making connections between past policy and current events. Students will be able to articulate original views, back them up with research and defend them through strategic thinking by engaging with guest-lecturing practitioners and the final oral presentation. Students will further deepen their knowledge on a particular topic within the field by conducting a research paper in which they will need to provide insightful analysis making connections among historical and current policies, institutions, and governments.

Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in at least one course in private or public international law might be helpful but is not necessary.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this seminar and Global Anti-Corruption Seminar.

LAW 145 v00 International Environmental and Natural Resources Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

The course focuses on international law applicable to the leading environmental and natural resource issues.  It provides a framework for identifying and addressing the legal issues, links international law with relevant national laws, and focuses on ways to strengthen compliance with international obligations.  The course covers climate change, ozone depletion, transboundary pollution and hazardous waste disposal; natural resource issues of fresh water (both surface and ground water), marine resources, and biodiversity; the links between human rights and environment and between environment and trade; and the financing of sustainable development.  Special attention is given to cutting edge issues, such as synthetic biology and climate intervention. 

Learning goals for this course: To enable students to become effective counsel, litigators, negotiators, arbitrators, judges, or legal advisors on a broad range of international environmental and natural resource problems; to understand international negotiations; and to be able to apply legal concepts developed in the course within different national settings for implementing international law. 

LAW 197 v01 International Finance

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

In 1970, about 90% of international transactions represented trade in goods and services. On the eve of the last financial crisis, about 90% of international transactions reflected movement of capital unrelated to trade. This course examines aspects of national and international law that govern cross-border capital movements. The goal is to discern elements of an evolving legal regime for international finance.

We will consider current issues in international finance from the transactional, regulatory, and policy perspectives – reflecting the different functions of the law in this area. Beyond basic legal concepts relevant to international banking, securities and currency markets, we will address topics including crisis response, international institutions, government debt, foreign assistance and microfinance. The syllabus assumes no background in finance, economics, banking or securities law. In addition to classroom engagement and a take-home exam, course components include policy and negotiating simulations, and a news blog.

Recommended: Federal Banking Regulation, Securities Regulation and International Law I: Introduction to International Law.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and International Finance and Regulation.

LAW 197 v00 International Finance and Regulation

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course explores some of the key financial transactions that animate the international economy and the global regulatory architecture governing them. Substantive subjects include the global financial architecture, international banking regulation, project finance, derivative products and syndicated lending. The course also addresses the intersection between financial regulation and international monetary law by surveying the 2008 financial crisis, the European debt crisis, the future of the dollar as an international currency and the offshore renminbi market.

Recommended: Corporations.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and International Finance.

Note: The first class is not mandatory, though it is highly advised.

LAW 227 v04 International Human Rights

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course examines the law, institutions, and advocacy strategies designed to protect international human rights.  We will analyze civil and political rights and economic and social rights, as well as international humanitarian law, and explore key enforcement mechanisms at the national, regional, and international levels. The evolving role of NGOs and civil society actors in advancing human rights, and the responsibility of corporations, will also be examined. Both progress and enduring challenges in making human rights real “on the ground” will be a focus of this course, together with the need for effective enactment of legal standards, enforcement of those standards, and empowerment of affected communities. Current legal issues and strategies concerning climate change and human rights will also be highlighted.  

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the graduate course, International Human Rights Law.

LAW 814 v00 International Human Rights Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course provides an intensive survey of international human rights law and practice, with a principal focus on interpretation and implementation of human rights obligations, commitments, and norms in the practice of states. The course has three main components: in the first unit, we examine the development of the substantive law of human rights and its sources (including treaties, customary international law, and non-binding international instruments). In the second unit, we examine implementation of international human rights in the international, regional, and domestic systems, focusing on UN organs such as the Human Rights Council and treaty bodies, as well as regional mechanisms. Finally, in the third unit we look at the application of the substantive law and implementation mechanisms in the context of current issues in international human rights, including in the context of atrocities and the refugee crisis. The course highlights selected contemporary ethical problems in international human rights law such as genocide and torture, application of human rights obligations, commitments, and norms to non-state actors (including corporations), universality of human rights and cultural relativism, and the need to protect human rights while countering terrorism, including issues relevant to U.S. law and practice. Along the way we examine issues related to international immunities, impunity, human rights litigation under the U.S. Alien Tort Claims Act and Torture Victim Protection Act, and international criminal tribunals. 

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Human Rights Law, or the J.D. course, International Human Rights.

LAW 814 v02 International Human Rights Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

How can the international legal system address some of human kind’s greatest weaknesses? This course provides an intensive survey of modern international human rights law and the legal institutions and systems of oversight that support it. Through a mixture of lecture and class discussion, we will look at how and why these mechanisms developed, and critically analyze how they -- as well as States, non-State actors, and individuals -- succeed or fail in practice to promote and protect human rights at the international, regional, and domestic levels. We will cover the foundations of the modern system including the International Bill of Human Rights and the Geneva Conventions, as well as subsequent developments including treaties and declarations regulating the use of certain weapons, prohibiting torture, protecting the rights of persons with disabilities, protecting refugees, promoting the rights of indigenous peoples, eliminating racial discrimination and discrimination against women, and establishing the international criminal court. We will also look at how “soft law” has developed to address emerging human rights-related fields such as corporate social responsibility and data privacy protection. Highlighting contemporary issues in international human rights, we will ultimately ask ourselves how current international human rights mechanisms can address today’s conflicts, including refugee crises, natural resource disputes, and international campaigns against terrorism.

Recommended: Prior enrollment in International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or equivalent).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Human Rights Law and Practice.

Note: Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 235 v02 International Law I: Introduction to International Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course deals with the nature and sources of international law and major developments in the international legal system. It considers such topics as treaties, executive agreements, and customary international law; the recognition of states and governments; jurisdiction over disputes with international elements; foreign sovereign immunity; various methods for international dispute resolution, especially courts and international arbitration; the role of international law in the U.S. legal system and the allocation of foreign affairs powers between the President and Congress; the roles and operations of the United Nations, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and other international and regional entities, such as the European Union and the World Trade Organization; Law of the Sea; International Criminal Law; how the international system protects (or fails to protect) human rights and the environment; and the use of force against other countries, rebellions, or terrorist groups.


Learning goals for this course:

Ability to analyze and interpret treaties, judgments and other international law instruments. Awareness of relationship between international and domestic law, how international law is made and applied, how domestic legal systems differ in their approach to international law.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the first-year elective International Law I: Introduction to International Law, or the LL.M. course International Law Essentials: The U.S. Perspective.

LAW 235 v16 International Law I: Introduction to International Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course deals with the nature and sources of international law and major developments in the international legal system, including the interaction of international law and municipal (domestic) legal systems. It considers such topics as treaties, executive agreements, and customary international law; jurisdiction over disputes with international elements; foreign sovereign immunity; methods for international dispute resolution; the role of international law in the U.S. legal system; how the international system protects (or fails to protect) human rights and the environment; and the use of force against other countries, rebellions, or terrorist groups.

Learning Objectives:

This course will expose you to a different legal system – the regime of contemporary public international law governing the conduct of states and international organizations – as well as the way that legal regime is incorporated in the law of the United States. It also serves as a general precursor to other international law courses in the Georgetown Law curriculum.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the first-year elective International Law I: Introduction to International Law, or the LL.M. course International Law Essentials: The U.S. Perspective.

LAW 235 v17 International Law I: Introduction to International Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course is a broad introduction to public international law. Students will consider the nature of international law as law, sources of international law including customary international law, and the role of national and international tribunals in international dispute resolution. The course will also cover topics including the fundamentals of treaty law, statehood, recognition of states and governments, jurisdiction and immunity, state responsibility, international humanitarian law, international human rights law, international environmental law, the law of the sea, and international commercial disputes. The course will touch on other relevant topics as time permits.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the first-year elective International Law I: Introduction to International Law, or the LL.M. course International Law Essentials: The U.S. Perspective.

LAW 235 v18 International Law I: Introduction to International Law

J.D. Course | 3 credit hours

This course provides a broad introduction to the nature, sources and operation of international law. The aim is to provide you with a solid understanding of the basic principles, instruments and institutions of “public international law,” both as a framework for further study and for dealing with the international legal issues you are likely to encounter in practice.

Accordingly, we will survey the law governing treaties and other international agreements, the nature and content of customary international law, the recognition of states and governments, the role and operation of international and regional organizations such as the United Nations and the OAS, issues of state responsibility, international human rights, the law of the sea and outer space, international dispute resolution mechanisms (including the role of the International Court of Justice and other courts and tribunals), and international peacekeeping and principles governing the use of force (including counter-terrorism efforts).

We will also spend some time on the role international law plays in the U.S. legal system as reflected, for example, in concepts of (and restrictions on) civil and criminal jurisdiction, diplomatic and foreign sovereign immunity, and enforcement of foreign judgments.

Without any question, developments during the summer will give us ample opportunity to discuss a number of “hot topics” as they arise (in such areas as international refugee law, rules on the use of force, responding to acts of terrorism, trade relations, cyber warfare, environmental law, cyber-crime, trafficking in drugs and persons, trans-border corruption, UN actions and sanctions, Brexit, etc.).

The course is appropriate for both J.D. and graduate students, both beginners who have never studied international law as well as those who have some prior exposure or experience. We welcome students who received their initial legal training in other countries.

It is important to attend all class sessions, especially the first class session where we will give an overview of the course and explain our expectations for attendance and performance.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the LL.M. course International Law Essentials: The U.S. Perspective.

LAW 1010 v00 International Law in Domestic Courts Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

How does international law apply in domestic legal systems? When are treaties and customary international law binding in national courts? What are the rules and mechanisms of “incorporation”? Do judges have a responsibility to follow generally accepted rules of international law? This seminar offers students an opportunity to research, write and make presentations about specific issues related to the status of international law in domestic legal systems. The primary focus will be on the U.S. system, but a comparative approach is included and students are encouraged to investigate the treatment of international law in foreign legal systems that directly incorporate customary international law as well as those where international legal rules always require legislative enactment.

These issues arise in varying contexts, from human rights litigation under the Alien Tort Statute to habeas proceedings concerning GTMO detainees, from compliance with ICJ decisions to displacement of state law under ratified treaties and executive agreements, from the impact of rulings by the International Criminal Court to questions of sovereign immunity and Acts of State, from using international law to interpret domestic statutes to the proof of foreign law in civil and commercial cases. More broadly, we will be exploring whether domestic courts can or should act as enforcers of international law, whether domestic courts should be considered part of an emergent “global judiciary,” the importance of transnational cooperation between courts, etc.

This course is open to J.D. and LL.M. students and requires a paper and an oral presentation.

Learning goals for this course:

Ability to research, use, and write about topics at the intersections of international and domestic law; awareness of how different legal systems deal with relevant topics; ability to present orally and in writing.

Recommended: International Law I.

Note: J.D. students must register for the 3 credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the two-credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 1231 v00 International Law Seminar: Poverty Reduction and Accountability

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This seminar examines efforts to reduce poverty in countries and problems of accountability in doing so, whether in international institutions, national institutions, or the private sector. Considers various approaches to accountability. Covers issues of compliance, good governance, human rights, corruption, environmental sustainability, and experience with various accountability mechanisms in international institutions. Includes two simulations in which students must address accountability issues.

Learning goals for this course:  To understand the difficulties of reducing poverty within countries and the legal issues associated with bringing accountability to doing so.  Students should be able to develop insights that can be applied in both the public and private sectors. 

Recommended: A basic course in public international law.

LAW 1024 v00 International Law Seminar: Water Resources

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Fresh water resources are predicted to become increasingly scarce in some regions and a source of conflict. This seminar covers a broad range of issues in international water law, including surface and ground water allocation, water quality, water agreements and river basin institutions, human right to water, water markets, demand management, and links with international economic law. Water is viewed both as a source of conflict and as an opportunity for cooperation. Includes a simulated negotiation for an international river or transboundary aquifer problem, and a simulated dispute settlement. Draws upon domestic water laws in understanding international water law.

