International Arbitration & Dispute Resolution Certificate

LAW 2073 v00 Advanced International Commercial Arbitration

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course will provide an indepth study of specific topics in international commercial arbitration from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Topics to be considered will include:

  1. the arbitration agreement - the separability doctrine, choice of law, parties to the agreement (including non-signatory issues), competence-competence, enforcement of the agreement and other types of national court intervention;
  2. complex arbitrations - multiparty and multicontract issues, joinder of parties, consolidation of cases, parallel proceedings;
  3. the arbitral tribunal - selection of arbitrators, duties of arbitrators, independence and impartiality issues, challenges of arbitrators;
  4. the arbitral proceedings - bifurcation, interim measures, evidentiary rules, the conduct of hearings; and
  5. the arbitral award - drafting of awards, enforcement and setting aside of awards, the 1958 New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Awards.

The course will refer to arbitration rules, case law, statutes and international conventions.

Prerequisite: International Commercial Arbitration, Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration, or permission of the instructor.

Mutually Excluded Courses: This course is mutually exclusive with the other spring course by this same name (LAWG/J 888).

Note: Please note, the date for the final class session will be announced at the start of the semester.

LAW 888 v00 Advanced International Commercial Arbitration: Practice Seminar

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

The seminar will be a combination of the theoretical and practical aspects of international commercial arbitration, with an emphasis on the practical. Its centerpiece will be the handling of a mock international arbitration case from the drafting of the arbitration agreement to the drafting of a final award, with units in between on the appointment and challenge of arbitrators, discovery of documents, and a live arbitration hearing. Teams of students will participate (as counsel to the parties) in the negotiation of arbitration agreements, in the drafting of motions and replies, in oral argument on such issues as the disqualification of arbitrators and the production of documents in discovery, in the hearing in a case, and in brief writing. Playing the role of arbitrators, students will also write final arbitral awards.


To the extent time permits, the course will also consider a handful of the many difficult and, to a large extent, still unanswered questions of national and international law that are emerging as the practice of international arbitration expands, including choice of law issues and, particularly in the United States, issues of the relation between federal and state laws.

The course will be limited to 12 students. It will meet once a week for two hours. There will be no final exam.

Prerequisite: A general course in international commercial arbitration. Students not having this precise prerequisite but having had a course in arbitration generally or substantial law practice experience in arbitration may apply for admission to the course by emailing Professor Joelson at joelsonmr@msn.com.

Mutually Excluded Courses: This course is mutually exclusive with the other spring course by this same name (LAWG 2073).

Note: This course does not meet the J.D. writing requirement (WR).

LAW 3018 v00 Advocacy in International Arbitration

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

Students in this small seminar will receive individualized instruction in oral and written advocacy in advanced topics in international arbitration. The scope of instruction will include both procedural and substantive topics. The principle underlying the course is that students will learn by doing.


Enrollment will be based only on professor permission; students should not rank this course in the pre-registration process. Permission will be principally based on the results of a moot court try-out competition.

Recommended: Prior enrollment in an introductory course in international arbitration

Note: Note: This course is only open to LL.M. students. Students must seek professor permission to enroll.

LAW 885 v00 Advocacy in International Arbitration

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course blends mock litigation experiences with class discussion of techniques, strategy, and ethics in international arbitration proceedings. Students directly participate in a series of practical exercises based upon proceedings brought by a foreign investor against a State before the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), including role-playing as litigators and arbitrators. The course emphasizes advocacy in connection with jurisdictional and procedural issues, selecting and challenging arbitrators, limits on the enforceability of awards, and other litigation problems that arise in the globalized environment of international investment and arbitration. There will be a number of oral advocacy assignments throughout the semester. The course grade will be a function of those assignments and class participation.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law

Note: Students participate in in-class exercises and are graded on those exercises and productive class participation. Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 3051 v00 Arbitration in Latin America

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Commercial and investment arbitration have gained increasing importance in Latin America. The last decade has seen, on the one hand, substantial amendments in the arbitration laws of the region and, on the other, an increase in the claims by investors under bilateral investment treaties and free trade agreements. But is there a Latin American arbitration? Is there a common approach to arbitration by the different countries in the region? Have the countries in the region simply adopted international standards and rules, or is there a Latin American contribution to the development of arbitration? Is there a Latin American way of conducting arbitration or rather an increasing adoption of practices and rules more akin to common law traditions? How can lawyers trained in the common-law tradition work in arbitrations subject to the laws of Latin American countries and located in Latin American venues? What have been the effects of the so-called “constitutionalization” of arbitration? Is there a uniform approach of Latin American countries to arbitration under investment treaties? Is there a trend to expand the relevance of local law in investment claims and to insist in the Calvo doctrine? Do human rights or rights of indigenous communities play a role in investment disputes? Where is the debate as to whether the existing investment treaties and the arbitration rules reflect the dominant interests of capital-exporting nations? What have been the defense strategies of Latin American states?

The mere definition of what is Latin America presents a challenge to both lawyers and historicists. This course will explore, with a brief introduction as to the historical differences and common grounds between the countries in the region, the responses to the different questions that arise in a region where the approach to arbitration swings from the magic solution to reduce work overload in courts to a public enemy that should be eliminated.

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory international arbitration course.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 1529 v00 China and International Law

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

Over the past forty years, China has gone from one of the most isolated countries in the world to a major player in international affairs, a leading exporter, and a much more influential voice on regional security matters. Yet even with the rapid economic growth and increased influence that China has achieved over the past several decades, it maintains an ambivalent attitude towards many key aspects of international law and the architecture of global order. This class will explore China’s ambivalent engagement with international law in the context of its increasing prominence as an emerging power, and will in particular look to address the question of how China might adapt to the existing world order, and the ways in which it might look to influence its evolution. The class will cover a range of issues, including China’s membership in the WTO; its engagement with the international human rights regime; China’s approach to international cooperation on issues like global warming and nuclear non-proliferation; and international law aspects of the dispute over the South China Sea; among others.

Learning Objectives:

This class will provide you with a solid understanding of China’s approach to key international law issues, and also a sense of the Chinese government’s views on international law and international legal institutions more generally. By the end of the semester, you should have a sense of how China fits into the existing global legal order, and the ways in which it is seeking to influence or even alter it. In-class discussions will also bring out the ways in which other states have sought to influence Chinese behavior, which will give you a sense of how and when relatively powerful states like China can be convinced to alter their approach to key international law issues.

For students who have not previously taken a class on public international law, this course will serve as a basic introduction to key concepts of international law (although the readings will focus very heavily on the Chinese approach, rather than the underlying law itself); for those who have taken prior international law courses, this course will serve as a useful refresher.

A core goal of the class is to understand international law from the perspective of the Chinese state. In other words, students will develop a sense of why China makes the choices it does on key international law issues, and what values and political and historical dynamics drive its decision-making. In so doing, students will gain insight into a different political-legal culture, and seek to understand how different political-legal systems – including non-democratic ones like China – come to grips with legal questions in ways that may differ markedly from the approach of the U.S. government. At the same time, having taken steps to articulate China’s perspective, students may be able to see more clearly the values and political and historical factors that drive American decisions on key international law issues.

Finally, a core goal of the response papers – above and beyond demonstrating an understanding of the substance of the readings – will be to give students the chance to build their skills at analyzing legal arguments, and in building their own written arguments in response to them. As noted below, response papers will be graded both on the basis of demonstrated mastery of the material, and also on the basis of the successful construction of a persuasive and fact-based argument.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law.

Note: This seminar requires a paper. Students must register for the 3 credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 807 v00 Cross-Border Transactions in Latin America

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

The course is designed to give students an overview and practical insight on the legal aspects of doing business with or investing in Latin America. The course will focus on Mexico, but will also address legal issues associated with doing business in Central and South American countries. Topics will be discussed from the perspective of U.S. investors doing business in the region, and will cover the legal implications of cross-border distribution, licensing and joint venture arrangements, acquisitions and direct investments, labor planning and creditor rights.

Recommended: Contracts, Corporations, and International Business Transactions.

Note: NOTE: In the Fall 2021 semester, this course will take place online via Zoom

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 3074 v00 Current Challenges to Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS)

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

In light of the current debate on ISDS and the many criticisms voiced against the current system, this course will first briefly recall (i) the origins of and reasons for ISDS and (ii) its current legal framework. It will then proceed  to a detailed review of (iii) criticisms expressed against the existing system, such as the lack of consistency of decisions, the lack of transparency of the process, and the lack of legitimacy and accountability of the system and of the arbitrators. It will examine (iv) whether these criticisms are justified, whether and why they matter for international trade and commerce, peaceful international relations, justice and the rule of law.  On this basis, the course will then explore (v) reform options, some of which are currently envisaged by policy-makers and others which still need to be conceived. As a result of this exploration, the students will finally seek to design (vi) a roadmap for possible reform.

Learning Objectives:

Competencies: Revisiting fundamental notions of arbitration in light of current criticisms against investor-state arbitration.

