Two-Year LL.M. with Certificate in Legal English for Foreign-Trained Lawyers

LAW 2058 v00 Academic Legal English I

LL.M Seminar | 6 credit hours

Academic Legal English is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This year-long course is designed to help prepare students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study at a law school in the U.S. The course focuses on enhancing students’ language proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with particular emphasis on developing language skills for both understanding legal texts (e.g., judicial opinions, law review articles, and court documents) as well as producing legal texts (e.g., case briefs, "issue spotter" exam answers, and academic papers). Throughout the academic year, students will work closely with course instructors and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

LAW 2092 v00 Academic Legal English II

LL.M Seminar | 6 credit hours

Academic Legal English is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This year-long course is designed to help prepare students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study at a law school in the U.S. The course focuses on enhancing students’ language proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with particular emphasis on developing language skills for both understanding legal texts (e.g., judicial opinions, law review articles, and court documents) as well as producing legal texts (e.g., case briefs, "issue spotter" exam answers, and academic papers). Throughout the academic year, students will work closely with course instructors and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

LAW 3113 v00 Appellate Advocacy

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

Appellate Advocacy is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. The focus of this course is to teach students the analytical and rhetorical skills to advocate on behalf of clients. Building on the research and writing skills acquired in U.S. Legal Research, Analysis, and Writing in the Fall semester, students research and write an appellate brief about a simulated case. As part of this legal writing project, students also meet with law librarians to learn more about legal research and citation. Students submit a first draft of the appellate brief and meet with faculty individually to discuss revision and editing strategies for the final draft. At the end of the semester, students argue the case before a panel of judges.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

LAW 3061 v00 Discussion Skills for International Lawyers

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

Discussion Skills for International Lawyers is required for students in the Two-year LL.M. Program. This semester-long course will focus on speaking and listening skills necessary to succeed in law classes in the United States, and students will complete a variety of assignments that will help develop their oral communication skills to participate in class. At the beginning of the semester, students will be evaluated on their oral communication skills and will be provided with an individualized pronunciation plan that address problematic sounds and intelligibility issues unique to each person. Thereafter, class time will be spent working on the articulation of individual sounds, word and sentential stress, and intonation. Students will also practice listening strategies to aid in the comprehension of a variety of American English accents they will likely encounter in the U.S. Finally, students will read texts related to current legal topics and practice the essential skills of being a good discussion facilitator and participant in a seminar class setting. 

Note: This class is restricted to students enrolled in the Extended LL.M. with Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. 

LAW 160 v06 Drafting Contracts

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

This course introduces foreign-educated LL.M. students to the principles, processes and techniques for drafting contracts in the United States, but with a cross-border, multi-country setting. Students will develop skills in reading and interpreting a contract and will thereby better understand the function of its component provisions. Students will learn how to draft contract provisions with precision and clarity. Among the topics covered will be: the structure of the contract, representations, covenants, conditions, allocation of risk, incentives, stipulative provisions, remedies, enforceability, and applicable law. The course will address the lawyer’s role in deal-making, including the negotiation of the contract’s terms and related ethical and practical aspects of transactional practice. Some attention will be devoted to characteristics of U.S. legal culture that contribute to the distinct features of its contracts.

Note: This class is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

NOTE FOR THE SUMMER 2021 SECTION: The professors will teach this course virtually via Zoom.  Students may choose to participate from the classroom or via Zoom while the professor is participating remotely.  Students who want to participate in person must be in the University’s COVID testing protocol and follow all other safety measures.