Learning goals for this course: To understand legal aspects of water resource issues and the basic hydrology underlying the issues; to be able to identify the interests of different countries and other actors in an international negotiation over a water issue and to fashion solutions by thinking out of the box; to understand water litigation and the needs of judges/arbitrators in dealing with water resource issues.

Recommended: A basic course in public international law is helpful. 

LAW 761 v03 International Law, Human Rights & Fighting Impunity

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

This course will explore the global fight against impunity -- specifically, as it pertains to curbing war crimes, human rights violations, grand corruption and looted antiquities -- through class discussions, lectures and guest speakers with personal experience in fighting the impunity that is so often associated with war crimes and economic crimes. It is based on the premise that those that are willing to slaughter thousands of innocents, are also willing to steal millions of dollars and loot our collective cultural heritage – and that the fight against impunity includes both war crimes and economic crimes (and often, the international trend to focus on the former, ignores the domestic interest in prosecuting the latter). Over the semester, students in a seminar-size class will be exposed to the basics of international criminal law, international human rights law and international economic crimes, as well how the fight against impunity impacts national security and foreign policy issues. The class will focus on issues related to war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide, as well as the recent global efforts to fight grand corruption and recover looted assets and antiquities, including UN Convention Against Corruption and the new UN-World Bank Stolen Asset Recovery (StAR) Initiative. Students will be allowed to write a paper of their choice regarding international law and the fight against impunity. Class grades will be a combination between class participation (40%) and a seminar paper (60%). Required readings (cases, statutes, articles, book excerpts, on-line treaties, etc.) will be illuminated by lecture and discussion from a professor with first-hand experience in the global fight against impunity through his personal experience with the Slobodan Milosevic, Saddam Hussein and Omar al-Bashir matters, as well his background with the UN war crimes tribunal, the White House, the Pentagon, and the World Bank’s StAR Initiative, and helping recover stolen assets on behalf of various governments. In order to take advantage of Georgetown’s unique position in the intersection of law, politics, and international affairs, the course will feature high-profile guest speakers who will highlight their own personal efforts to fight impunity and how such international efforts impact national security and foreign policy matters.

Prerequisite: International Law I or equivalent.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 076 v00 International Migration and Development

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course is for students who are interested in acquiring a broader knowledge and a better understanding of research related to international migration and development.  Topics covered include:  past, present and anticipated future trends in international migration, including the various factors (e.g., economic, social, political) that influence population movements; elements of the normative and legal frameworks upon which migration policies may be based; relationships between international migration and economic development, economic growth and economic competitiveness, poverty alleviation, social networks and social support systems, national and international security, transnational organized crime, and human rights, among other issues; and institutional arrangements that enhance international cooperation to promote safe and orderly migration.

Learning Objectives:

This course offers an overview of the theoretical debates in the field of international migration and the empirical data upon which these debates hinge.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1.     Describe recent trends in migration at national, regional and global levels;
  2.     Compare theories of international migration from different disciplinary perspectives and different units of analysis (e.g., individual, household, national, global), identifying the advantages and disadvantages of each;
  3.     Analyze the usefulness of current international legal frameworks in defining the rights of migrants and states’ responsibilities to protect those rights;
  4.     Assess the economic and social impacts of migration on both origin and host societies;
  5.     Understand and analyze the concept of “brain drain” in describing high-skilled migration;
  6.     Understand and analyze the concept of “social remittances”;
  7.     Compare processes of immigrant integration;
  8.     Understand the ways in which smuggling and trafficking undermine international migration;
  9.     Understand the ways in which climate change and development projects contribute to migration; and
  10.     Understand the various mechanisms for managing international migration.

Students should also be able to:

  1.     Demonstrate critical thinking, research and writing skills;
  2.     Evaluate empirical evidence; and
  3.     Articulate and defend findings (real or proposed) from their research papers

Note: Priority is given to students fulfilling the requirements of the Certificate in Refugees and Humanitarian Emergencies and to students enrolled in the Certificate Program in International Human Rights Law.

See the schedule of courses on the Main Campus Registrar's website for room assignments. Law Center students may register only through the Law Center's registration system.

This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3 credit WR section of the seminar (LAWJ-076-09) if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 240 v00 International Negotiations Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This seminar seeks to develop skills and knowledge to participate in negotiations and in particular international business negotiations. Approximately a third of course time is devoted to the negotiating process and analysis of negotiation principles and dynamics. Another third is spent on the cultural, practical, legal and strategic elements of international business transactions. The balance is spent on a series of "mock" negotiations. Students, individually and in groups, experiment with different negotiating techniques and fact situations of increasing complexity. The course requirement is principally satisfied through preparation of a comprehensive negotiated agreement and follow-up memorandum. Heavy emphasis is placed on class participation, including the negotiations. The final negotiating problem requires substantial team work with others, including strategy, analysis, and preparation. Negotiations are carried on both inside and outside normal class time.

Recommended: Contracts.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and the International Negotiations Seminar (LAWJ/G-958) or International Negotiations (LAWJ/G-3029) in the graduate program, or International Business Negotiations.

Note: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist.

Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 958 v00 International Negotiations Seminar

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

After introductory lectures on negotiation theory and practice, the seminar students will be divided into teams for a series of simulated negotiations covering government-to-government, government-private and transnational private negotiations.  Student performance in these negotiations and class discussions will comprise most of the course grade; no research paper or examination is required.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may receive credit for this course and International Business Negotiations. Students may NOT receive credit for both this course and International Negotiations or the J.D. course, International Negotiations Seminar.

Note: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist.

LAW 928 v01 International Project Finance

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course provides a detailed overview and analysis of the technique of project financing in an international environment (particularly in emerging markets). The focus is on the perspectives of the various parties to the project, including output purchasers, providers of goods and services, equity holders, and especially commercial banks, international financial institutions and other lenders. The aspects peculiar to infrastructure projects in specific industries (such as power generation, ports, toll roads, etc.) are also considered.

Learning objectives:

Achieve competency in understanding and analyzing international project finance transactions, from the perspective of the various parties to the project, including:

  • Identify, understand and analyze project risks during development, construction and operational phases;
  • Analyze transaction structuring and identify contractual and non-contractual risk mitigation and shifting methods for project parties;
  • Apply basic finance and legal principles with respect to practical and contractual remedies, as well as dispute resolution mechanisms; and
  • Consider specific case studies, as well as sample transaction documents, to better understand the issues that arise in a typical international project financing.

Recommended: Contracts; Accounting Concepts for Lawyers; Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law (or the equivalent Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law (International Focus)); Corporate Finance; Corporations.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: Developing and Financing Infrastructure Projects; International Project Finance and Investment; International Project Finance & Development: Case Studies; Project Development and Finance or Transacting International Finance.

LAW 928 v03 International Project Finance

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

This course examines legal, business and policy issues that arise in international project financings, particularly in emerging markets, and analyzes how such transactions are structured and negotiated and related risks are allocated. We consider the typical roles played by parties to such transactions (equity sponsors, lenders, customers, suppliers and host governments), interests associated with such roles, and how competing interests tend to be reconciled. We will focus on how negotiated arrangements are embodied in and supported by typical transaction documentation such as project documents, financing documents and legal opinions. Coverage will include illustrative local law and political risk issues. Selected international investment transactions, both actual and hypothetical, will be used to illustrate recurring themes.

Course requirements include participation in a simulated international project loan negotiation with outside experts serving as clients.

Recommended: International Business Transactions; Conflict of Laws: Choice of Law; Secured Transactions; Corporate Finance.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: Developing & Financing Infrastructure Projects; Infrastructure Projects in Developing and Transition Countries; International Project Finance; International Project Finance and Investment; International Project Finance & Development: Case Studies; Project Development and Finance or Transacting International Finance.

Note: This course has an additional MANDATORY session on Saturday, April 09, 2022, 8:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Location to be announced at the start of the semester.

LAW 928 v02 International Project Finance and Investment

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Examines legal and financial aspects of foreign investment projects, especially in developing countries, from the perspective of the investor, lender and the host country. Legal issues related to the structuring of the foreign investment, the arrangement of the private and public financing, and the construction of a project are considered. A significant amount of time will be devoted to analysis of typical international project finance documentation, but the international and host country legal issues applicable to foreign investment, support from national and multinational agencies, noncommercial risk analysis and dispute resolution will also be considered and discussed.

Prerequisite: A course in International Business Transactions, or background in international business or financial transactions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: Developing Infrastructure Projects, Infrastructure Projects in Developing and Transition Countries; International Project Finance; International Project Finance & Development: Case Studies; Project Development and Finance or Transacting International Finance.

LAW 820 v01 International Protection of Intellectual Property Through the WTO

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course deals with international protection of intellectual property through the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the WTO agreements which cover intellectual property: the TRIPS Agreement, The Paris Convention and the Berne Convention. The course will also cover the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the Dispute Settlement Understanding, which are essential in enforcing these agreements.

The course examines in detail the relevant U.S. law and how the extraterritorial application of these laws effects international enforcement of intellectual property. These laws are Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 which prohibits the importation of articles into the United States which infringe U.S. patents, trademarks, or copyrights, and Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 which allows retaliation against foreign countries which impose unjustifiable or unreasonable restrictions against U.S. commerce.

The main WTO cases in intellectual property will be read and analyzed. These will include the cases on Sections 337 and 301, which have limited the United States’ ability to unilaterally affect intellectual property law. Other cases will include the U.S. – Cuba Havana Club case, the Indian Pharmaceutical case, the Internet Gaming case, the U.S. Musical Copyright case, the European Geographical Indication (GI) case, the Canada Pharmaceutical patent case, and the China Intellectual Property Violation case. The course will study the Doha Agreement, which allows the compulsory licensing of pharmaceutical patents to fight pandemic diseases particularly HIV/AIDS. Finally, the course will review any significant changes in trade law or existing trade agreements, particularly as relates to intellectual property, that may occur under the Trump administration

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Intellectual Property in World Trade (LAWG/J-226).

LAW 509 v01 International Tax

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course is an introduction to the law and policy of U.S. taxation of U.S. and foreign persons engaged in cross-border activities. The course will address both how individual and corporate foreign taxpayers are taxed by the United States, and how U.S. individual and corporate taxpayers are taxed by the United States on income earned in or from other countries. Topics will include U.S. jurisdiction to tax, allocation of income, withholding taxes, the foreign tax credit, deferral, transfer pricing, and tax treaties. The course will also consider how the U.S. rules in these areas are influenced by developments in other countries. The goal of the course is to provide an overview of the relevant law and policy considerations, with a focus on specific issues that are presently contested as a policy matter. Students should leave the course with an understanding of the basic framework for U.S. international tax law and a sense of some of the policy debates surrounding the current rules.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit both for this course and for U.S. International Inbound Tax (formerly: U.S. Taxation of Foreign Persons in the United States); or U.S. International Outbound Tax (formerly: U.S. Taxation of Domestic Persons with Activities Outside of the U.S.); or U.S. Taxation of International Transactions.

Note: Required for foreign-trained Tax LL.M. students pursuing the Certificate in International Taxation.

 

LAW 509 v02 International Tax

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course is an introduction to the law and policy of U.S. taxation of U.S. and foreign persons engaged in cross-border activities. The course will address both how individual and corporate foreign taxpayers are taxed by the United States, and how U.S. individual and corporate taxpayers are taxed by the United States on income earned in or from other countries. Topics will include U.S. jurisdiction to tax, allocation of income, withholding taxes, the foreign tax credit, deferral, transfer pricing, and tax treaties. The course will also consider how the U.S. rules in these areas are influenced by developments in other countries. The goal of the course is to provide an overview of the relevant law and policy considerations, with a focus on specific issues that are presently contested as a policy matter. Students should leave the course with an understanding of the basic framework for U.S. international tax law and a sense of some of the policy debates surrounding the current rules.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit both for this course and for U.S. International Inbound Tax (formerly: U.S. Taxation of Foreign Persons in the United States); or U.S. International Outbound Tax (formerly: U.S. Taxation of Domestic Persons with Activities Outside of the U.S.); or U.S. Taxation of International Transactions.