Skills: Investigate merits of criticisms and come up with solutions discussing their pros and cons.

Strategies: Draw up possible reform plan.

Strongly Recommended: Commercial arbitration and/or investment arbitration course.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 014 v01 Current Issues in Transnational (Private International) Law Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

This seminar provides an introduction to the increasingly important field of private international law as well as an opportunity to explore in depth specific issues now under active consideration in the various international and regional organizations working on the development, codification and harmonization of private international law. Beyond the “classic” questions of jurisdiction, choice of law, judicial assistance and enforcement of judgments, we will explore such substantive topics as international sale of goods, cross-border consumer protection, secured transactions, international securities law, international intellectual property, transport of goods by sea, transnational leasing law, dispute settlement mechanisms, international family law (including international adoption, abduction and enforcement of child support and family maintenance), international privacy and data protection, and even wills and trusts in their cross-border contexts. All students will be expected to choose a topic and to research and to present key findings and recommendations to the class.

This course requires a paper and an oral presentation. It is open to J.D. and LL.M. students. For J.D. students who choose the 3 credit “writing seminar” option, the objective will be to research and write analytical papers of publishable quality on discrete topics of current importance in transnational practice. Students will be required to satisfy the WR requirement including (1) selection of a paper topic approved by the professor, (2) submission of an outline, followed by feedback from the professor, (3) submission of a draft paper of at least 6,000 words exclusive of footnotes, followed by feedback from the professor, and (4) submission of a final paper of at least 6,000 words exclusive of footnotes, incorporating the professor’s suggested revisions. The paper must use legal forms of citation, where appropriate.

Learning goals for this course:

Familiarity with substance of "Private International Law"; ability to research effectively in the field; to write coherently and present conclusions orally; to understand relationship between international and domestic law.

Recommended: International Law I.

Note: This course requires a paper. Students must register for the 3 credit section of the course if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement. The paper requirements of the 2 credit section will not fulfill the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 2043 v01 Current Topics in International Investment Arbitration

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

International investment arbitration is a fast moving field, with new issues rapidly becoming pivotal to legal practice.  This weekly seminar will delve into the cutting-edge topics that promise to make a mark on the field.  For the 2021 edition of the course, these hot topics will include, among others, fundamental reform to the international investment dispute resolution system (ISDS), the problem of corruption allegations, and the role of human rights in investment disputes.  The goal of this course is not only to inform students about these emerging issues, but also to give students the analytical tools needed to thrive in a field defined by rapid change.

The course will not rely on a casebook, but instead will use awards and articles to further its goal of exploring emerging issues.   Students are expected to read all of the materials and be prepared to engage in active discussion in each class.  Twenty-five percent of the grade will be based on class participation, twenty-five percent on participation in formal in-class debates during the last week of class, and fifty percent on a final paper (on an issue of the student’s choice) to be submitted at the end of the seminar.  As this is a class on questions for which there are few clear answers, there will be no final exam.

Strongly Recommended: It is recommended that students have completed a course in commercial or investment arbitration prior to the seminar, or otherwise have some experience in arbitration.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

NOTE: For the Fall 2021 semester, mandatory attendance rules will not be enforced for this course; students will not automatically be dropped or withdrawn upon missing a class session. Students who miss class due to COVID-19 symptoms, quarantine, isolation, or other disruptions should contact the professor(s). Regular attendance and participation in all class sessions is expected, and students may be withdrawn, at the request of the faculty, if absent without good cause.

LAW 3082 v00 Dispute Settlement in International Trade: A Comparative Examination of WTO, Regional & Bilateral Systems

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course involves an in-depth look, in a seminar-type setting, at different state-to-state dispute settlement systems in the international trade area.  Although the principal focus will be WTO dispute settlement, the course will also examine the new or re-invigorated mechanisms in regional agreements (e.g., RCEP, CPTPP) and bilateral trade and investment agreements of the United States (USMCA, CAFTA) and the EU (Korea FTA, CAI with China).

It will also look at the special case of the UK/EU TCA, and at investor-state dispute settlement, which is currently subject to significant reform proposals, as a point of comparison with state-to-state mechanisms. In addition to examining the treaty provisions themselves, the course will involve the close reading of arbitral decisions, as a medium to examine real-world systemic issues regarding dispute settlement, such as the function of terms of reference, approaches to treaty interpretation, confidentiality, coherence between different bodies of international law, the role of precedent, standard of review, the scope of appellate review, implementation and compliance, and remedies. At the same time, students will gain familiarity with some of the leading substantive issues in international trade law. 

Recommended: Background in international trade law and in public international law generally.

Strongly Recommended: A introductory course in international trade law is strongly recommended.

LAW 3009 v00 Ethics in International Arbitration

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

This course will consider ethics principles governing the conduct of counsel, arbitrators and expert witnesses in international commercial and investment arbitrations. Topics will include recent developments in the IBA Guidelines on Conflicts of Interest in International Arbitration and the IBA Guidelines on Party Representation in International Arbitration, other soft law instruments such as the ABA/AAA Code of Ethics for Arbitrators in Commercial Disputes, national law regulation of the conduct of arbitrators and counsel in international arbitrations, ethics requirements included in international arbitration rules and ethics requirements for witnesses in international arbitrations, as well as recent ethics-related jurisprudence from ICSID, arbitral institutions and various national courts.

Learning objectives:

This course has the following goals:

  • To enable the student to identify fundamental differences between the ethics obligations of principal participants (arbitrators, counsel and witnesses, particularly expert witnesses) in international arbitrations (involving participants from a multiplicity of States and legal systems and a forum intended to be perceived as neutral and thus largely outside the influence of the particular national legal systems of the parties) and the ethics obligations of principal participants in national judicial systems.
  • To identify the complex regulatory, choice of law and legal culture problems involved in identifying the sources and content of ethics obligations of participants in international arbitrations in light of the diversity of legal and national cultures involved and to compare and contrast with the sources and content of ethics obligations of participants appearing in national courts.
  • To identify possible remedies for breaches by participants in international arbitrations of their ethics obligations (if any) and to compare and contrast with remedies in national courts.

My objective will be to enable students, by the end of the sessions, to be able to:

  • describe the subject areas covered (or not covered) by ethics responsibilities for principal participants (arbitrators, counsel and witnesses) in international arbitration
  • describe how those areas may differ in sources and content, when compared with national court systems,
  • recognize and explain reasons why the ethics responsibilities of participants in international arbitration differ from the ethics responsibilities of similar participants in national court systems
  • describe important uncertainties with respect to ethics obligations of those participants, and
  • apply that learning to advise clients and counterparties on complying with those responsibilities or, when the nature of those responsibilities are uncertain, how to manage the arbitral process in light of those uncertainties.

Recommended: Prior or concurrent course in international commercial or international investment arbitration.

Note: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. 

NOTE: For the Spring 2022 semester, mandatory attendance rules will not be enforced for this course; students will not automatically be dropped or withdrawn upon missing a class session. Students who miss class due to COVID-19 symptoms, quarantine, isolation, or other disruptions should contact the professor(s). Regular attendance and participation in all class sessions is expected, and students may be withdrawn, at the request of the faculty, if absent without good cause.

The required paper for the course is selected from a list prepared by the professor. The paper is too short to be used for other writing requirements in a degree program.

This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students.

LAW 733 v00 Global Commerce and Litigation

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This survey course covers both basic and advanced concepts in the evolving rules governing modern international sales, distribution and investment transactions. The conduct and structure of international litigation that can arise from these transactions, as well as ways to avoid such international litigation, are also examined. Emphasis is on practical problem solving. Specific areas to be covered will include INCOTERMS, the U.N. Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods, payment mechanisms for international sales, international electronic commerce, the structure of international acquisitions, U.S. and European merger notification controls, foreign ownership restrictions, export controls, corruption, and cross-border litigation and arbitration. There will be an open book final exam.

Prerequisite: Contracts (or the equivalent Bargain, Exchange, and Liability) or for foreign-educated LL.M. students, Foundations of American Law, Introduction to U.S. Legal Methods or a Contracts equivalent course from the home country.

LAW 3014 v00 ICSID Arbitration: Jurisdiction and Procedural Aspects

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course will provide students with a practical understanding of an International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes, ICSID, arbitration proceeding from the moment of the submission of a request for arbitration through the issuance of the award and post-award remedies. ICSID is one of the five organizations of the World Bank Group and the arbitral institution most commonly used for the resolution of international investment disputes. ICSID case law has played a major role in the development of modern international investment law.

After a short introduction on the creation of ICSID and its development, students will receive a basic overview of the modern investment treaty regime. The course will then focus primarily on the jurisdictional thresholds that are at the heart of an ICSID arbitration, including the existence of a dispute arising out of an “investment”, nationality requirements, and consent to arbitration under the ICSID Convention. Special procedures, including summary dismissal of the claim under ICSID Arbitration Rule 41(5), provisional measures, intervention of non-disputing parties, such as NGO’s or multilateral organizations in the proceedings, transparency requirements and post-award remedies will also be addressed.