Note: Required for foreign-trained Tax LL.M. students pursuing the Certificate in International Taxation.

 

LAW 798 v00 International Telecommunications Policy and Regulation

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This seminar addresses global information and communications technology (ICT) regulation and policy. In particular, it offers a multi-faceted view of the legal, economic, policy and technological underpinnings of global ICT. We will examine 1) key national and regional approaches to ICT; 2) the roles of key intergovernmental institutions and regional organizations (e.g., the International Telecommunications Union, Internet Governance Forum, the World Trade Organization) in shaping and promoting regulatory policies; 3) the key issues posed by emerging technologies, such as unmanned aerial vehicles; and 4) the challenges posed by new methods of content delivery, such as video streaming and other internet-based services. This seminar will also examine key nations' domestic law, regulations, and policies governing international telecom services, wireless and satellite services, and spectrum management, including the cross-sectoral challenges arising in access to this scare resource. Specific focus is on the challenges that increased global access to content and new technologies present to established international regulatory approaches and the national regulators. Grading shall be based on the exam and student participation in class discussion throughout the semester; optional class presentations will also be taken into account.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent, International Law I).

Note: Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 244 v01 International Trade

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This three-credit survey course is designed to introduce students to the legal system governing international economic transactions and international economic relations, with a focus on the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its constituent treaty instruments. The primary objective of the course is to give the student an in-depth overview of the world trading system and some exposure to its particular details. The course will cover the basic principles and mechanisms of international trade law, including most-favored-nation (MFN) and national treatment, and relevant law in different substantive areas, including tariffs, quotas, services, intellectual property, trade remedies, and standards.  We will also examine the issue of development in the WTO and trade treaties and whether treaty obligations constrain countries’ policy autonomy and hinder their ability to pursue successful development strategies, as well as the tensions between trade liberalization and other values, such as those concerning the environment, health and safety, workers’ welfare, and human rights.

The course will also cover current trends and issues in international trade law.  The Uruguay Round established the WTO in 1994 as the premiere forum for negotiating multilateral trade agreements and adjudicating international trade disputes; however, the negotiation and adjudication functions of the WTO currently face significant challenges.  Globally, more than 300 regional or bilateral trade agreements have been negotiated, including the recent United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) and Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), with implications for both individual countries and the global trading system overall.  The course will include current developments at the WTO, bilateral and regional trade agreements (including U.S.-Europe and U.S.-Kenya negotiations and trade models in other parts of the world like China’s Belt and Road Initiative and the African Continental Free Trade Area), Brexit, and U.S. “trade wars” pursued on national security grounds.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Trade and the WTO or International Trade Law or World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement; or the graduate course, International Trade Law and Regulation.

LAW 691 v00 International Trade and Health

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The objective of this 2 credit seminar is to introduce students to the relationship between international laws governing trade and efforts to protect and promote human health. The course will focus on the impact of the law of the World Trade Organization (WTO) on domestic health measures as well as on international efforts carried out under the auspices of the World Health Organization. Students will learn, and be asked to think critically about, how the international trade regime affects national regulation in the interests of human health.

The course will address the following subject matter:

  1. Introduction to 'trade and health': issues and underlying theories.
  2. The prohibitions and exceptions of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in a health context.
  3. Risk regulation, the precautionary principle and sanitary measures (such as import safety measures).
  4. International standards and technical barriers to trade, such as labeling measures.
  5. Trade in health services, health worker migration and the General Agreement on Trade in Services.
  6. Access to essential medicines under the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs) and TRIPs plus agreements.
  7. The fragmentation of international law: cross-fertilization between international trade law and global health law.
  8. Policy coherence, legitimacy and participatory governance at the WTO.

Note: A student will be permitted to drop a course that meets for the first time after the add/drop period, without a transcript notation, if a student submits a written request to the Office of the Registrar prior to the start of the second class meeting. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 673 v01 International Trade and Investment Litigation and Strategy

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course will teach students the practical aspects involved in litigation of international trade and investment disputes. Its goal is to prepare students entering either private practice or government service to handle complex litigation in those fields. The course will provide a comparative analysis of the dispute settlement mechanism of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and Investor-State arbitration. While it will focus on procedural issues and case management, the first sessions will provide an overview of the legal framework of the multilateral trading system and investment treaty law. It will identify and analyze each phase of the proceedings of WTO disputes (under the Dispute Settlement Understanding) and of investor-State arbitrations (mainly under the arbitration rules of the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes and Chapter Eleven of the North American Free Trade Agreement). Some of the topics that will be covered include: pre-trial preparation, formal initiation of a dispute, constitution of panels and tribunals, discretionary procedural issues, evidentiary issues, jurisdictional and other preliminary objections, written pleadings, conduct of hearings, use of witnesses and experts, awards and rulings, recourses, implementation and enforcement, and in general case management. The analysis and discussions in class will be based on treaty text, jurisprudence and the practical, hands-on experience of the professors. Guest-speakers – including practitioners, government officials, or staff from relevant international organizations – will be invited to a few sessions. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and in simulations.

Recommended: Basic courses in public international law and international trade.

LAW 244 v02 International Trade Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

In 1995, the World Trade Organization (WTO) was established as a result of the Uruguay Round Trade Negotiations (1986-94). The international trade rules that came into force as a result provide the legal framework for much of international economic relations. This legal framework is analyzed in this course, focusing on the impact of trade agreements, especially the Uruguay Round Agreements, in national legal systems, particularly that of the United States. The course is focused on public international trade law, that is, the trade rules applicable between countries, rather than private international law or commercial contracts between private economic operators, and how that public international law came into being and has been interpreted and applied. The course examines the WTO as an institution and as the base system of rules governing international trade. It will examine in some detail each of the key legal principles and how they operate at both the national and international level, dealing with subjects such as tariffs and tariff negotiations, quotas, most favored nation clauses, regional trading blocs and preferential trade agreements (such as NAFTA, TPP, TTIP, and others), national treatment clauses and exceptions for environmental and other policies, safeguards and adjustment assistance, dumping, anti-dumping duties, export subsidies, countervailing duties, international rules on patents and copyrights, trade in services (such as banking and tourism), technical barriers to trade, rules on plant and food safety, and other topics. The WTO, with its proven and sophisticated dispute settlement system, now has extensive jurisprudence in most of the areas of law covered by the WTO Agreements. This course will also explore this jurisprudence, the public international law behind it, and implications of it for national governments as well as private actors.

The goal of the course is to give a rounded and in depth understanding of the international trade law system and of the interplay between national and international rules as they affect government actions that influence private international transactions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Economic Law or International Law II or International Trade and the WTO or International Trade Law or World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement; or the graduate course, International Trade Law and Regulation.

LAW 244 v05 International Trade Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

Economic interdependence between countries and across production chains has grown exponentially. Yet, today, economic globalization is under attack. In this context, existing rules on international trade, and negotiating fora to potentially change those rules, are key. This course focuses on the rules and institutions established under the World Trade Organization (WTO) as well as selected regional trade agreements. What are the benefits and risks of trade liberalization from legal, economic and political perspectives? How can trade liberalization go hand in hand with pursuing public policy goals such as protecting the environment or labour standards ("non-trade concerns"), job creation or promoting the economic development of poor countries? The course will offer an in-depth, practical knowledge of substantive WTO law drawing heavily on case law from dispute settlement practice. It will address the basic principles of trade in goods and trade in services as well as more specific WTO agreements on, for example, health measures, subsidies, trade remedies and intellectual property rights. The course will also focus on the unique WTO mechanism for the settlement of trade disputes, and especially on how it balances trade liberalization with non-trade concerns as well as how it copes with increasing trade tensions between OECD countries and emerging economies like Brazil, China, India and Russia.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Trade and the WTO or World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement; or the graduate course, International Trade Law and Regulation.

Note: There are no prerequisites for this course. 

This course will meet 2 times per week in the weeks of August 30 - September 17 and October 11- October 29. In addition, there will be three classes taught remotely on October 7, November 11 and November 16. 

LAW 966 v01 International Trade Law & Regulation

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

Examines international trade laws and regulations and World Trade Organization agreements affecting international trade, and the relationship of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 and other international agreements to U.S. law and practice. Considers, in detail, the U.S. antidumping, countervailing duty, safeguards (Section 201) laws and regulations and the WTO agreements that establish multinational standards applicable to the use of those remedies. Examines the WTO agreements on services, intellectual property, and technical barriers to trade. Examines the statutory remedies, particularly Section 301, that are available to address foreign restrictions on U.S. exports of goods, capital, services, and intellectual property. Analyzes the U.S.-China "trade war" and resulting tariffs and agreements.  Evaluates the role of Congress, the U.S. Trade Representative, and other U.S. agencies in setting trade policy and overseeing administration of the trade laws. Analyzes the WTO procedures for dispute resolution and key WTO panel and Appellate Body decisions. Reviews free trade agreements, including the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, as well as bilateral investment treaties. The course includes a weekly discussion of current events affecting international trade law and regulation.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. course, International Trade or World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement.

Note: The 3-credit section of this course meets the "Category 1" requirement for the WTO certificate program.
The two-credit class requires a final exam; the three-credit class requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the three-credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement for JD students. The paper requirements of the two-credit section will not fulfill the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement for JD students.

LAW 898 v01 International Trade Remedies and the WTO

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This class is an intensive workshop designed to use case studies of U.S. agency decisions and related WTO jurisprudence to: 1) develop students’ substantive understanding of trade remedy law; and 2) introduce students to the policy and procedural aspects of the various phases of trade remedy disputes in the U.S. and at the international level. The class will include an examination of U.S. law and WTO agreements on antidumping measures, subsidies and countervailing measures, and safeguards. Particular attention will be focused on developing strong oral and written advocacy and presentation skills through issue spotting exercises/mock agency hearings and the final writing assignment.

Prerequisite: International Trade (3 credits), OR International Trade and the WTO, OR International Law II, OR International Economic Law, OR International Trade Law & Regulation OR World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the course WTO: Dumping, Subsidies and Safeguards.

LAW 959 v00 International Trade, Development & the Common Good

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course will examine the connection between trade law and development (including international and regional trade agreements, comparative law, and diverse areas of market regulation at the national level). It will engage students in ways in which economic law can help encourage sustainable development and deliver impact. It will also assess challenges associated with regulatory capacity and the uneven implementation of laws in practice. Overall, the seminar will highlight the role of law and regulation as a driver for sustainable development and inclusive growth and link broader legal frameworks and policy debates with the needs of individuals and enterprises on the ground. Cross-cutting and inter-disciplinary approaches in the field, such as rule of law, poverty alleviation, human rights, food security, global value chains, social entrepreneurship, and gender and trade will also be discussed throughout the seminar.

The seminar will take place in three phases. In Phase I, the seminar will explore the historical and institutional relationship between trade and development, including international legal frameworks and rule of law.  Phase II will cover a number of substantive aspects of economic law and development in depth, all of which impact stakeholders and communities in developing markets and hold greater potential to contribute to the common good.  Specific areas of focus include investment and domestic market regulation, sector-specific regulation, non-tariff measures, regulation of services, trade facilitation, labor and environment, intellectual property rights, and digital trade.

Readings will be drawn from a variety of viewpoints and sources – law review articles, white papers, academic journals, newspapers and magazines, and excerpts from books – and will cut across trade and economic law, inclusive economic development, and business.  In addition to the readings assigned for each session, optional background readings will be included for students wishing to explore a topic in greater depth (additional background reading is recommended for students who have not taken a trade law course).  The readings will highlight different aspects of the legal and regulatory environment in the context of encouraging sustainable development globally and at the grassroots level. Discussion questions are included for each session, which can be used as the basis for class preparation

The course will also incorporate short, practical case studies that illustrate how different issues in trade, development, and economic regulation can be applied from the perspective of an entrepreneur, country, or community.  Seminar members will be asked to assume roles in discussion of these case studies, which will count towards class participation and lay the groundwork for the final paper.  Questions to guide the case study analysis will also be provided. 

Note:

Only the 3-CR WR section will fulfill the WTO & International Trade Certificate List C requirement.

LAW 708 v00 International Trade, Intellectual Property Rights, & Public Health

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course will cover the interface between the intellectual property rights, international trade and public health, focusing in particular on the WTO TRIPS Agreement and subsequent decisions. It will provide an introduction to the provisions of WTO agreements relevant to public health (other than TRIPS), and to the law and economics relating to IPRs and public health; it will cover the provisions of the TRIPS Agreement relevant to public health, and discuss the relevant disputes settled in the WTO. It will examine the background, content and implications of the Doha Declaration on the TRIPS Agreement and Public Health and of the subsequent TRIPS amendment implementing compulsory licensing for exports. It will also discuss the relevance of bilateral or regional free trade area agreements to the subject.

The course would study relevant national/regional implementing legislation, for example on compulsory licenses, and discuss use of the WTO export compulsory license provisions, namely the Rwanda-Canada case. In addition to the final paper, students will be graded on class participation, individual presentations and group exercises, an example of the last being a hypothetical case study of exports, with students taking up the role of legal advisors based in either the importing country or the exporting country.

Finally, the course will also cover recent work on trade, intellectual property and public health in other intergovernmental organizations, in particular in the World Health Organization.

Recommended: Coursework in International Trade, Intellectual Property Rights, or Public Health.

LAW 520 v00 International Women's Human Rights Clinic

J.D. Clinic | 10 credit hours

Please see the International Women’s Human Rights Clinic website for more detailed information about the program.

For registration-specific supplemental materials, please see the International Women’s Human Rights Clinic PDF.

For information about clinic registration generally, please see the Clinic Registration Handbook.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not concurrently enroll in this clinic and an externship or a practicum course.

LAW 456 v01 International Women’s Human Rights Seminar

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This seminar will explore select international women’s human rights issues and the applicable international legal framework, including the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW.) Guest lecturers with practical expertise in advancing women’s human rights may be invited to join us throughout the semester. Each student will write a paper addressing a significant international women’s human rights issue from a legal perspective, exploring state responsibility under the government’s international human rights obligations, as well as domestic and international responses to the problem.

LAW 063 v00 Issues in Disarmament: Proliferation and Terrorism Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This seminar addresses various issues related to the spread of advanced weapons to diverse countries and non-state actors, considering a set of problems that will raise the most difficult security concerns for the United States and the rest of the world in the post-cold-war era. In the seminar, we will explore a wide range of weapons technologies--including nuclear, chemical, biological, and conventional armaments--and the political and legal mechanisms that constrain them. The seminar will address historical allegations concerning the dissemination and use of these weapons; the rise and fall of various strategic doctrines; the bureaucratic processes of government decision making; and the evaluation of relevant ethical considerations surrounding possession and use. The bulk of the seminar will focus on contemporary legal and political issues such as ongoing treaty negotiations, export controls, verification of compliance, enforcement of treaty commitments, and the dismantling of redundant weaponry. The seminar is particularly recommended for those interested in exploring careers in public international law, but will also be relevant to others interested in the role of the lawyer in influencing United States public policy more generally. Each student will prepare a substantial original research paper and participate in small exercises designed to provide some simulated experience in characteristic legal tasks, such as drafting, analyzing, briefing, etc.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and Proseminar in National Security Law.

LAW 254 v02 Japan/US Comparative Legal Study

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

This course provides a comparison of aspects of the Japanese and US legal systems with the objectives of (a) providing some insight into the Japanese system, (b) demonstrating how legal concepts taken from an established legal system are "reinterpreted" when imported into a different legal system based on a different culture and history and (c) providing a basic understanding of selected Japanese legal topics. Among the substantive law areas which will be compared (after a survey of historical and societal foundations which affect the Japanese and US legal systems) are various aspects of Constitutional Law including Separation of Powers, the Legal System and the Japanese Constitutional provision Renouncing War; the differing views of dispute resolution including Litigation, mediation and other Alternative Dispute Resolution devises and their role in the legal systems of Japan and the US; discussion of the New (1998) Code of Civil Procedure and its potential effects on the future of litigation in Japan; the changing environment of the study and practice of law in Japan, including the 2001 recommendations of the Council on Judicial Reform; Equality and concepts of equal treatment opportunity; Criminal Law and Administrative Law.

Note: WEEK ONE COURSE. This seminar will meet for one week only on the following days: Monday, January 8, 2018 through Friday, January 12, 2018, 6:00 p.m. - 8:35 p.m.

This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students.

Attendance at all class sessions is mandatory and all enrolled students must attend the first class in order to remain enrolled. Students on the wait list must attend the first class in order to be admitted off the wait list. Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar. Once the second class session begins, students may only seek a withdrawal by contacting their academic advisor in the Office of Graduate Programs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 1334 v00 Justice and Accountability for International Atrocity Crimes: Bridging Theory and Practice Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This seminar examines both progress and ongoing challenges in seeking meaningful justice and accountability for serious international crimes, including crimes against humanity, genocide, and war crimes. We’ll begin with an overview of the challenges of effective atrocity prevention and an examination of fundamental developments over the last few decades establishing international and hybrid criminal tribunals and other mechanisms of transitional justice, including truth and reconciliation commissions. Building on this foundation, and drawing upon legal scholarship, social science research, and country case studies, we will then explore a range of responses to key justice challenges recurring in a number of countries emerging from conflict. These challenges include: (1) the often complicated relationship between peace processes and justice initiatives; (2) the question of whose justice goals are being pursued and how national, regional, and international stakeholders interact in such efforts; and (3) the complexities of building enduring justice on the ground through meaningful domestic rule of law reform, outreach, cultural engagement, and other means. Students will write a substantial seminar paper within the subject matter scope of the seminar.

LAW 852 v00 Law and Foreign Investment in China

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The course will examine the major Chinese laws that apply to foreign invested projects in China and related cross-border transactions. We will begin with an overview of China's policy priorities for foreign investment and the foreign investment approval process, focusing on the sources of law and regulation relevant when planning entry into the China Market. We will then consider the options for structuring a foreign investment under the Company Law and the Foreign Investment Law with its impact on the Sino-foreign Equity Joint Venture Law, the Cooperative Joint Venture Law, and the Law of Wholly Foreign-owned Enterprises. We will also study the requirements for foreign acquisitions of existing Chinese enterprises under China's M & A rules. The preparation of the project application report or feasibility study is also a key part of the foreign investment approval process, involving a number of important laws and regulations. We will study how China's environmental laws, rules and regulations on foreign exchange, financing and security, land use laws and labor laws must also be considered when forming a venture in China. Foreign investment projects in China typically involve cross-border arrangements that are crucial to the foreign investor's goals, especially technology licensing and trademark licensing. In this context, we will study the PRC contract law, and the challenges encountered in the protection of intellectual property. Finally, we will look at the issues involved in exiting an investment in China, whether by disposal or termination, and dispute resolution. We will work primarily with English translations of PRC law, with some secondary sources. No knowledge of Chinese language is required.

Recommended: Students should have prior or concurrent coursework in International Business Law. Examples of such courses would include: International Economic Law, International Law II, International Business Transactions, Global Commerce and Litigation, etc.

LAW 977 v00 Law and Measures Against International Terrorism

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

In the decade since the 9/11 attacks, the United States and most other countries have significantly altered ways in which they respond to international terrorism. Many government measures against terrorism have stretched domestic and international law to their limits. Controversial changes to laws have altered the balance between governments' interest in ensuring public safety and individuals' fundamental rights. The class will discuss current events from around the world to explore domestic and international legal bases for counter-terrorism measures such as intelligence gathering, criminal law enforcement, efforts to prevent terrorism financing, and use of military force. Students completing the course will have an overview of laws that apply to governments' responses to terrorism. The course will be graded by exam.

Recommended: Prior enrollment in International Law and/or International Humanitarian Law

LAW 2010 v01 Law and Regulation of Global Health Technologies

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Technological advances in diagnostics and therapeutics have the potential to revolutionize health care and improve the lives of millions of people. However, many of these technologies remain out of reach to those who need them, particularly the poor in low- and middle-income countries.

With increased investment and global attention over the last decade, there has been tremendous progress in building a pipeline of candidate medical technologies to meet the health needs of the world’s poorest people. This course will explore the legal, regulatory and policy issues that are shaping the research, development, and delivery of those drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics. Part I of the course will provide an overview of the burden of neglected diseases in low- and middle-income countries and the new institutions and initiatives that have arisen to address that burden. Part II will examine the incentives for global health innovation, including intellectual property management, regulatory and tax incentives, and prizes and advance market commitments. Part III will consider the role of national and international regulation, international clinical trials and the globalization of research, and World Health Organization’s policy processes for ensuring drug and vaccine safety and recommending their use. Part IV of the course will explore the legal, regulatory and policy issues that arise in the delivery and use of global health technologies, particularly supply chain contracting, drug resistance, and post-market surveillance in low- and middle-income countries.

LAW 936 v02 Law of War

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Surveys the law of armed conflict (LOAC) and customary international law as applied by the United States in warfare. From where does LOAC arise? What is a war crime – and who decides? What is “unnecessary suffering,” and what drives that legal determination? When does LOAC apply and what role do other rules of law, such as domestic U.S. law and International Human Rights Law play in regulating the conduct of armed conflict? Does it cover non-state actors? What are U.S. LOAC obligations, and how are they enforced? How does one distinguish illegal combatants from prisoners of war? Where do military commissions come from, and who may be tried by them? Could the atomic bombing of Nagasaki have been a war crime? Can a superior’s order constitute a defense to war crime charges? What is the U.S. position in regard to laser weapons? Land mines? Non-lethal weapons? Torture? Rendition? Reprisals? The assassination of enemy commanders? What is an illegal order, and what should a soldier do if she receives one? How may battlefield war crimes be prosecuted? Our inquiry will focus on the law applicable to the conduct of U.S. military operations in past and current conflicts, whether or not they be declared, whether they be internal or international. Although primarily focused on the law of land warfare, the law of air and naval warfare, as well as space and information warfare, will be considered.

Learning objectives:

To gain a firm understanding of the law of armed conflict and to consider, through discussion of practical exercise from the textbook, how the law is applied in an operational context.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this seminar and Law of War, the International Law of Armed Conflict Seminar or War Crimes and Prosecutions.

LAW 936 v03 Law of War

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This survey course covers the law of armed conflict and customary international law as applied on today’s battlefields. Is there really law in combat? When does the law of war apply? Does it apply to non-State actors? What is a war crime, and who decides? How is proportionality determined? What is the difference between a combatant, a terrorist, and a criminal? Is torture ever lawful? Is targeted killing lawful? What constitutes a cyber attack? What is the jurisdiction of military commissions and why is that a difficult question for Guantánamo? Can a superior’s order constitute a defense to war crime charges? Is indefinite detention lawful? Can the U.S. ever lawfully kill a U.S. citizen in a foreign state with which we are not at war? Such questions are the subject of the course. It is not a philosophy course, nor is it national security law, nor human rights law, although those topics are inextricably related. Our focus is on the law applicable in today’s non-international armed conflict battlefields. Military experience is not required to do well in this course.

Recommended: Completion of International Law I prior to enrollment in this course.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the Law of War Seminar or War Crimes and Prosecutions.

LAW 701 v00 Law, Politics, and Policy in WTO & US Trade Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

International trade rules and practice reflect a complex mix of law, politics and policies. This course will examine the major topics covered by World Trade Organization rules (and some looming future issues) from all three perspectives. This is a fast-changing field. Approximately 25-30 pages are assigned per week from international trade agreements; scholarly journals; government records; newspaper articles; websites and blogs. Interactive exercises draw from international trade agreements; national legislation; and national and international tribunals. Among the invited guest speakers may be U.S. and other government trade officials, business people, and scholars.

Recommended: International Trade; International Trade Law and Regulation; International Trade and the WTO; or World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement.