The course may include guest lectures.

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in International Law I.

Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in International Investment Law, Investor-State Dispute Resolution Seminar, Advanced Topics in International Investment Arbitration, Investment Treaty Arbitration, Public International Law and Landmark Judgments of the ICJ, Investor-State Dispute Settlement, Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration, or International Arbitration, if offered during the semester.

LAW 882 v00 International Arbitration

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Examines United States, foreign, and international law and practice relating to international commercial and investment arbitration, including the U.S. Federal Arbitration Act, the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Arbitral Awards, the ICSID Convention, the UNCITRAL Arbitration Rules, and the arbitration rules of major arbitral institutions such as the ICC, the AAA and the LCIA. The course focuses on the procedural law applicable to and the practical aspects of arbitration. It will cover such topics as enforcing arbitration clauses, conducting arbitration proceedings, judicial oversight of arbitration, choice of law, enforcing and setting aside awards, and particular issues arising in arbitrations against sovereigns.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I); International Business Transactions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Commercial Arbitration, Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration, International Arbitration, or the J.D. seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar (CTLS course)

LAW 882 v08 International Arbitration

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Examines United States, foreign, and international law and practice relating to international commercial arbitration, including the U.S. Federal Arbitration Act, the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, and the arbitration rules of major arbitral institutions such as the ICC, JAMS, the ICDR, etc,  The course focuses on the procedural law applicable to and the practical aspects of arbitration. It will cover such topics as enforcing arbitration clauses, conducting arbitration proceedings, judicial oversight of arbitration, choice of law, enforcing and setting aside awards as well as drafting dispute resolution clauses.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I); International Business Transactions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Commercial Arbitration, Introduction to Commercial Arbitration or the J.D. seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar (CTLS course).

LAW 3021 v00 International Arbitration and the New York Convention

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

The New York Convention of 1958 on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards is generally considered as the most important legal cornerstone for international business arbitration. It is also acclaimed to be the most successful international convention in international private law. The New York Convention provides for the international enforcement of arbitration agreements and arbitral awards. There are now 156 Contracting States and more than 1,800 court decisions interpreting and applying the Convention. The course will analyze and compare the most important ones of those decisions. It will offer a unique insight in treaty design, statutory enactments, varying court approaches, and the practice of international arbitration. The course materials will be made available at www.newyorkconvention.org.

Recommended: Any course in international arbitration.

Note: This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 3036 v00 International Arbitration Colloquium

LL.M Seminar | 4 credits in total credit hours

This is a year-long class restricted to students in the International Arbitration Scholars program. The course counts as one credit in the Fall, and three credits in the Spring (students will be enrolled for both semesters and will receive one grade for the class at the end of the Spring semester. Withdrawals are permitted up to the last day of class of the Fall semester, but withdrawal from the colloquium will also result in withdrawal from the Scholars program.) During the Fall semester, Scholars and faculty will meet for informal meetings to get to know each other and to be introduced to the arbitration community in Washington. Scholars will also meet individually during the Fall semester with Professor Whitesell and/or their faculty advisor to propose their research idea, present an outline and get feedback on the outline.

During the Spring semester, the Colloquium will meet on a weekly basis as a class. Spring classes will be a combination of student presentations, and specific topics presented by invited experts. Over the course of the Spring semester, class members will present their research to the group, with each class member presenting twice during the semester (once during the beginning of the semester to present their projects in the early stages, and once during the later part of the semester to present their near-final papers). The Scholars will also meet during the Spring on an individual basis with their advisors as they work to finalize their paper into publishable quality.

Note: Enrollment is limited to International Arbitration Scholars

LAW 3035 v00 International Arbitration from the Arbitrator’s Point of View

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

The course deals with “International Arbitration from the Arbitrator’s Point of View”. It describes the arbitrator’s role at each stage of the proceeding, the various relationships that exist and the legal, procedural, practical and even psychological issues that may arise.

The course starts from the proposal and selection of the arbitrator and ends with the notification of the award. Topic covered include: who may be an arbitrator; the first contact and the conflict check; the launching of the proceedings; relations with counsel and the parties’ representatives; the relationship among arbitrators; relations with experts; the conduct of the proceedings and, in particular, the hearings; deliberations and the decision; drafting of the award; the relationship with the institution; and the relation with the media.

The course will include both interactive lectures and some practical exercises.

Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an arbitration course.

Note: A student will be permitted to drop a course that meets for the first time after the add/drop period, without a transcript notation, if a student submits a written request to the Office of the Registrar prior to the start of the second class meeting. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

Note: This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students

LAW 3019 v00 International Arbitration in Asia

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

This course will examine how international disputes are resolved through arbitration in Asia. With the expansion of trade and investment, integration of global markets and the increasing complexity of transactions, international disputes inevitably arise. International arbitration has become the preferred means in Asia by which to resolve cross-border disputes, providing a critical pillar to the stability of international business and financial architecture. The emergence of Singapore, Hong Kong, Seoul and Beijing, among others, as hubs for arbitration offers alternatives to traditional centers such as London, Paris, Geneva or New York. With innovative arbitral institutions such as the Singapore International Arbitration Centre, Hong Kong International Arbitration Centre, China International Trade and Economic Arbitration Commission and Korean Commercial Arbitration Board, a wealth of case law and a mixture of common and civil law jurisdictions, an understanding of the commercial and investment arbitration practice in Asia should help practitioners and students interested in arbitration and Asia.

Main Textbook: The Developing World of Arbitration: A Comparative Study of Arbitration Reform in the Asia Pacific (Hart)

Additional Material to be provided.

Prerequisite: International Arbitration or International Commercial Arbitration or Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration

Note: This course will be held online via Zoom for Spring 2022 only.  Students and faculty will access the Zoom link through the course Canvas page.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 863 v00 International Business Litigation and Federal Practice

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The course explores issues common to litigation in U.S. courts arising from cross-border business transactions, including venue, jurisdiction, service of process, choice of law questions, discovery, evidence from abroad, privilege and ethical considerations, and the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments in U.S. courts. The course covers the resolution of disputes in litigation, as well as in arbitral proceedings, and through regulatory and other internal investigations, and explores issues such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Civil Litigation (LAWG/J 734); the J.D. course, International Civil Litigation (LAWG/J 013); and Cross Border International Litigation and Conflicts of Law (formerly International Conflict of Laws) (LAWG/J 735).

LAW 240 v01 International Business Negotiations

J.D. Seminar | 3 credit hours

This course is structured around a semester-long, simulated negotiation exercise in which the students in this class will represent a US pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation) and the students in a similar class, at the University of Dundee in Scotland, will represent an African agricultural production company (Malundian Cassava Corporation). The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that uses the cassava produced by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through live negotiation via videoconference. Substantive law issues related to the transaction, as well as negotiations strategy and related issues, will be addressed in this class.

The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to gain an introduction to transactional law and experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the business and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice with an unfamiliar opposing party (here, the students at Dundee).

The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges as well as preparing for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. Grades will be based on participation in the exercises, students’ diaries, and a final paper.

Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporations.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may receive credit for this course and the graduate course International Negotiations Seminar (LAWJ/G-958). Students may NOT receive credit for this course and the J.D. course International Negotiations Seminar (LAWJ/G-240).

Note: Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

Due to the coordination with the class in Dundee, Scotland, this class does not cancel even if Georgetown Law is closed. In the event of a weather closing, this class will be held via conference call dial-in.

LAW 240 v02 International Business Negotiations

J.D. Seminar | 3 credit hours

This simulation course is structured around a semester-long negotiation exercise in which the students on one team of lawyers will be negotiating with students on another team of lawyers. One team will represent an African agricultural production company (Malundian Cassava Corporation) and the other team will represent a multi-national pharmaceutical company (KJH Pharmaceutical Corporation). In the simulation, the two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by KJH Pharmaceutical that requires use of a plant crop (cassava) produced in Malundi and sold by Malundian Cassava Corporation. The form of their business collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement, or a long-term supply agreement. The negotiations will take place through written exchanges and through online negotiation sessions. Substantive legal topics related to the transactions, as well as to the process of international negotiation and related issues, will be covered  in this course.

The goals of this course are (i) to introduce students to transactional law and practice, (ii) to provide negotiations training and experience in the context of international transactional practice, and (iii) to develop legal-practice skills. Students will apply their legal and non-legal knowledge in the role of lawyers negotiating an international business transaction, within the controlled environment of the classroom.

This experiential course is built around active involvement in the transactional negotiations process. Students may expect to spend some time outside of the class meetings working in teams to prepare the written exchanges and prepare for the negotiations. Class meetings will focus on the strategy for and the process of the negotiations as well as on many of the substantive legal, business and policy issues that arise in the course of business negotiations. Grades will be based on 1) written self-evaluation “journal” entries and 2) a final paper (see “Course Requirements” below).

Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Corporations and Contracts.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may receive credit for this course and the graduate course International Negotiations Seminar (LAWJ/G-958). Students may NOT receive credit for this course and the J.D. course International Negotiations Seminar (LAWJ/G-240) or the graduate course International Negotiations (LAWJ/G-3029).

Note: In addition to the 2-hour Monday classes, this class has five Saturday sessions (see times below). These sessions are devoted to the live negotiations. Due to the Saturday sessions, the Monday sessions will end earlier in the semester.

NOTE: In the event of a weather closing, this class may be held via conference call dial-in.

LAW 876 v04 International Business Transactions

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This three credit course is an introductory survey of legal issues that arise in connection with international business transactions.  Subjects covered include:  (1) laws and treaties involved in cross-border business transactions; (2) core international business transactions, including international sales and letters of credit, non-establishment (agency, distribution, contract manufacturing, franchising, licensing) and establishment (branch, subsidiary, joint venture) forms of doing business, equity and debt/project finance transactions, and mergers and acquisitions; (3) fundamental legal concepts such as choice of law, choice of forum, jurisdiction, investment protection (expropriation), anti-corruption and competition regulation, and dispute resolution, focusing on litigation and arbitration, (4) the transfer and protection of intellectual property, and (5) corporate social responsibility.

The learning outcomes for this International Business Transactions course include: (1) basic knowledge and understanding of (a) substantive and procedural laws concerning international business transactions, and (b) the role of private and public international law in the conduct of international business; and (2) international legal analysis and reasoning, problem solving, professional skills, and written and oral communication in the context of international business transactions.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law; a course in Finance or Securities Regulation.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Business Transactions and International Dispute Resolution or the J.D. courses, International Business Transactions or International Economic Law.

LAW 876 v10 International Business Transactions

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

An introductory survey course examining transactional and litigation issues faced by international businesses. The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the broad scope of issues affecting international business prior to the students choosing other courses for further specialization and to introduce students to analytical tools used by lawyers who advise on matters related to international business. Emphasis is given to the actual practice of international business law.  Topics will include the international sale of goods (including letters of credit), international contract issues, cross-border financings (including letters of credit and bank financings), and international investments including project finance. Litigation topics will be related to the transactional issues covered and will include a special emphasis on contract rights and remedies, choice of law, choice of forum, and international arbitration.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I).

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Business Transactions and Dispute Resolution or the J.D. courses, International Business Transactions or International Economic Law.

Note: For the Spring 2022 semester, mandatory first class attendance rules will not be enforced for this course. Enrolled students will not be dropped if not in attendance at the start of the first class, and waitlisted students will remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist if not in attendance at the start of the first class.

LAW 882 v03 International Commercial Arbitration

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course presents an introduction to international commercial arbitration. It examines the nature of arbitration, the procedures used in international arbitration (both institutional and ad hoc) and the enforcement and setting aside of arbitral awards. The course will also cover drafting arbitration agreements, the law applicable to arbitrations (including the New York Convention, the ICSID Convention and various institutional rules), challenges to arbitration, multi-party arbitrations, jurisdiction, preliminary or interim measures and selection of the arbitral tribunal. The course also provides an introduction to arbitration between investors and states. Grades will be based primarily upon short papers addressing current issues in international arbitration.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the LL.M. seminars International Commercial Arbitration, Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration, or International Arbitration; or the CTLS seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar.

LAW 882 v05 International Commercial Arbitration

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

International commercial arbitration is often the preferred means by which sophisticated international businesses resolve their disputes. This course offers a study of arbitration as a dispute resolution process for international trade and business disputes. Students will learn about ad hoc and institutional arbitration, the authority of arbitral panels, enforcement of agreement to arbitrate, challenging arbitrators, procedure and choice of law in arbitral proceedings, and enforcement of international arbitral awards. The course focuses on commercial arbitration as an international practice and not on arbitration under any particular national system.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I); International Business Transactions.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. seminar, INTERNATIONAL COMMERCIAL ARBITRATION SEMINAR (CTLS COURSE).

LAW 882 v06 International Commercial Arbitration

LL.M Course | 1 credit hour

In today's global economy, parties to cross-border commercial transactions increasingly choose to resolve their disputes through international arbitration. This course provides students with an understanding of the law and practice of international arbitration from the perspective of United States law. Among other things, the course will consider the alternatives to international arbitration; the international conventions and U.S. arbitration statute; the arbitration agreement; the role of courts and tribunals in determining issues of arbitrability; international arbitration rules; provisional measures; judicial enforcement of arbitration agreements and arbitration awards; and judicial setting aside of arbitration awards.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Arbitration, Introduction to Commercial Arbitration or the J.D. seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar (CTLS course).

Note: WEEK ONE COURSE. This course will meet for one week only on the following days: Monday, January 10, 2022 through Thursday, January 13, 2022, 9:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. The course will have a take-home exam that must be completed during between January 21 and January 28, 2022.

This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

NOTE: For the Spring 2022 semester, mandatory attendance rules will not be enforced for this course; students will not automatically be dropped or withdrawn upon missing a class session. Students who miss class due to COVID-19 symptoms, quarantine, isolation, or other disruptions should contact the professor(s). Regular attendance and participation in all class sessions is expected, and students may be withdrawn, at the request of the faculty, if absent without good cause.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 2053 v00 International Commercial Arbitration in Cross-Cultural Context

LL.M Seminar | 1 credit hour

This class looks at international commercial arbitration in cross-cultural context and considers the various ways in which arbitral procedure borrows from the common and civil law traditions. Students will study various practices that are typical in arbitration and that can give rise to particular difficulties when the parties, counsel and/or arbitrators come from different legal traditions.

Among other things, students will engage in hands-on exercises involving interviewing, cross-examination, drafting of witness statements and the like. The goal is to provide students with a deeper understanding of how international commercial arbitration differs from other types of national and international dispute resolution and to provide students with the tools needed to excel in this growing area of law and practice.

After taking this course, students will have an increased ability to:
• appreciate the special nature of international arbitration as compared to other national and international dispute resolution processes;
• draft and revise international arbitration agreements;
• select an appropriate arbitrator in international matters;
• challenge arbitrators in international disputes;
• conduct cross-examination in international arbitral settings; and
• draft and review document requests in international arbitration. 

Note: WEEK ONE COURSE. This course will meet for one week only on the following days: Monday, January 10, 2022 through Thursday, January 13, 2022, 1:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m. 

This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students.

This course will be held online via Zoom for Spring 2022 only.  Students and faculty will access the Zoom link through the course Canvas page.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 3033 v00 International Commercial Arbitration with a Foreign Sovereign

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Resolution of disputes between private sector companies and sovereigns arising under international contracts and projects typically are resolved by international commercial arbitration, giving rise to unique challenges, issues, and opportunities.

This class will address the relationship between international arbitration and court litigation, key fora and features that exist in this realm, proper negotiation and mediation techniques, analysis of foreign sovereign immunities, choice law issues, the importance of language and culture in these disputes, interplay with treaty arbitration, issues arising under arbitration clauses, critical trends in case law and arbitral institutions, and enforcement of arbitration awards globally. The course will feature guest speakers, hands-on exercises, use of materials from actual arbitrations, optional field trips to local courts, and a two-class practical moot--all focused on the dynamics and practicalities of dealing with the disputes of sovereigns and private parties.

Recommended: Prior enrollment in a basic course in international arbitration

LAW 416 v02 International Courts and Tribunals: Theory and Practice

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course surveys existing international courts and tribunals. Over the semester, we will examine courts and tribunals with general jurisdiction (e.g., the International Court of Justice); courts and tribunals with specialized jurisdiction (e.g., the International Criminal Court, WTO, human rights tribunals, and investor-State tribunals); and claims tribunals and commissions (e.g., the Iran-United States Claims Tribunal and the United Nations Compensation Commission). The course seeks to provide a comparative understanding of the international adjudication system through readings and in-class exercises. General knowledge of public international law is required.

Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in International Law I.

LAW 3032 v00 International Energy Arbitration

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

The course begins with an introduction to International Energy Arbitration, followed by discussion of the International Energy Industry, its sources, segments, and players, including its evolution during the energy transition. An extensive presentation on the Legal Framework for International Energy Arbitration covers international laws and norms, national constitutions, national petroleum laws and regulations, and, in particular detail, the historical evolution of upstream host government petroleum contracts, including petroleum fiscal systems. To place the subject of host government contracts in its proper setting, the next section describes resource cycles and resource nationalism, as well as the legal status of host government contracts. Segments on contract stabilization and choice of law come next. The subject of international oil and gas dispute resolution explains the process and procedure for resolving these disputes through international arbitration, drawing on examples from actual international energy agreements and disputes. Discussion then moves to the early international oil and gas arbitration awards, from there to several modern international oil and gas arbitration awards, and finally to contemporary energy disputes with host governments. The course then moves to commercial disputes arising out of joint operating agreements, gas contracts, and LNG sales contracts. Following a discussion of enforcement of energy awards, the final segments address advocacy in international energy arbitration and building an international energy arbitration practice. The course is designed to provide an in-depth knowledge of the main types and key drivers of international energy disputes, past and present, not only to aid in understanding the international energy industry, its business relationships and contracts, its broader legal framework, and its disputes, but to build better advocates to represent international energy companies and host governments in these contentious proceedings.