LAW 697 v00 Managing National Security

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course introduces students to the substance, process, and practice of national security law. The first third of the term is devoted to the structure and process of national security decision-making. The second third of the term introduces students to the instruments of national security policy, e.g., intelligence, the use of force, and homeland defense. The final third of the course is devoted to functional exercises in national security policy with the students playing the roles of national security principals (a.k.a., national security moot court). Each exercise is designed to give students experience in spotting issues and applying law in national security context. The exercises are also intended to give students a feel for the texture and pressure of national security decision-making.

LAW 697 v50 Managing National Security

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course is about the substance, process, and practice of national security law. The course has two segments. The first segment addresses the substance and process of national security decision-making. The second segment covers the tools of national security: intelligence, military, law enforcement, diplomacy, and homeland security. Special attention is paid to the relationship between law and policy and the role of the lawyer in effecting both. Up to 8 J.D. students may enroll in the course for three credits, and prepare a research paper that satisfies the Law Center’s upper-class Writing Requirement (WR). In addition to the final paper, students who select this option must submit an outline and a draft for comment. Both the draft and final papers must be a minimum of 6,000 words (25 pages) and must be supported by substantial independent research. Students may also enroll in the course for two credits. Students electing this option are required to prepare a term-paper approximately 4,800 words (20 pages) on an approved topic.

Recommended: Other national security law courses offered at the Law Center; courses in Constitutional Law; International Law I.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Challenges in National Security Law: A Seminar for Mid-Career LLMs.

Note: This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3 credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

Note: This course will be enrolled via waitlist.

LAW 593 v00 National and Global Health Law: O'Neill Colloquium

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

In this interdisciplinary colloquium, leading national and international scholars in a range of domains will explore fundamental normative and policy problems of contemporary concern in health law. Topics will include health care, public health, global health, science, regulation, politics, ethics, and policy. The colloquium will have participants from across the Georgetown University campus among faculty, senior administration, and students, as well as participants in the Washington health policy and legislative community.

Each seminar session will focus on a presentation by, or structured dialogue with, distinguished guest speakers. Students from the Law Center and other schools within Georgetown University (including Nursing and Health Studies, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, Foreign Service, Business, and other graduate programs) will be expected to prepare for intensive discussions in which experts, faculty and students explore, analyze and deepen their understanding of issues selected for consideration each month. The colloquia will be open to other students and faculty members across Georgetown University as well as interested members of the public, particularly professionals working in health law and policy in Washington.

Note: This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3 credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 922 v01 National Security & the Law of the Sea

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course reviews the basic principles of international law related to the many exclusive and inclusive uses of ocean space, especially on those critical issues affecting U.S. national security. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the legal regimes governing the ocean, from internal waters and other coastal zones through the regimes of the high seas, and an overall appreciation for U.S. ocean law and policy, based on relevant principles of international and national law. Topics include navigation and overflight rights, living and non-living ocean resources, military and law-enforcement activities, protecting the marine environment, marine scientific research, the law of naval warfare, and the formal and informal processes for developing ocean policy and for resolving international disputes. Students will research and engage in class discussions on a number of problems involving national security issues and the use of ocean space, including resources on the continental shelf, maritime terrorism, military exercises, maritime transportation systems, at-sea trafficking in illicit drugs, piracy, weapons of mass destruction, collection of intelligence, and naval rules of engagement

Final exam only.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Oceans Law and Policy.

LAW 972 v00 National Security Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Following the 9/11 attacks, one of the fastest growing areas of legal inquiry has been national security law. This course, taught by the principal founder of the field, is a comprehensive introduction, blending relevant international and national law. It begins with an overview of modern theories about the causes of war including "democratic peace," "deterrence" and "incentive theory." The course then examines the historical development of the international law of conflict management. It takes up institutional modes of conflict management, including the United Nations system and the role of the Security Council. Addressing the lawfulness of using force in international relations, i.e. jus ad bellum, the course discusses aggression, low-intensity conflict, terrorism, intervention, anticipatory defense, and "preemption." It then examines several case studies including the Indochina War, the "secret war" in Central America, the Gulf War, Kosovo, Afghanistan (the War on Terror), and the Iraq War, as well as case studies in United Nations peacekeeping and peace enforcement (including operations in Somalia, Haiti, Rwanda and the former Yugoslav republics). The course examines the norms concerning the conduct of hostilities, i.e. jus in bello, providing an overview of the protection of non-combatants and procedures for implementation and enforcement. It looks at war crimes issues, such as the Nuremberg principles, the new International Criminal Court, and the Yugoslav and Rwanda tribunals. The course briefly discusses American Security Doctrine, then turns to the general issues of strategic stability and arms control, examining nuclear, chemical and biological weapons and their effects, and arms control agreements. The course then examines the institutional framework for the control of national security, including the Authority of Congress and the president to make national security decisions, the war powers, and constitutional issues in the debate on the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty. The course further examines the national security process, including the national command structure, and considers the issues of secrecy, access to information, the classification system and homeland security. It reviews intelligence and counterintelligence law, and ends with a review of individual rights and accountability as they interface with national security. Individual Powerpoint modules are offered in the course segments concerning modern theory about the origins of war, jus ad bellum, terrorism, the Vietnam War, Arms Control intelligence law, individual rights vs. national security, the national security process and homeland security. The course typically invites one or more experts to meet with the class to discuss contemporary issues.

LAW 755 v00 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Law & Policy

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course will provide students with an understanding of the current matrix of nuclear non-proliferation treaties, multilateral arrangements, laws, regulations, initiatives, proposals, and organizations that aim to halt the spread of nuclear weapons and prevent nuclear terrorism. The goal is to examine the full array of tools employed by the United States to address nuclear proliferation, as well as how the Executive Branch brings these tools to bear through the inter-agency process and its joint efforts with Congress and international partners.  Virtually every element of the nonproliferation toolbox was deployed to address the nuclear programs of Iran and North Korea, so considerable time will be spent examining these critical cases.  We will also examine how the nuclear programs of India and Iraq shook and ultimately altered the nonproliferation regime.  Throughout the course, we will consider nonproliferation efforts in the context of great power strategies, alliance obligations, and regional rivalries, on how these factors influence the decision-making of proliferating countries and countries seeking to prevent proliferation.  A continuing theme in the course will be the evolution of nonproliferation tools over time and the role of and lawyers in that evolution.

LAW 741 v00 Pre-Negotiation Strategies for Cross-Border Transactions

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

As economies globalize and organizations increasingly form cross-border relationships, there should be more focus on problems facing legal practitioners caused by cross-cultural differences. While international transactions comprise of distinct phases, the aim of this course is to explore the importance of pre-negotiation phase of international transactions. The legal training in the United States tend to devote far too little time and attention to the pre-negotiation phase than most of our counterparts from other countries. American lawyers generally want to “dispense with the preliminaries” and “to get down to cases” at the negotiation table. For seasoned lawyers and executives, however, this phase of Pre-negotiation is the most important stage to determine whether they want to negotiate at all and, if so, what they will talk about, and how, when, and where they will do it. Without a proper pre-negotiation phase, one may not get to that negotiation table, let alone explore any dispute resolution mechanisms.

Pre-negotiation phase can be characterized by information-gathering efforts to evaluate the parties’ interests and comprises of a process entailing rational choice to pursue negotiation or not. This course, “Pre-negotiation Strategies,” will attempt to introduce an analytical framework for understanding and formulating culturally responsive legal strategies for international lawyers. This highly interactive class will utilize case studies as well as various international agreements to highlight the importance of evaluating and analyzing the negotiating environment before it actually takes place. The course will address the need for practitioners to research and identify certain cultural mores and behavioral patterns in dealing with an unfamiliar culture as well as examine foreign bureaucracies, foreign laws, and multiple currencies in order to develop cross-culturally sensitive strategies in international transactions.

Active in-class participation and simulations will be required.

Note: First class attendance is strongly encouraged.

LAW 995 v00 Public Health and International Investment Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

The objective of this 1 credit course is to introduce students to the relationship between international laws governing foreign investment and efforts to protect and promote human health. The course will examine the extent to which bilateral investment treaties (BITs) and investment chapters in trade agreements limit domestic regulatory autonomy in the field of public health. International investment law is comprised of over 2500 BITs, which govern the acceptance and treatment of foreign investment. BITs impose various rules limiting the freedom of domestic policy-makers, including rules governing national treatment, most-favoured-nation treatment (principles of non-discrimination), so-called fair and equitable treatment and expropriation of property rights. These rules are increasingly being used by foreign investors, including trans-national corporations, to challenge domestic regulations such as public health measures. For example, a major tobacco company recently filed arbitration claims challenging tobacco packaging regulations introduced by health authorities in Australia and Uruguay.

The course will address:

  1. the theoretical perspectives underlying the international law of investment and the concept of police powers (particularly the power to protect health);
  2. the different types of legal tests used to determine the regulatory legitimacy of a measure as well as the impact of varying standards of proof on analysis of this type;
  3. rules governing expropriation of property rights and the circumstances in which health and environmental health measures might be considered equivalent to expropriation;
  4. rules governing fair and equitable treatment as used in determining the legitimacy of domestic regulatory measures;
  5. rules governing non-discrimination and their potential impact on domestic health measures that are non-discriminatory in form;
  6. rules governing arbitrary or discriminatory measures; and
  7. procedural issues relating to the participation of civil society in the negotiation of investment treaties and the settlement of investment disputes.

Prerequisite: Familiarity with international law or global health law is desirable, but not required.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

The take-home exam in this course may be administered mid-semester and the specific exam date will be provided by the professor after the add/drop period.

LAW 785 v00 Regional Trade Agreements: The Changing Landscape of International Rules and Policies in the Americas and Beyond

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The goal of the course is to provide with an in-depth understanding of the most recent regional and bilateral trade agreements in the context of the international trade law system and the interplay of regional arrangements with multilateral rules. Students will acquire knowledge and insights on policies and rules to undertake specialized private practice or government service to handle complex and develop critical thinking regarding the most current trade issues. The course encourages students to develop skills to engage in the preparation and presentation of trade briefings and policy notes dealing with ongoing cases and trade negotiations and disputes. 

The course offers students the opportunity to engage in open guided analytical discussions on the major legal and economic issues of regional trade arrangements (RTAs) and trade negotiations with a special focus on the Americas and their links within the Western hemisphere and with other regions around the world.

Special attention is devoted the most relevant negotiations and other global impactful events on the trade fields such as the NAFTA negotiations. The seminar will also discuss the linkages between RTAs and the current trade policy developments (e.g. Asia Pacific, Transatlantic) at the multilateral, regional and national level and how they are affecting trade integration in the Americas and beyond.

Topics that will be covered in this course are trade in agriculture, industrial products, services and investment, market access, trade remedies, intellectual property, competition and dispute settlement and other topics such as environment, labor and digital trade.

The analysis and discussions in class will be based on treaty text, jurisprudence and the practical, hands-on experience of the professors. Guest-speakers – including practitioners, government officials, or staff from relevant international organizations – will be invited to a few sessions.

Students will be asked to participate in class presentations and/or group exercises on the topics covered, for example on a hypothetical case study of exports/imports, taking up the role of advisors based in either the importing country or the exporting country. They are also encouraged to bring to the discussion resources and points of view beyond those recommended.

Students will be required to write a take-home exam of maximum 10 pages long (double space). Class attendance, oral presentation, and class participation will be part of the overall evaluation.

Prerequisite: for J.D. students only: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent of International Law I, which is a 3 credit course in public international law).

Note: This course is limited to LL.M. students and students in the final year of their JD program.

LAW 1071 v00 Reproductive Health and International Human Rights Law (Project-Based Practicum)

J.D. Practicum | 4 credit hours

In a project-based practicum course, students participate in a weekly seminar and work on a project under the supervision of their professor. This project-based practicum course will focus on the interaction between international human rights law and reproductive health and rights.  Students will participate in a two hour/week seminar and carry out 10 hours/week of project work under the direction of the course professor.

SEMINAR: The seminar will begin by providing an overview of international human rights law as it pertains to reproductive rights. The course will then focus on access to reproductive health from an international perspective, examining States’ obligations on a variety of issues, such as maternal mortality and coerced sterilization. Analyzing recent decisions emerging from regional and international human rights bodies, such as the European Court of Human Rights, the Inter-American Commission and Court on Human Rights and the CEDAW Committee (UN Committee on the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women), the seminar component will provide a solid legal foundation for students to develop their experiential/field placement projects.

PROJECT WORK: Students will work with external partners on legal and policy projects related to reproductive health. Some of the projects may include drafting amicus briefs for cases currently pending before international bodies, and drafting briefs assessing a particular State's compliance with human rights law regarding sexual and reproductive rights to be filed in front of UN bodies (shadow reports). Through these projects, students will learn how to conduct an analysis of existing legal and regulatory frameworks for sexual and reproductive health from a human rights perspective. Students will also learn how to use epidemiological data to support and craft compelling human rights law arguments for advancing public policy on, for example, maternal mortality and sexual violence prevention and eradication. By working with external civil society organizations, the course will give students the opportunity to develop practical projects using international human rights law to advocate for the advancement of reproductive health rights. In the past, external partners have included organizations working on women's rights issues, such as: the Center for Reproductive Rights, Women’s Link Worldwide, Human Rights Watch (Women’s Rights Division), IPAS, and Southern Africa Litigation Centre, among others.

Prerequisite: J.D. students must complete the required first-year program prior to enrolling in this course (part-time and interdivisional transfer students may enroll prior to completing Criminal Justice, Property, or their first-year elective).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not concurrently enroll in this practicum course and a clinic or another practicum course. Students may concurrently enroll in this practicum course and an externship.

Note: This practicum course is open to LL.M. students, space permitting. Interested LL.M. students should email the Office of the Registrar (lawreg@georgetown.edu) to request admission.

Evening students who work during the day are encouraged to reach out to the professor to discuss whether this practicum course would be compatible with their schedules.

This is a four credit course. Two credits will be awarded for the two-hour weekly seminar and two credits will be awarded for approximately 10 hours of supervised project work per week, for a minimum of 11 weeks. Both the seminar and the project work will be graded.

Students who enroll in this course will be automatically enrolled in both the seminar and project components and may not take either component separately. After Add/Drop, a student who wishes to withdraw from a practicum course must obtain permission from the faculty member and the Assistant Dean for Experiential Education. The Assistant Dean will grant such withdrawal requests only when remaining enrolled in the practicum would cause significant hardship for the student. A student who is granted permission to withdraw will be withdrawn from both the seminar and project components.

Default attendance rule for all practicum courses (unless the professor indicates otherwise): Regular and punctual attendance is required at all practicum seminars and fieldwork placements. Students in project-based practicum courses are similarly required to devote the requisite number of hours to their project. If a student must miss seminar, fieldwork, or project work, he or she must speak to the professor as soon as possible to discuss the absence. Unless the professor indicates otherwise, a student with more than one unexcused absence from the practicum seminar (out of 13 total seminar sessions), or one week of unexcused absences from the fieldwork or project work (out of a total of 11 weeks of fieldwork or project work), may receive a lower grade or, at the professor’s discretion, may be withdrawn from the practicum course.

LAW 260 v02 Research Skills in International and Comparative Law

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This two-credit course will instruct students in understanding the relationship between the sources of public and private international law in a theoretical sense with their actual embodiment in tangible and electronic media. Comparative law bibliography and sources will be covered, as will selected jurisdictions in the civil law tradition. With regard to locating legislation and jurisprudence, students will learn which topics are usually covered in a civil code, and how to deal with problems of language and translation. Separate, in-depth sources will be explored for one or more of the following: international criminal law, international environmental law, international human rights, international trade law and arbitration, commercial law and intellectual property, family law as an international and comparative law topic, and documentation for intergovernmental organizations, chiefly the United Nations bodies, regional organizations, and the European Union. Grading will be based on weekly in-class or homework assignments that allow the student to use and evaluate the various sources; a brief oral presentation on a foreign legal system; and a final research guide on an international law topic or an international organization.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the International and Foreign Legal Research Seminar or Legal Research and Communication Theory in International and Foreign Law.

LAW 260 v03 Research Skills in International and Comparative Law

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

This short course will familiarize students with the sources of public and private international law and their embodiment in tangible and electronic media. Comparative law bibliography and sources will be covered, as will selected jurisdictions in the civil law tradition. Students will learn which topics are usually covered in a civil code, and how to deal with problems of language and translation when researching foreign legislation and jurisprudence. In addition, in-depth sources will be explored for a variety of specialized topics, such as international criminal law, international environmental law, international human rights law, international trade law and arbitration, transnational commercial law and intellectual property disputes, and comparative family law. Documentation for intergovernmental organizations, chiefly the United Nations bodies, regional organizations, and the European Union, will be covered as well. Grading will be based on weekly homework assignments that allow the student to use and evaluate the sources discussed in class and on a final project consisting of a research guide on an international law topic, an international organization or the law of a foreign jurisdiction.

Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in International Law I: Introduction to International Law.

Note: In Spring 2017, this class will meet on the following Thursdays: 1/19, 1/26, 2/2, 2/9, 2/16, 3/2, and 3/9.

Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 260 v04 Research Skills in International and Comparative Law

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Whether they are representing couples in transnational adoptions or multinational enterprises in cross-border mergers, legal practitioners increasingly are expected to consult international and foreign legal materials. This course will familiarize students with the best tools for researching international law and the domestic law of jurisdictions outside the U.S., enabling them to approach these tasks with confidence, rather than trepidation. Students will learn how to efficiently locate multilateral and bilateral treaties, decisions issued by international tribunals, documentation produced by the United Nations and other international organizations, as well as legislation and case law from selected foreign jurisdictions, including the European Union. Tools for topical research in specialized fields, such as human rights, international trade, and investor-state arbitration, also will be covered. Students will refine their information-gathering skills through a series of in-class research exercises and take-home quizzes based on real world, practice-oriented scenarios. This course will be especially beneficial for journal editors, students participating in the Jessup International Moot Court competition and other international competitions, and for students interested in pursuing careers in international law or in practicing law outside their home jurisdiction.

Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in International Law I: Introduction to International Law.

LAW 1653 v00 Resolution of International Financial Crises Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Overview

While the globalization of private capital markets has generated important welfare gains, it has also been responsible for episodes of financial instability, often with devastating consequences. The Course will analyze the underlying causes of international financial crises and assess the efforts of policy makers to mitigate their impact. The Course will be interdisciplinary in nature, focusing on the legal, financial and economic dimensions of these crises and the relevant policy responses. Key lessons will be distilled from an in-depth analysis of the most important episodes, including the Latin American Debt Crisis, the Asian Financial Crisis, Argentina’s default in 2001 and the crises precipitated by the Great Recession of 2008, including the Eurozone Crisis. We will also conduct a simulation, with students playing the roles of the various policy makers seeking to contain and ultimately resolve the crisis.

The Course will analyze both the common patterns of the previous international financial crises and the extent to which they have differed. In that context, the Course will investigate how the dynamics of these crises have been driven both by the evolution of credit markets (including the transition from bank lending to bond issuance) and changes in the underlying legal framework that supports these markets. The Course will analyze the competing considerations faced by policy makers as they seek to mitigate the impact of a crisis – often with large scale financial assistance – without increasing the risk of future crises through the creation of excessive moral hazard. In that context, the Course will review in some detail the role played by the International Monetary Fund in managing these crises.      

Learning Objectives

By the end of the course, students will have gained an understanding of how global financial markets have evolved over the past 40 years and how this evolution has both promoted welfare and created significant financial instability. They will learn how the relevant legal frameworks have interacted with this evolution to shape creditor incentives, with a focus on regulatory design, contractual provisions and litigation strategies. Through in-depth case studies, they will gain insight into how public policy makers have struggled to both contain the impact of these crises while, at the same time, introducing reforms to prevent them from recurring. In particular, they will gain an understanding of the legal, policy and governance framework of the IMF and the role it plays as a financial fire fighter. More generally, they will gain an understanding of the challenges faced by policy makers when addressing a systemic crisis, with a focus on the key actors, namely: (a) the governments of the countries experiencing the crisis, (b) private creditors and (c) the IMF. Existing and former officials will participate in a number of classes to share their own perspectives regarding the key lessons to be distilled from previous episodes.

LAW 403 v04 Rule of Law and the Administration of Justice

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course offers students an opportunity to learn about the expanding field of practice focused on strengthening the Rule of Law. It begins with a review of various definitions of the term, recognizing that many approach the same end through various means. It employs a case study methodology, including specific sessions with U.S. and foreign judges and other legal practitioners active in reform efforts. Topics include: Democracy and the rule of law; access to justice; criminal procedural reform; court administration and case management; commercial court reform; alternative dispute resolution (ADR); judicial independence and accountability; national security and transitional justice; indicators to measure the rule of law; and the role played by legal actors in addressing corruption, both within and outside the legal system. We will consider the rationale behind rule of law reforms by examining experiences, including in the U.S., which seek more competitive market economies, stronger law enforcement, gender equality, or social justice in response to an increase in demand populations, not only formal "users" of justice services. The course will also address the often overlapping or inconsistent agendas of bilateral donors, international organizations (e.g., U.N., World Bank, IMF, USAID, U.S. Military, among others) in the discussion and analysis.

Learning Objectives:

  • At the end of the course. Students will have acquired an understanding of the various definitions of ‘rule of law’ and the factors leading to and preventing successful reform efforts.
  • At the end of the course, students will have acquired some understanding of the differences and similarities among international financial institutions (IFIs) and their approaches to Rule of Law to be able distinguish varying objectives (e.g. democracy promotion, economic development, human rights and social justice, anti-corruption and law enforcement).
  • At the end of the course, students will have acquired a vocabulary and understanding of overlapping (and even inconsistent agendas) to be able to identify the “drivers” of reform and provide inputs for the design or evaluation of Rule of Law reform efforts.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law is suggested but not required. Familiarity with international organizations would be useful but not required.

Note: Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 373 v00 Seminar on Humanitarian Crises

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This research seminar will provide an opportunity to critically examine a number of humanitarian crises, including Afghanistan, Bosnia, Colombia, Haiti (earthquake -2010), Iraq, Myanmar, Somalia, South Sudan, Syria, Ukraine, West Africa (Ebola-2014), and Yemen. Each of these crises will be analyzed in terms of: their causes; efforts to prevent, respond to and recover from the crisis; the extent to which international legal frameworks were applied and the impact of the crisis on legal principles; the engagement of different actors (from military forces to local faith-based communities); the extent to which humanitarian principles of neutrality, independence, and impartiality were compromised in humanitarian response; the relationship between refugees, internally displaced persons and ‘trapped populations’ as determinants of international attention; and difficult operational issues around access, negotiations with non-state actors, and the relationship between security concerns and humanitarian response.

Prior to the first class, law students must read the 1951 Refugee Convention and a very short excerpt, pp. 30-39, from a chapter by Andrew Schoenholtz on "Improving Legal Frameworks" in The Uprooted: Improving Humanitarian Responses to Forced Migration (2005).

Recommended: At least one course in Refugee Law, International Human Rights Law, or International Humanitarian Law. 

Note: See the schedule of courses on the Main Campus Registrar's website for room assignments. Law Center students may register only through the Law Center's registration system.

This seminar requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the 3 credit WR section of the seminar (LAWJ-373-09) if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 415 v00 Strategic Intelligence and Public Policy Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This seminar explores several significant legal and policy concerns raised by the conduct of foreign intelligence activities. We will consider the disclosures of Edward Snowden and their impact on the balancing of national security and privacy, the congressional authorization for foreign intelligence surveillance and the operation of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. We will review the role of Congress and the executive branch in intelligence oversight. We will consider the investigation and prosecution of espionage, using the Aldrich Ames and other recent cases as examples, including the Classified Information Procedures Act and the state secrets privilege. We will examine the authority for, and controls on, covert action and its role in the conduct of foreign policy, and compare the role of military special operations. We will use one class to examine the Law of Armed Conflict and International Humanitarian Law. And we will discuss the problems of cyber-security with a senior corporate officer from a major military industrial company. The class will be structured as an ongoing conversation on these and related topics.