Recommended: Prior or concurrent enrollment in an introductory international arbitration course.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

While the first three days of this course meet during the Fall add/drop period, a student may only drop this course without a transcript notation prior to the start of the second class session by submitting a written request to the Office of the Registrar. After the start of the second class session, a student must seek permission from an advisor to withdraw.
NOTE: For the Fall 2021 semester, mandatory attendance rules will not be enforced for this course; students will not automatically be dropped or withdrawn upon missing a class session. Students who miss class due to COVID-19 symptoms, quarantine, isolation, or other disruptions should contact the professor(s). Regular attendance and participation in all class sessions is expected, and students may be withdrawn, at the request of the faculty, if absent without good cause.
Note: This course is mandatory pass/fail and will not count toward the 7 credit pass/fail limit for J.D. students

LAW 3013 v00 International Investment Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

International investment law consists of those international legal principles that define the obligations of states toward the investments of aliens within their territory. Like all international law, it has developed in response to the concerns of States. The goal of this seminar is to develop in the student a rather full understanding and appreciation of the important principles of international investment law that now prevail and of the issues that are currently the subjects of serious debate. The seminar aims to develop this understanding by studying the historical development of this area of the law and considering the fundamental concerns of States that have driven this development.


We will begin by considering, as a normative matter, what a state’s responsibility toward private property should be and then review the legal principles espoused by the United States and other Western countries at the beginning of the last century, when there were few independent countries interested in challenging these views. We then will consider the development of dissent from this Western consensus in Latin America and in the newly independent states of Asia and Africa that emerged following the Second World War. Our consideration of this period of discord will be followed by discussion of the so-called "Washington consensus" that developed in the 80s and 90s, some parts of which are reflected in the thousands of bilateral investment treaties that have been concluded, largely in the last 30 years. We then will focus on those investment treaties, and the many arbitral awards that have interpreted them, to identify (1) key principles of investment law on which a broad consensus has emerged and (2) difficulties that arise in applying those principles to particular situations. Finally, the seminar will consider the relationship between international investment law and efforts by states -- jointly or separately -- to promote environmental protection, labor rights, and investments that serve the long-term interests of the population of the host state. We will discuss whether these goals can be pursued effectively under the principles on which a consensus now exists, whether these principles need to change, or whether some additional principles need to evolve. We will end by discussing some of the policy issues now being debated that relate to the desirability of investor-state dispute-settlement procedures and to the contents of international investment agreements, including two now being negotiated, the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)

Recommended: An introductory international law course.

Note: A student will be permitted to drop a course that meets for the first time after the add/drop period, without a transcript notation, if a student submits a written request to the Office of the Registrar prior to the start of the second class meeting. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 3046 v00 International Investment Law and Arbitration in Practice: Past, Present, and Future

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Foreign investments today enjoy international legal protection through a global network of more than 3,000 investment treaties. Many of these treaties offer recourse to international arbitration to investors whose investments have been subject to interference in the state hosting the investment. Public interest in investment treaty arbitration is growing and both developed and developing countries have begun to revisit their treaties. Investment treaty arbitrations often focus on the interface between domestic and international law, and turn on how to balance the rights of private investors against the wider public interest.
 
Over the last two decades, international investment law has become one of the most dynamic areas of international law. Public attention has focused on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, NAFTA, and the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. In the wake of a rapid increase in the number of investment disputes, including those arising out of Argentina’s 2001 financial crisis, Germany’s exit from nuclear power, the expropriation of Yukos shareholders and Australia’s plain tobacco packaging legislation, awareness of investment treaties and their robust investor-state dispute resolution mechanism, has grown. The legitimacy and fairness of decision-making by investment tribunals have come under scrutiny.
 
This seminar addresses the substantive and procedural legal issues arising in investment law and arbitration today, principally – but not exclusively – from the perspective of practice. We will consider the ambit and substance of the protections afforded to foreign investors through treaties, including investment chapters of free trade agreements, while focussing on the specific legal and practical issues that can arise for claimant investors, respondent states, arbitrators and third parties during the course of a case. We will learn about the institutions and rules that govern investor state arbitration, we will consider the theoretical and policy background that underpins the governing framework, and we will scrutinize the relationship between investment treaty law and other areas of international law, public law, and human rights law

Note: Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 2061 v00 International Litigation and International Arbitration: A Practitioner's Approach

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This survey course introduces students to the mechanisms used to resolve cross-border commercial disputes—international litigation and international arbitration—from the perspective of a practitioner. Among the topics examined are (1) the legal and practical advantages and disadvantages of litigation and arbitration, (2) the international legal framework for international arbitration and litigation (including key treaties), (3) key elements of international arbitration agreements (including the negotiation of those agreements), (4) key principles regarding the enforcement of international arbitral awards, (5) basic conflicts of laws principles in international arbitration and litigation, (6) principles and tactics involved in litigating and arbitrating against foreign sovereigns and their instrumentalities, (7) the jurisdiction of US courts over foreign defendants in cross-border cases, (8) the enforcement of US judgments in other national courts, (9) the practice and strategic use of parallel international litigation and arbitration proceedings, and (10) unique features of civil and common law in the resolution of international commercial disputes.

LAW 3029 v00 International Negotiations

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The International Negotiation course will focus on the methods and objectives for successfully engaging in international negotiations. This course will include in-depth reviews and class discussions of negotiations conducted by governments, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, as well as international institutions. The course will provide important insight into the necessary preparations and research necessary to conduct international negotiations as well as a better understanding of the complexities and nuance of actual negotiations. The course will provide students an opportunity to review and dissect previous negotiations and prepare and conduct negotiations based on their understanding of what works and what does not. Discussions will focus on the most important aspects of negotiations -- mutual understanding of the expected outcome, in-depth review of the expected positions of the parties, how to accurately understand the extent of any leverage and how to assess a successful outcome. Cultural, linguistic and other possible impediments to a successful negotiation will also be explored to provide students a full understanding of all that goes in to a successful negotiation.

Recommended: Prior enrollment in International Law, Conflicts

Strongly Recommended: Legal writing

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and the International Negotiations Seminar or International Business Negotiations.

LAW 240 v00 International Negotiations Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This seminar seeks to develop skills and knowledge to participate in negotiations and in particular international business negotiations. Approximately a third of course time is devoted to the negotiating process and analysis of negotiation principles and dynamics. Another third is spent on the cultural, practical, legal and strategic elements of international business transactions. The balance is spent on a series of "mock" negotiations. Students, individually and in groups, experiment with different negotiating techniques and fact situations of increasing complexity. The course requirement is principally satisfied through preparation of a comprehensive negotiated agreement and follow-up memorandum. Heavy emphasis is placed on class participation, including the negotiations. The final negotiating problem requires substantial team work with others, including strategy, analysis, and preparation. Negotiations are carried on both inside and outside normal class time.

Recommended: Contracts.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for this course and the International Negotiations Seminar (LAWJ/G-958) or International Negotiations (LAWJ/G-3029) in the graduate program, or International Business Negotiations.

Note: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist.

For the Spring 2022 semester, mandatory first class attendance rules will not be enforced for this course. Enrolled students will not be dropped if not in attendance at the start of the first class, and waitlisted students will remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist if not in attendance at the start of the first class.

Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 958 v00 International Negotiations Seminar

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

After introductory lectures on negotiation theory and practice, the seminar students will be divided into teams for a series of simulated negotiations covering government-to-government, government-private and transnational private negotiations.  Student performance in these negotiations and class discussions will comprise most of the course grade; no research paper or examination is required.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may receive credit for this course and International Business Negotiations. Students may NOT receive credit for both this course and International Negotiations or the J.D. course, International Negotiations Seminar.

Note: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist.

NOTE: For the Fall 2021 semester, mandatory first class attendance rules will not be enforced for this course. Enrolled students will not be dropped if not in attendance at the start of the first class, and waitlisted students will remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist if not in attendance at the start of the first class. 

LAW 820 v01 International Protection of Intellectual Property Through the WTO

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course deals with international protection of intellectual property through the World Trade Organization (WTO) and the WTO agreements which cover intellectual property: the TRIPS Agreement, The Paris Convention and the Berne Convention. The course will also cover the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the Dispute Settlement Understanding, which are essential in enforcing these agreements.

The course examines in detail the relevant U.S. law and how the extraterritorial application of these laws effects international enforcement of intellectual property. These laws are Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 which prohibits the importation of articles into the United States which infringe U.S. patents, trademarks, or copyrights, and Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 which allows retaliation against foreign countries which impose unjustifiable or unreasonable restrictions against U.S. commerce.

The main WTO cases in intellectual property will be read and analyzed. These will include the cases on Sections 337 and 301, which have limited the United States’ ability to unilaterally affect intellectual property law. Other cases will include the U.S. – Cuba Havana Club case, the Indian Pharmaceutical case, the Internet Gaming case, the U.S. Musical Copyright case, the European Geographical Indication (GI) case, the Canada Pharmaceutical patent case, and the China Intellectual Property Violation case. The course will study the Doha Agreement, which allows the compulsory licensing of pharmaceutical patents to fight pandemic diseases particularly HIV/AIDS. Finally, the course will review any significant changes in trade law or existing trade agreements, particularly as relates to intellectual property, that may occur under the Trump administration

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Intellectual Property in World Trade (LAWG/J-226).

LAW 673 v01 International Trade and Investment Litigation and Strategy

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This course will teach students the practical aspects involved in litigation of international trade and investment disputes. Its goal is to prepare students entering either private practice or government service to handle complex litigation in those fields. The course will provide a comparative analysis of the dispute settlement mechanism of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and Investor-State arbitration. While it will focus on procedural issues and case management, the first sessions will provide an overview of the legal framework of the multilateral trading system and investment treaty law. It will identify and analyze each phase of the proceedings of WTO disputes (under the Dispute Settlement Understanding) and of investor-State arbitrations (mainly under the arbitration rules of the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes and Chapter Eleven of the North American Free Trade Agreement). Some of the topics that will be covered include: pre-trial preparation, formal initiation of a dispute, constitution of panels and tribunals, discretionary procedural issues, evidentiary issues, jurisdictional and other preliminary objections, written pleadings, conduct of hearings, use of witnesses and experts, awards and rulings, recourses, implementation and enforcement, and in general case management. The analysis and discussions in class will be based on treaty text, jurisprudence and the practical, hands-on experience of the professors. Guest-speakers – including practitioners, government officials, or staff from relevant international organizations – will be invited to a few sessions. Students will be expected to participate in class discussions and in simulations.

Recommended: Basic courses in public international law and international trade.

LAW 244 v05 International Trade Law

J.D. Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

Economic interdependence between countries and across production chains has grown exponentially. Yet, today, economic globalization is under attack. In this context, existing rules on international trade, and negotiating fora to potentially change those rules, are key. This course focuses on the rules and institutions established under the World Trade Organization (WTO) as well as selected regional trade agreements. What are the benefits and risks of trade liberalization from legal, economic and political perspectives? How can trade liberalization go hand in hand with pursuing public policy goals such as protecting the environment or labour standards ("non-trade concerns"), job creation or promoting the economic development of poor countries? The course will offer an in-depth, practical knowledge of substantive WTO law drawing heavily on case law from dispute settlement practice. It will address the basic principles of trade in goods and trade in services as well as more specific WTO agreements on, for example, health measures, subsidies, trade remedies and intellectual property rights. The course will also focus on the unique WTO mechanism for the settlement of trade disputes, and especially on how it balances trade liberalization with non-trade concerns as well as how it copes with increasing trade tensions between OECD countries and emerging economies like Brazil, China, India and Russia.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Trade and the WTO or World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement; or the graduate course, International Trade Law and Regulation.

Note: There are no prerequisites for this course. 

This course will meet 2 times per week in the weeks of August 30 - September 17 and October 11- October 29. In addition, there will be three classes taught remotely on October 7, November 11 and November 16. 

LAW 966 v01 International Trade Law & Regulation

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2-3 credit hours

Examines international trade laws and regulations and World Trade Organization agreements affecting international trade, and the relationship of the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1994 and other international agreements to U.S. law and practice. Considers, in detail, the U.S. antidumping, countervailing duty, safeguards (Section 201) laws and regulations and the WTO agreements that establish multinational standards applicable to the use of those remedies. Examines the WTO agreements on services, intellectual property, and technical barriers to trade. Examines the statutory remedies, particularly Section 301, that are available to address foreign restrictions on U.S. exports of goods, capital, services, and intellectual property. Analyzes the U.S.-China "trade war" and resulting tariffs and agreements.  Evaluates the role of Congress, the U.S. Trade Representative, and other U.S. agencies in setting trade policy and overseeing administration of the trade laws. Analyzes the WTO procedures for dispute resolution and key WTO panel and Appellate Body decisions. Reviews free trade agreements, including the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, as well as bilateral investment treaties. The course includes a weekly discussion of current events affecting international trade law and regulation.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. course, International Trade or World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement.

Note: The 3-credit section of this course meets the "Category 1" requirement for the WTO certificate program.
The two-credit class requires a final exam; the three-credit class requires a paper. J.D. students must register for the three-credit section of the seminar if they wish to write a paper fulfilling the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement for JD students. The paper requirements of the two-credit section will not fulfill the Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement for JD students.

LAW 898 v01 International Trade Remedies and the WTO

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

This class is an intensive workshop designed to use case studies of U.S. agency decisions and related WTO jurisprudence to: 1) develop students’ substantive understanding of trade remedy law; and 2) introduce students to the policy and procedural aspects of the various phases of trade remedy disputes in the U.S. and at the international level. The class will include an examination of U.S. law and WTO agreements on antidumping measures, subsidies and countervailing measures, and safeguards. Particular attention will be focused on developing strong oral and written advocacy and presentation skills through issue spotting exercises/mock agency hearings and the final writing assignment.

Prerequisite: International Trade (3 credits), OR International Trade and the WTO, OR International Law II, OR International Economic Law, OR International Trade Law & Regulation OR World Trade Organization: Law, Policy and Dispute Settlement.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the course WTO: Dumping, Subsidies and Safeguards.

LAW 2047 v00 Introduction to International Commercial Arbitration

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This course will introduce the basic concepts of international commercial arbitration from both a theoretical and practical perspective. It will provide a general overview of the subject, and subsequently focus on issues including the agreement to arbitrate, the constitution and duties of the arbitral tribunal, the conduct of the proceedings and the arbitral award. The course will refer to the ICC Rules of Arbitration in discussing many of the practical aspects of these issues.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and International Commercial Arbitration or International Arbitration (LAWG-882 or LAWJ-882), or the J.D. seminar, International Commercial Arbitration Seminar (CTLS course).

Note: Please note, the date for the final class session will be announced at the start of the semester.

LAW 2055 v00 Investment Treaty Arbitration, Public International Law, and Landmark Judgments of the ICJ

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This seminar will lay out the basic principles of international investment treaty arbitration by analyzing and studying the underlying principles of public international law as well as landmark decisions of the Permanent Court of International Justice and the International Court of Justice (ICJ) that influence Investor-State arbitration. The curriculum and calendar of the seminar will follow the procedural structure of a proceeding at the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID) — i.e., first covering registration of a request for arbitration under articles 25 and 36 of the ICSID Convention, then discussing preliminary objections under Rule 41(5) of the ICSID Rules of Arbitration, provisional measures, objections to jurisdiction, merits, and ending with quantum.

The objective of the seminar is to provide students interested in investment treaty arbitration and/or public international law with a solid understanding of the principles and judgments of the ICJ and other relevant public international law instruments, including the International Law Commission’s 2001 Articles on State Responsibility, which together form the basis for the rules and principles that guide investment treaty arbitration.

Recommended: International Law I: Introduction to International Law (or the equivalent International Law I); Litigation Practice in International Arbitration; or Investor-State Dispute Settlement.

LAW 676 v02 Investor-State Dispute Resolution

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

The subject of investor-state disputes and their resolution lies at the cutting edge of international law, and is a major factor in the development of the global economic system in years to come. Study of this form of arbitration provides insight into the evolving shape of customary international law, the conflict between capital-importing and capital-exporting states, and the status of individuals in the international legal order. This seminar will provide students with a firm grounding in the history, present practice, and future implications of arbitration between foreign investors and host states, sanctioned by multilateral and bilateral investment treaties. Topics that will be covered in this course are the history of the treatment of aliens and investments under international law; an overview of the most important international treaties that give investors a right to arbitration of claims; the most important elements of procedure that characterize investor-state arbitration, including tribunal composition, jurisdiction, evidence, award and challenge or annulment; substantive law of investment arbitration, the standards that apply when a tribunal determines whether a breach of the treaty has occurred; and the future development of investor-state arbitration including the challenges of globalization and other stresses, the clash of capital-importing and capital-exporting countries, environmental protection and free trade, restrictions on state sovereignty, the construction of an international investment jurisprudence, the limits on arbitrability, and the expansion of multilateral investment protections worldwide. Active participation in discussion of the course materials is required.

Prerequisite: International Law I.

Recommended: International Commercial Arbitration

Note: Students may not withdraw from this class after the add/drop period ends without the permission of the professor.