LAW 846 v00 Tax Treaties

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

International tax treaties determine why hedge funds are located where they are, how motion pictures are financed, whether the dispatch of employees abroad is economical, and why financial assets follow prescribed international paths. They determine why Netherlands and Luxembourg have a large positive balance of trade with the United States, and why recording studios are established in the Caribbean. They determine whether bank accounts in Switzerland and Liechtenstein are really secret. While tax treaties ostensibly are only about dividing up tax bases between countries and exchanging information between sovereigns, in reality they channel the flow of investment and development in the global economy.

This course assumes that students have some familiarity with basic tax treaty concepts and examines how provisions of the OECD Model Treaty and the United States Model Treaty are used by tax practitioners to achieve specific business objectives. Students will acquire an understanding of how treaty provisions help shape economic and financial decisions in different industries and economic sectors. The course uses examples drawn from actual practice to illustrate the creative use of tax treaty provisions. It is designed to be an interactive experience, with students working on case studies, discussing alternative approaches, and using different jurisdictions and changes in the form of the underlying transaction to achieve desirable tax results.

Learning objectives:

This course is intended to teach the concepts underlying the United States Model Tax Treaty and the OECD Model Tax Treaty. By the end of the course, students are expected to understand how tax treaties are organized and be able to apply the model tax treaties to factual situations in which the tax treaties are applicable.

At the same time, the course is intended to challenge the student to be aware of the ethical challenges and risks of practice in the area of international taxation. More and more, tax authorities are not only looking to penalize a taxpayer for improper tax planning, but also the tax advisor who recommended the course of action followed by the taxpayer. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to understand where the borders of ethical behavior are when developing international tax structures and to be able to analyze risks to the clients and themselves when working in this area.

Finally, the course is intended to reinforce principles of close reading and attention to the specific wording used in the tax treaties and cases interpreting the tax treaties. By the end of the course, students are expected to be able to read and understand why specific words are used in tax treaties and the significance of these words.

Prerequisite: One course in international taxation.

Note: This course is open to J.D. students by professor permission. Interested students should contact Professor De Vos via email at ld57@law.georgetown.edu no later than December 1, 2021 for permission to take this class.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 897 v00 Tax Treaties

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This is a basic tax treaty course. It will cover fundamental tax treaty concepts such as residency, permanent establishment, business profits, limitation on benefits, and relief from double taxation (including operation of the U.S. foreign tax credit rules). There will be an overview of treaty provisions that apply to investment income and income from the performance of services. In addition, students will learn about the interaction of tax treaties with U.S. domestic tax law, the role of international organizations in interpreting tax treaties, procedures for resolving tax treaty disputes through the competent authority process, and strategies for researching tax treaties. This course is designed for students with little or no background in tax treaties. However, students will be expected to have a basic understanding of the U.S. tax rules that apply to foreign persons who receive income from the United States and U.S. persons who receive income from abroad. The course will be based primarily on the United States Model Income Tax Convention, together with selected case law and administrative authority. We will also look at selected provisions of the OECD Model Tax Convention.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I) and prior or concurrent enrollment in one course in international taxation.

LAW 1654 v00 The IMF and the Evolution of International Financial and Monetary Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

The IMF is an institution that is well known, but perhaps less well understood. The course will analyze the IMF’s legal and institutional framework and assess the role that it has played in shaping the evolution of international financial and monetary law since its establishment over 70 years ago.  The course will be interdisciplinary in nature, focusing on the legal, financial, economic, and governance aspects of this influential – and often controversial – institution.

The IMF is unique among international organizations in terms of the breadth of its powers: regulatory, financial and advisory. With respect to its regulatory authority, the course will analyze the IMF’s role in overseeing the fixed exchange rate system that was established in 1945 and assess how the IMF’s jurisdiction in this area has evolved since the collapse of that system in 1971. Regarding its financial powers, the Course will review the legal and policy dimensions of IMF conditionality and assess the IMF’s often controversial role as a “financial fire fighter”, drawing lessons from the role it played in a number of financial crises, including the Latin American Debt Crisis, the Asian Financial Crisis and the Great Financial Crisis of 2008. With respect to its advisory powers, the course will analyze how the IMF has developed “soft law” in its assessment of the adequacy of policies in a broad range of areas, including bank regulation, fiscal transparency and corporate insolvency. Finally, the Course will review the IMF’s governance structure and, in that context, analyze the challenges it faces to its own legitimacy as it seeks to adjust its voting system to take into account important shifts in relative economic power among its member countries. The release of internal staff papers and Executive Board minutes under the IMF’s transparency policy will enable students to gain a unique understanding of the complexity of the decision-making process within this institution.  

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course, students will have gained an in-depth understanding of the IMF’s regulatory and financial powers, as well as its governance structure. They will also have gained insight into the role the IMF has played in shaping international monetary and financial law in an environment where there has been an increasing unwillingness of countries to surrender sovereignty in this area through substantive treaty obligations. In this context, they will learn about the role that alternative legal frameworks have been played in this area, including procedural law, soft law and private law.  A key objective will be for the students to gain an understanding of how the views regarding the nature of the IMF’s legal authority can be seen as a microcosm of evolving attitudes towards the pooling of national sovereignty. The students’ knowledge of these issues will be enhanced by a close study of internal IMF staff papers, which will enable them to obtain a unique understanding of how legal, financial and economic issues are integrated during the IMF-decision making process. Moreover, through an in-depth analysis of a number of systemic financial crisis, students will gain an appreciation of the competing considerations - and constraints - faced by policy makers in a crisis context. This appreciation will be enhanced by occasional presentations provided by present and former IMF officials who played a lead role during the crises that will be studied.

LAW 3075 v00 Trade Remedies: WTO Framework, National Law and Practice

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Trade remedies are the bread of butter of international trade law, and hence a critical area of study for any aspiring trade lawyer. This course will introduce participants to the three principal types of trade remedies, anti-dumping, countervailing measures and safeguards. The class will explore the role of, and justifications for, trade remedies in the international trading system, the framework set out in the WTO Agreement for their use, and the dispute settlement jurisprudence regarding them. Because trade remedies are a global phenomenon, it will then examine and compare the trade remedy regimes of major users around the world, before zooming in on the specifics of US practice.

The first objective of this course will be to familiarize students with trade remedies, both in term of the WTO framework and in terms of the practice of both the United States and other major user countries. At the same time, the course should help students to gain a better understanding of the WTO Agreement, how that Agreement interacts with the national law and policy of the United States and other WTO Members, and the role that WTO dispute settlement can play in that interaction.   

Prerequisite: An introductory course in International Trade Law and/or WTO Law is highly recommended. 

LAW 1218 v00 Trade, Money, and Trust: The Law and Policy of Globalization Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

Successful management of globalization has emerged as the central challenge of our time. Globalization has been blamed for many of our social and economic problems from inequality to stagnant growth. The international regulatory failures exposed by the financial crisis of 2008-2009 have called into question not only the regulatory framework for financial stability, but also the entire framework of international norms and institutions known as Bretton Woods that have been the pillars of global economic regulation. The accompanying collapse in public trust in government experts and private elites has complicated efforts to address these challenges. Populist candidates have swept elections, particularly in the US and UK, based on platforms to reverse the course of international integration. Meanwhile, China and Russia have doubled down on leaders that embrace a return to state controlled economies and traditional notions of regional hegemony. Are we at an historical turning point characterized by GLEXIT – the abandonment of globalization – or will these challenges lead to a Globalization 2.0?

The purpose of this seminar is to look at the role of international economic law in managing globalization, both in terms of extracting the benefits and in addressing the consequences, particularly those negative effects that have fed the backlash. The focus of the seminar will be on the central regulatory regimes governing international economic activity: trade, monetary, investment, finance, competition, tax, sovereign debt and corruption. We will examine the fundamental character and role of legal norms, regulatory systems and international institutions in a world characterized by interdependence and conflict.

This is a research seminar in which the initial eight weekly classes will present a survey of regulatory regimes designed to give students a framework for what have historically been somewhat distinct “silos” but which each illustrate the recurring tensions between fragmentation and coherence. We invite student involvement in the specific topics in the field on which we focus. Each student will be asked to provide short papers responding to the readings for each of the initial sessions. Students will be expected to write a research paper on a relevant topic under the guidance of one of the professors and to make a short presentation to the class during the last third of the course. In their research paper, students will be expected to identify a contemporary, global economic regulatory issue and propose solutions drawing on insights from the seminar (and their broader studies) to analyze the problem, propose and defend possible solutions.

The seminar will be taught by professors with a wide range of experience in academia, private practice and government service. Distinguished outside experts will also be called upon to address particular topics within this framework. 

A number of broad themes will be developed to help unravel the complexity of global regulation:

  • What is the role of legal norms in creating efficient and sustainable global markets? Do some problems lend themselves to different types of norms (e.g. soft versus hard law)? What about governance, the formality of legal norms (and institutions) and the role of national sovereignty and subsidiarity?
  • Why do the different global economic regulatory regimes look so different? Why has trade evolved with an advanced set of norms, dispute settlement and enforcement?
  • How have crises and systemic failures contributed to the development of legal regimes? Do crises lead to sustainable and effective regulatory regimes?
  • What role does trust play in the character of legal regimes? Can international economic law be viewed as the objectification of trust? How can trust be sustained when global issues engage citizenry across the most diverse context imaginable?

Recommended: Students may want to familiarize themselves with basic principles of international economic law and areas of international regulation such as international trade, investment and financial regulation. The seminar will include both JD and LLM students and we encourage students with a range of exposure to the underlying subject matter. For insight into the kinds of issues the seminar will address, students are encouraged to review the material in Cottier, Jackson and Lastra, International Law in Financial Regulation and Monetary Affairs, Oxford University Press (2012). Students may also find useful the PBS Documentary, The Ascent of Money; A Financial History of the World, written and presented by Niall Ferguson which is available online at http://www.pbs.org/show/ascent-of-money/.

LAW 766 v01 Transitional Justice: Theory and Practice

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

In the wake of historical trauma – dictatorship, revolution, civil war, mass atrocity, genocide, and other crisis moments in the life of a nation – law and society begin the process of grappling with the past and laying a foundation for the future. From the Nuremberg Trials to Rwanda’s gacaca courts, and from Argentina’s amnesty laws to the International Criminal Court, this course uses historical and contemporary case studies to gain a better understanding of whether and how various mechanisms of transitional justice have contributed to such goals as peace, justice, and reconciliation.

Prerequisite: International Law or equivalent. Please note that exceptions may be granted, especially if students have prior professional experience in the field of international human rights or international law. 

LAW 780 v01 U.S. and International Customs Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

As international trade and commerce have increased over the years, customs law has become increasingly more internationalized, important and complex. This course will examine and provide a basic introduction to the rules and principles relating to both U.S. and international customs law. This will include an examination of those rules and principles relating to tariff classification, customs valuation, rules of origin, border enforcement of intellectual property rights and regional trading arrangements. International efforts to facilitate trade and to harmonize and simplify customs laws and procedures will also be examined together with international organizations dealing with customs laws and procedures (such as the World Trade Organization and the World Customs Organization).

Customs authorities are the guardians of national borders. The role of customs authorities in combating terrorism and criminal activity and in securing and safeguarding national borders will also be examined.

No prerequisites.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Customs Law.

LAW 962 v03 U.S. Export Controls and Economic Sanctions

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Understanding and dealing with U.S. export control and sanction laws have become increasingly important skills for lawyers advising clients who compete in the global economy, including manufacturers, service enterprises, financial institutions, and companies licensing their technology abroad. This course surveys the federal laws and implementing regulations governing the export and re-export of goods, services, technology and software from the United States or by persons subject to U.S. jurisdiction, the extraterritorial reach of re-export controls, prosecution strategies, restrictions on dealings with or in sanctioned countries, prohibitions against dealing with blacklisted parties, and other sanctions that apply to non-U.S. companies and individuals. We also will examine the policies underlying these rules, which are designed to address ever-changing and developing threats to the United States, including Russian aggression in the Ukraine, the nuclear threat posed by Iran, civil war in Syria, missile development in North Korea, and conventional military tensions between the United States and China.

The course is designed to impart the practical skill sets you will need to use and understand the various complex regulatory systems that implement national security rules related to technology and high-tech transfers, including restrictions on release of technology to non-U.S. persons, foreign policy restrictions and licensing requirements. The regulations are implemented under various statutes, such as the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, Trading with the Enemy Act, Arms Export Control Act, and Atomic Energy Act, and regulations issued by various federal agencies, including the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Treasury, State, and Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. We will address each regulatory regime as well as the limited body of relevant case law.

In addition, the course will address multilateral export control regimes, the role they play in shaping U.S. trade laws, the impact of new regimes (such as those under the Chemical Weapons Convention) and the direction of U.S. export controls and sanctions policy in response to the changing threats. We will focus on the U.S. Government’s use of embargoes and other economic sanctions to achieve national security and foreign policy goals of target countries. This course also will provide the skill sets necessary to communicate effectively with licensing agencies and the Defense Department regarding key issues of agency jurisdiction and classification and how these issues affect direct investment in the United States as regulated by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States.

The course also will focus on the enforcement environment, including the trend of ever-increasing fines, the use of extradition, and imprisonment. We will discuss defense strategies and the potential for global settlements with the Departments of Justice, State, Treasury, and Commerce.

Finally, the course will emphasize developing the working knowledge necessary for hands-on practice and problem-solving in this field. In addition, the course will provide skills sets to assess proposed legislation and regulations in depth, as well as advocacy skills related to legislation and rulemaking.

Recommended: Administrative Law; International Law I.

LAW 986 v01 U.S. International Inbound Tax

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Concentrates on the U.S. taxation of foreign persons and foreign investments in the United States. The course covers the U.S. taxation of passive and business income of nonresident aliens and foreign corporations, the source rules, the principles and application of U.S. tax treaties, special rules governing foreign investment in U.S. real estate and other business, cross border financing transactions, the base erosion and anti-abuse tax, and tax planning possibilities involved in the foregoing.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I) and either prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporate Taxation (formerly Taxation II) or Corporate Income Tax I.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. course International Tax Law or U.S. Taxation of International Transactions.

Note: Required for U.S. trained students pursuing the Certificate in International Taxation.

LAW 881 v00 U.S. Taxation of International Transactions

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

The course will address the principal elements of the U.S. taxation of international transactions, including trade, investment and labor. The initial portion of the course will address the way in which individual and corporate foreign taxpayers are taxed in the United States. The second portion of the course will deal with the way in which U.S. individual and corporate taxpayers are taxed on income earned in other countries. The impact of tax treaties will be addressed in both portions of the course.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I) or equivalent from home country. Strongly recommended for U.S.-trained students: A prior or concurrent course in the taxation of corporations and shareholders.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students who take this course may not enroll in U.S. International Inbound Tax (formerly U.S. Taxation of Foreign Persons in the United States) or U.S. International Outbound Tax (formerly: U.S. Taxation of Domestic Persons outside the United States), or International Tax Law. Students who have taken any of these or are currently enrolled in these three courses may not enroll in this course.

Note: Required for foreign-trained Tax LL.M. students pursuing the Certificate in International Taxation.

LAW 881 v01 U.S. Taxation of International Transactions

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

The course will address the principal elements of the U.S. taxation of international transactions, including both the way in which individual and corporate foreign taxpayers are taxed in the United States (Inbound Taxation) and the way in which U.S. individual and corporate taxpayers are taxed on income earned in other countries (Outbound Taxation). The impact of transfer pricing rules and tax treaties will be addressed in both portions of the course.

Prerequisite: Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I) and prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporate Taxation (formerly Taxation II) or Corporate Income Tax Law I.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students who take this course may not enroll in U.S. International Inbound Tax (formerly: U.S. Taxation of Foreign Persons in the United States) or U.S. International Outbound Tax (formerly: U.S. Taxation of Domestic Persons outside the United States), or International Tax Law. Students who have taken any of these or are currently enrolled in these three courses may not enroll in this course.

Note: Required for foreign-trained Tax LL.M. students pursuing the Certificate in International Transactions.

Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 937 v01 War Crimes & Prosecutions

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

This course focuses on international war crimes and legal actions taken against war crimes violators. Using such topics as the abuse allegations as irregular rendition, the trial of Saddam Hussein, the arrest warrant for Omar Al-Bashir, the Armenian Genocide, and other events, the course will explore in depth topics such as the principal international war crimes, universal jurisdiction and issues surrounding jurisdiction to conduct war crimes trials, civil remedies for war crimes under the Alien Tort Statute, who should conduct war crimes trials, and other matters. Students will be expected to write a paper, approximately 12-15 pages, on a topic of their choosing pertaining to war crimes, and to participate in class discussions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this seminar and Law of War, Law of War Seminar, or War Crimes, Terrorism and International Criminal Procedure.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 1075 v00 Women and Immigration (Fieldwork Practicum)

J.D. Practicum | 4 credit hours

In fieldwork practicum courses, students participate in weekly seminars and conduct related fieldwork at outside organizations. This fieldwork practicum course will focus on government protection for women fleeing gender-based persecution and abuse. Students will participate in a two hour/week seminar and carry out 10 hours/week of fieldwork for private law firms and nonprofit agencies located in the D.C. metro area that are representing women fleeing their countries because of gender-related violence.

SEMINAR: In the two-credit, graded, seminar portion of the practicum, students will discuss how shifting migration patterns and societal forces have caused more women to leave their home countries and attempt to enter the United States. While a woman may flee her home country for the same reasons as a man, research shows that refugee women also flee their countries for gender-related reasons. In many countries, women face persecution and violence just for being women. This includes the use of rape as a weapon of war, domestic violence, so-called honor crimes, forced marriage, widow rituals, one child policies, forced sterilization policies, and female genital mutilation. In seminar, students will study and learn through experience about the societal forces causing the forced migration of women and how U.S. laws and policies address the immigration status of these female immigrants. We will focus on forms of relief that, while available to both men and women, are almost exclusively accessed by women to obtain legal status in the United States. Specifically, we will focus on: Asylum (specifically the gender-based prong of “membership in a particular social group”), the Violence against Women Act (for abused women who are or were married to U.S. citizens), U Visas (for victims of crime), and T Visas (for victims of trafficking).

FIELDWORK: In the two-credit, mandatory pass/fail, fieldwork portion of the practicum, students will work with lawyers from private law firms and nonprofit agencies on actual cases of women fleeing their countries because of gender-based violence. Students will be assigned in teams to interview clients, prepare research and briefs, and assist the principal lawyer conducting the case. Students will also work directly with attorneys at local legal services agencies who are representing female survivors of gender-based harm seeking legal status in the United States.

Prerequisite: J.D. students must complete the required first-year program prior to enrolling in this course (part-time and interdivisional transfer students may enroll prior to completing Criminal Justice, Property, or their first-year elective).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not concurrently enroll in this practicum and an externship or a clinic or another practicum course.

Note: LL.M students may enroll in this course, space permitting, provided they have excellent U.S.-based legal research skills, English language, and writing ability. Interested LL.M. students should email the Office of the Registrar (lawreg@georgetown.edu) to request admission.

This course is suitable for evening students who can commit to working 10 hours/week (during business hours) for private law firms and nonprofit agencies.

Students are responsible for organizing their own transportation to meet clients in the D.C. metro area, which includes clients in Virginia.

PLEASE NOTE: There will be two class sessions in the first week – one at the regularly scheduled Tuesday meeting time and the second on Wednesday from 3:00-5:00 p.m. FIRST AND SECOND CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. All enrolled and waitlisted students must be in attendance at the first and second class sessions in order to be eligible for a seat in the class, and must attend both class sessions in their entirety. Due to the case and team structure of this practicum, students may only drop this class up until the start of the second class session on Wednesday, January 19. After that time, students will only be permitted to drop the class with permission of the Professor and the Assistant Dean for Experiential Education AND only when remaining in the practicum course would cause significant hardship to the student.

This is a four credit course. Two credits will be awarded for the two-hour weekly seminar and two credits for approximately 10 hours of fieldwork per week, for a minimum of 11 weeks, to be scheduled with the faculty. The two-credit seminar portion will be graded. The two credits of fieldwork are mandatory pass/fail. Students will be allowed to take another course pass/fail in the same semester as this practicum.

Students who enroll in this course will be automatically enrolled in both the seminar and fieldwork components and may not take either component separately. A student wishing to withdraw from the course will be withdrawn from both the seminar and fieldwork components.

Default attendance rule for all practicum courses (unless the professor indicates otherwise): Regular and punctual attendance is required at all practicum seminars and fieldwork placements. Students in project-based practicum courses are similarly required to devote the requisite number of hours to their project. If a student must miss seminar, fieldwork, or project work, he or she must speak to the professor as soon as possible to discuss the absence. Unless the professor indicates otherwise, a student with more than one unexcused absence from the practicum seminar (out of 13 total seminar sessions), or one week of unexcused absences from the fieldwork or project work (out of a total of 11 weeks of fieldwork or project work), may receive a lower grade or, at the professor’s discretion, may be withdrawn from the practicum course.

LAW 872 v00 World Trade Organization: Agreements, Negotiations & Disputes

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The course analyzes the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its agreements, including the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), and the substance and status of negotiations to amend the agreements. It concentrates on the coverage of the agreements, based on their text and interpretive guidance from key dispute settlement decisions. The course also reviews the relevant economic, policy and legal aspects of the international trading system.

LAW 703 v00 WTO & Public International Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Since the institution of the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Understanding in 1994, WTO

jurisprudence has increasingly addressed disputes involving the interaction between trade related values and other domestic or international policy values. The various WTO instruments that are subject to the discipline of the Dispute Settlement Understanding address the relationships between international trade and other fields such as public health, the environment, intellectual property, and even public morality. The treatment of these issues in the WTO Agreements simultaneously demonstrates the linkages among these fields, and the separation of each from the others. Moreover, many of these “trade-related but not trade” policy areas are covered by other international agreements and understandings, as well as by domestic laws, and are in some cases subject to different judicial or quasi-judicial dispute resolution mechanisms, each applying its own rules of decision. Finally, even within the international trade arena, the proliferation of regional trade arrangements with their own dispute settlement mechanisms presents another

potential source of conflict with the jurisprudence of the WTO.


This state of affairs has, since about 1995, given rise to serious concerns over what has been termed the “fragmentation” of international law. Although abstract, the question of whether international law should be viewed as a “system” of law, or merely as an aggregation of rules formed principally by agreements between sovereign states, has become one of more than theoretical interest. The resolution of actual or potential conflicts between various specialized international regimes, as well as between such regimes and domestic legal regimes, has become of increasing practical importance. In many respects, WTO jurisprudence stands at the heart of these developing concerns.


This course will examine the jurisprudence of the WTO through the lens of the issue of

fragmentation. Through a close study of relevant decisions and hypothetical disputes, the course will address actual and potential regime conflict issues between the international trade regime and competing norms in the environmental, public health, and intellectual property spheres. It will also address the challenges to the integrity of general international law, and of the WTO regime itself, that are posed by the proliferation of regional trade regimes with their own dispute settlement mechanisms, and by emerging questions about the effect of WTO norms within domestic legal regimes. The course will seek to balance a case-driven approach to these issues with a consideration of the underlying theoretical questions, and will regularly return to the question of the future role of the WTO in the new world order of international law.

Recommended: Prior exposure to WTO law, or concurrent enrollment in a basic course in WTO law.