LAW 676 v00 Investor-State Dispute Resolution Seminar

LL.M Seminar | 3 credit hours

The subject of investor-state disputes and their resolution lies at the cutting edge of international law, and is a major factor in the development of the global economic system in years to come. Study of this form of arbitration provides insight into the evolving shape of customary international law, the conflict between capital-importing and capital-exporting states, and the status of individuals in the international legal order. This seminar will provide students with a firm grounding in the history, present practice, and future implications of arbitration between foreign investors and host states, sanctioned by multilateral and bilateral investment treaties. Topics that will be covered in this course are the history of the treatment of aliens and investments under international law; an overview of the most important international treaties that give investors a right to arbitration of claims; the most important elements of procedure that characterize investor-state arbitration, including tribunal composition, jurisdiction, evidence, award and challenge or annulment; substantive law of investment arbitration, the standards that apply when a tribunal determines whether a breach of the treaty has occurred; and the future development of investor-state arbitration including the challenges of globalization and other stresses, the clash of capital-importing and capital-exporting countries, environmental protection and free trade, restrictions on state sovereignty, the construction of an international investment jurisprudence, the limits on arbitrability, and the expansion of multilateral investment protections worldwide. Active participation in discussion of the course materials is required.

Prerequisite: International Law I

Recommended: International Commercial Arbitration

Note: For the Spring section: FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist.

For the Spring 2022 semester, mandatory first class attendance rules will not be enforced for this course. Enrolled students will not be dropped if not in attendance at the start of the first class, and waitlisted students will remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist if not in attendance at the start of the first class.

Student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal BY PROFESSOR PERMISSION ONLY.

This course requires a paper. J.D. Students: this will fulfill the J.D. Upperclass Legal Writing Requirement.

LAW 1179 v01 Modern Litigation Theory and Practice Seminar

J.D. Seminar | 3 credit hours

This seminar focuses on modern issues related to litigation and dispute resolution as well as the role of private enforcement in our overall system of divided government. In particular, the seminar will dedicate discussion to the doctrinal and litigation history that produced our present litigation landscape, questions of policy and theory that cut across class actions and other litigation alternatives, and questions regarding the role of private enforcement, the judiciary, and the rule of law in our system of government.

The seminar will integrate guest speakers that include some of the leading practitioners, judges, and scholars in the country.

This seminar is intended for students who wish to pursue advanced, in-depth study of our system of litigation and private enforcement. Civil Procedure (or Legal Process and Society), torts, and contracts are pre-requisites.

Students will write short response papers on the readings, which—depending upon the particular reading—will be assigned either weekly or bi-weekly.

Prerequisite: Civil Procedure (or Legal Process and Society), Contracts and Torts.

LAW 1482 v01 Negotiations and Mediation Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

All lawyers, irrespective of their specialty, must negotiate. This intensive, interactive seminar will explore the theoretical and practical aspects of negotiating and mediating transactions and disputes in our legal system. The goal is to improve students’ understanding of negotiation and mediation as well as their ability to negotiate effectively.

Students will learn to negotiate by studying the negotiation theory, concepts and principles, and by participating in simulations and exercises from a variety of practice areas. The simulations are designed to familiarize students with the negotiating and mediation processes, sensitize them to their own negotiating behaviors, teach them how to use a mediator in aid of their negotiations, and raise a number of ethical and practical questions. Through in-class negotiation and mediation exercises, students will develop and sharpen skills in the areas of listening, asking questions, creative thinking, and persuasive communication.

Through in-class negotiation exercises, students will develop and sharpen skills in the areas of listening, asking questions, creative thinking, and persuasive communication. Class lectures and discussions will focus on such topics as the difference between competitive and integrative bargaining, the psychological and ethical dimensions of negotiations, and the importance of context in choosing negotiation strategies. Students will be videotaped while conducting at least one of their negotiations, followed by instructor evaluation and feedback.

Grades are based on the quality of student participation, several short “think pieces” and journal entries based on in-class experience, readings and lectures, and a final 10-15 page paper.

The Workshop is intensive (9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. for six sessions spread over two weekends). Full attendance and participation is required at all six sessions.

Learning Objectives:

  • Familiarization with negotiation and mediation theory, concepts and principles.
  • Deepening of behaviors, processes and mindsets required for effective negotiation and mediation.
  • Sharpening skills in the areas of listening, asking questions, creative thinking, and persuasive communication.
  • Engaging in reflective practice.
  • Awareness of the role that assumptions, differences (e.g., culture, gender) and psychology play in shaping negotiation/conflict dynamics.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this seminar and the Negotiations Seminar, Negotiations Seminar (LLM), Negotiations Seminar (LLM - Week One), Mediation Seminar, or Mediation Advocacy Seminar.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

NOTE: Mandatory attendance rules will be enforced for this class for the Spring 2022 semester. Graduating students are encouraged to ensure they have enough credits should they be prevented from attending due to COVID-19 symptoms, isolation, quarantine, or other disruptions.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

There is a course materials fee for this course, which covers outside vendor materials purchased on behalf of all enrolled students (these materials are distributed as part of the course’s in-class assignments and exercises). This fee is posted to your student account in August (for Fall courses) or December (for Spring courses), or as soon as you are enrolled in the course, whichever is later. Students who drop the course will be refunded the amount. Students approved to withdraw will not be refunded.

LAW 317 v14 Negotiations Seminar

J.D. Seminar (cross-listed) | 3 credit hours

This intensive, interactive seminar is designed to teach both the theory and practice of negotiation. The goal is to improve students’ understanding of negotiation as well as their ability to negotiate effectively. Students will spend much of their time participating in negotiation exercises and simulations from a variety of practice areas. Through the in-class negotiation exercises, debriefings, and lectures, students will develop and sharpen skills in the areas of listening, asking questions, creative thinking, and persuasive communication. Class lectures and discussions will focus on such topics as the difference between competitive and integrative bargaining, the psychological and ethical dimensions of negotiations, and the importance of planning and choosing negotiation strategies.

The seminar will meet for five sessions spread over two weekends. Attendance at all sessions is mandatory. Between weekend sessions, students will negotiate with a classmate and write a short reflection paper about the experience. In addition, a final paper (10-15 pages) is required, in which students should demonstrate that they have learned the concepts, principles, and theories from lectures, readings, and exercises.

Grades will be based on:

  • Participation in class (30%)
  • Midterm reflection paper (20%)
  • Final paper (10-15 pages) (50%).

Learning Objectives:

  • Gain knowledge about negotiation theory, including the differences between competitive bargaining and integrative bargaining.
  • Know how to prepare to conduct an effective negotiation.
  • Feel more comfortable negotiating and become more effective negotiators.
  • Develop and sharpen skills in the areas of listening, asking questions, creative thinking, and persuasive communication.
  • Engage in effective problem solving with respect to the simulated exercises, whether alone or in teams.
  • Identify and appreciate ethical considerations related to negotiations.
  • Engage in self-reflection and peer critique, including applying lessons learned in exercises to future performances and providing constructive criticism to classmates.

Recommended: Torts, Contracts, and Civil Procedure. Students with no formal negotiation training are encouraged to enroll.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the Negotiations and Mediation Seminar.

Note: NOTE: In the Fall 2021 semester, this course will take place online via Zoom

NOTE: In the Spring 2022 semester, this course will take place online via Zoom.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

There is a course materials fee for this course, which covers outside vendor materials purchased on behalf of all enrolled students (these materials are distributed as part of the course’s in-class assignments and exercises). This fee is posted to your student account in August (for Fall courses) or December (for Spring courses), or as soon as you are enrolled in the course, whichever is later. Students who drop the course will be refunded the amount. Students approved to withdraw will not be refunded.

LAW 2075 v01 Negotiations Seminar (LLM - Week One)

LL.M Seminar | 3 credit hours

This interactive seminar is designed to teach both the theory and practice of negotiation. The goal is to improve students’ understanding of negotiation as well as their ability to negotiate effectively. Students will spend much of their time participating in negotiation exercises and simulations from a variety of practice areas. Through the in-class negotiation exercises, debriefings, and lectures, students will develop and sharpen skills in the areas of listening, asking questions, creative thinking, and persuasive communication. Class lectures and discussions will focus on such topics as the difference between competitive and integrative bargaining, the ethical dimensions of negotiations, the importance of reputations, and the value in planning and choosing negotiation strategies.
The seminar will meet during Week One (Monday - Friday). Attendance at all sessions is mandatory. The class sessions are designed to provide an environment that is conducive for all students to experiment with different negotiation skills and behaviors. Students are not graded on the outcomes or results of negotiations, but on commitment to the materials and exercises. 

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the Negotiations and Mediation Seminar; the Negotiations Seminar; or Negotiation and Mediation in Public Interest Law Settings or Negotiations and Drafting Seminar or Contracts: Structure and Negotiations.

Note: NOTE: In the Spring 2022 semester, this course will take place online via Zoom.

WEEK ONE COURSE. This seminar will meet for one week only on the following days: Monday, January 10, 2022 through Friday, January 14, 2022, 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

There is a course materials fee for this course, which covers outside vendor materials purchased on behalf of all enrolled students (these materials are distributed as part of the course’s in-class assignments and exercises). This fee is posted to your student account in August (for Fall courses) or December (for Spring courses), or as soon as you are enrolled in the course, whichever is later. Students who drop the course will be refunded the amount. Students approved to withdraw will not be refunded.

This course is graded pass-fail and is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 2075 v00 Negotiations Seminar (LLM)

LL.M Seminar | 3 credit hours

This interactive seminar is designed to teach both the theory and practice of negotiation. The goal is to improve students’ understanding of negotiation as well as their ability to negotiate effectively. Students will spend much of their time participating in negotiation exercises and simulations from a variety of practice areas. Through the in-class negotiation exercises, debriefings, and lectures, students will develop and sharpen skills in the areas of listening, asking questions, creative thinking, and persuasive communication. Class lectures and discussions will focus on such topics as the difference between competitive and integrative bargaining, the ethical dimensions of negotiations, the importance of reputations, and the value in planning and choosing negotiation strategies.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the Negotiations and Mediation Seminar; the Negotiations Seminar; or Negotiation and Mediation in Public Interest Law Settings or Negotiations and Drafting Seminar or Contracts: Structure and Negotiations.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree) and is graded on a pass/fail basis.

LAW 741 v00 Pre-Negotiation Strategies for Cross-Border Transactions

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

As economies globalize and organizations increasingly form cross-border relationships, there should be more focus on problems facing legal practitioners caused by cross-cultural differences. While international transactions comprise of distinct phases, the aim of this course is to explore the importance of pre-negotiation phase of international transactions. The legal training in the United States tend to devote far too little time and attention to the pre-negotiation phase than most of our counterparts from other countries. American lawyers generally want to “dispense with the preliminaries” and “to get down to cases” at the negotiation table. For seasoned lawyers and executives, however, this phase of Pre-negotiation is the most important stage to determine whether they want to negotiate at all and, if so, what they will talk about, and how, when, and where they will do it. Without a proper pre-negotiation phase, one may not get to that negotiation table, let alone explore any dispute resolution mechanisms.

Pre-negotiation phase can be characterized by information-gathering efforts to evaluate the parties’ interests and comprises of a process entailing rational choice to pursue negotiation or not. This course, “Pre-negotiation Strategies,” will attempt to introduce an analytical framework for understanding and formulating culturally responsive legal strategies for international lawyers. This highly interactive class will utilize case studies as well as various international agreements to highlight the importance of evaluating and analyzing the negotiating environment before it actually takes place. The course will address the need for practitioners to research and identify certain cultural mores and behavioral patterns in dealing with an unfamiliar culture as well as examine foreign bureaucracies, foreign laws, and multiple currencies in order to develop cross-culturally sensitive strategies in international transactions.

Active in-class participation and simulations will be required.

Note: First class attendance is strongly encouraged.

LAW 3049 v00 Sovereign States and the Permanent Court of Arbitration

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 1 credit hour

While arbitration is most often thought of as an alternative to litigation in national courts, arbitration between sovereign states developed as an alternative to war. This course examines the use of arbitration to resolve the most complex and politically sensitive disputes between governments.

Drawing heavily on the experience of the Permanent Court of Arbitration, students will learn the reasons for the renaissance of this form of dispute settlement and how it differs from more conventional forms of arbitration and from international courts with pre-appointed judges. Students will evaluate arbitration's effectiveness in a series of recent high-profile cases. The course will include video clips of hearings and interactive exercises.

Note: ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety may result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

NOTE: For the Fall 2021 semester, mandatory attendance rules will not be enforced for this course; students will not automatically be dropped or withdrawn upon missing a class session. Students who miss class due to COVID-19 symptoms, quarantine, isolation, or other disruptions should contact the professor(s). Regular attendance and participation in all class sessions is expected, and students may be withdrawn, at the request of the faculty, if absent without good cause.

LAW 3136 v00 State-to-State Dispute Resolution

LL.M Seminar (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Modern interstate dispute resolution finds its basis in a string of ad hoc arbitrations and claims commissions from the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries.  The United States was an early adopter of arbitration as a means of resolving interstate disputes, first agreeing with the United Kingdom in 1794 in the Jay Treaty to resolve certain disputes remaining from the Revolutionary War.

In the first part of the 20th century, there was an effort to formalize such disputes, first through the PCA and then the PCIJ and ICJ.  In the latter half of the 20th century and into the 21st century, there was a rapid increase in formal mechanisms or courts to hear state to state disputes, including the WTO and ITLOS mechanisms, other specialized courts, and a host of regional courts and tribunals.  Ad hoc arbitration and claims commissions continue to be used to resolve disputes as well.

This course will tackle state-to-state disputes a historical and comparative perspective, tracking the development of interstate dispute resolution over time and across institutions.  We will approach the history of interstate dispute resolution from both a legal and political science perspective.  In so doing, the course will ask the following questions:

  • Why have states agreed to submit their disputes to arbitration or other dispute resolution mechanisms?  What were the international relations factors that permitted the use of such mechanisms?
  • How successful are such means in resolving disputes between states?  What sorts of disputes can be resolved through arbitration or similar mechanisms? 
  • How does interstate dispute resolution work in practice?
  • What are common procedures for such disputes?
  • How do international courts develop international law?
  • What are the prospects for interstate dispute resolution going forward?  

LAW 872 v00 World Trade Organization: Agreements, Negotiations & Disputes

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

The course analyzes the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its agreements, including the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), and the substance and status of negotiations to amend the agreements. It concentrates on the coverage of the agreements, based on their text and interpretive guidance from key dispute settlement decisions. The course also reviews the relevant economic, policy and legal aspects of the international trading system.

LAW 703 v00 WTO & Public International Law

LL.M Course (cross-listed) | 2 credit hours

Since the institution of the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Understanding in 1994, WTO

jurisprudence has increasingly addressed disputes involving the interaction between trade related values and other domestic or international policy values. The various WTO instruments that are subject to the discipline of the Dispute Settlement Understanding address the relationships between international trade and other fields such as public health, the environment, intellectual property, and even public morality. The treatment of these issues in the WTO Agreements simultaneously demonstrates the linkages among these fields, and the separation of each from the others. Moreover, many of these “trade-related but not trade” policy areas are covered by other international agreements and understandings, as well as by domestic laws, and are in some cases subject to different judicial or quasi-judicial dispute resolution mechanisms, each applying its own rules of decision. Finally, even within the international trade arena, the proliferation of regional trade arrangements with their own dispute settlement mechanisms presents another

potential source of conflict with the jurisprudence of the WTO.


This state of affairs has, since about 1995, given rise to serious concerns over what has been termed the “fragmentation” of international law. Although abstract, the question of whether international law should be viewed as a “system” of law, or merely as an aggregation of rules formed principally by agreements between sovereign states, has become one of more than theoretical interest. The resolution of actual or potential conflicts between various specialized international regimes, as well as between such regimes and domestic legal regimes, has become of increasing practical importance. In many respects, WTO jurisprudence stands at the heart of these developing concerns.


This course will examine the jurisprudence of the WTO through the lens of the issue of

fragmentation. Through a close study of relevant decisions and hypothetical disputes, the course will address actual and potential regime conflict issues between the international trade regime and competing norms in the environmental, public health, and intellectual property spheres. It will also address the challenges to the integrity of general international law, and of the WTO regime itself, that are posed by the proliferation of regional trade regimes with their own dispute settlement mechanisms, and by emerging questions about the effect of WTO norms within domestic legal regimes. The course will seek to balance a case-driven approach to these issues with a consideration of the underlying theoretical questions, and will regularly return to the question of the future role of the WTO in the new world order of international law.

Recommended: Prior exposure to WTO law, or concurrent enrollment in a basic course in WTO law.

Georgetown’s Director of the Program in International Arbitration and Dispute Resolution is Professor Anne Marie Whitesell. Professor Whitesell brings her experience as an international academic, a former Secretary General of the ICC International Court of Arbitration, and a practitioner into the classroom. Other faculty in the Program include full time and adjunct professors with experience at the highest levels in private practice, arbitral institutions, and government agencies in Washington, D.C. and throughout the world. Students take classes from arbitration practitioners, including partners working at top international law firms as counsel and arbitrator, lawyers from government agencies, and professors from leading international universities.

The Georgetown International Arbitration Society (“GIAS”) is one of the Law Center’s most active student organizations. Composed of both J.D. and LL.M. students, GIAS is dedicated to providing students the opportunity to learn more about international arbitration and to meet top practitioners in the field. GIAS hosts many events throughout the year, including conferences in cooperation with other institutions in related fields, and numerous networking events with practitioners and students. The Georgetown International Arbitration Alumni organization (“GIAA”) serves as a worldwide professional network and resource for Georgetown alumni interested in international arbitration and dispute resolution. By linking alumni to each other and the Law Center, GIAA plays a key role in supporting initiatives for Georgetown Law’s leading program in international arbitration and dispute resolution.