LAW 3087 v00 Fundamentals of Legal Writing I

LL.M Seminar | 3 credit hours

Fundamentals of Legal Writing is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This year-long course is designed to help prepare students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study at a law school in the United States. Specifically, through analysis of authentic legal texts, students will enhance language skills essential for producing persuasive and coherent academic legal texts. During the Fall and Spring semesters, this course will focus on writing strategies (e.g., organizational strategies, stylistic choices, and accurate production of complex grammatical structures) that are characteristic of legal texts law students likely need to produce in law school. Law review articles and other secondary sources provide the primary content for skills development. Throughout the academic year, students will work closely with course instructors and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

LAW 3089 v00 Fundamentals of Legal Writing II

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

Fundamentals of Legal Writing is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This two-semester course is an introduction to U.S. academic legal principles in writing. Through analysis of authentic legal texts (e.g., law review articles, court documents), students learn the characteristics of U.S. legal documents at the whole text, paragraph, and sentence levels. Students apply these principles to their own writing, submitting a number of papers over the course of the academic year. Students work closely with faculty to revise and edit their work and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on a pass-fail basis.

NOTE FOR THE SUMMER 2021 SECTION: The professors will teach this course virtually via Zoom.  Students may choose to participate from the classroom or via Zoom while the professor is participating remotely.  Students who want to participate in person must be in the University’s COVID testing protocol and follow all other safety measures.

LAW 2029 v00 Introduction to Torts (Two-Year Program)

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

This course will introduce students to the American law of torts. It will focus first on negligence, and explore five major areas: duty, breach of duty, scope of liability, affirmative defenses and damages. It will then use product liability law as an example of the imposition of strict tort liability.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-trained LL.M. students (i.e. those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 730 v01 Introduction to U.S. Constitutional Law

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course surveys landmark constitutional cases in their social and cultural context. The first half of the course focuses on how the U.S. Constitution affects the fundamental structure of American government. The second half of the course will focus on individual rights, with particular emphasis on equal protection and substantive due process.  Emphasis will be placed on the distinguishing features of common law method, and students will use close reading techniques to identify the defining discourse characteristics of the U.S. judicial opinion.

Note: Students who enroll in this course may not also enroll in the course Introduction to U.S. Constitutional Law.

Students in the Two-Year LL.M. Program should write an email to Marta Baffy (mlb258@georgetown.edu) by Monday, November 2 if they would like to enroll in this class. Registration opens up to all LL.M. students after November 9, 2020.

LAW 978 v00 Introduction to U.S. Legal Systems

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course introduces students to the institutions, methods, and practices at the core of the American common-law legal system. During the first half of the course we will focus on the Judicial Branch of the Government. We will examine the structure and boundaries of judicial power; the procedural mechanisms through which that power is exercised; and the ways in which common-law courts make (or decline to make) law. We will pay close attention to the political and social contexts in which the cases that we study arise, and we will consider how changing contexts affect the judicial decision-making process. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to the Legislative Branch of the Government, with special attention to problems of statutory construction. We will examine the tools—both legal and linguistic—that common-law courts employ when called upon to determine the proper interpretation of a statute.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Foundations of American Law.

Note: This course is graded honors-pass-fail and is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 978 v01 Introduction to U.S. Legal Systems

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course introduces students to the institutions, methods, and practices at the core of the American common-law legal system. During the first half of the course we will focus on the Judicial Branch of the Government. We will examine the structure and boundaries of judicial power; the procedural mechanisms through which that power is exercised; and the ways in which common-law courts make (or decline to make) law. We will pay close attention to the political and social contexts in which the cases that we study arise, and we will consider how changing contexts affect the judicial decision-making process. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to the Legislative Branch of the Government, with special attention to problems of statutory construction. We will examine the tools—both legal and linguistic—that common-law courts employ when called upon to determine the proper interpretation of a statute.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Foundations of American Law.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 721 v00 Law, Society, and Culture

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

Note: This class is restricted to students enrolled in the Two-Year (Extended) LL.M. with Certificate in Legal English for Foreign-Trained Lawyers.

LAW 3086 v00 Legal English I

LL.M Seminar | 4 credit hours

Legal English is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This two-semester course prepares students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study at a law school in the United States. The course focuses on enhancing students’ language proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with particular emphasis on developing language skills for both understanding legal texts (e.g., judicial opinions, court documents) as well as producing legal texts (e.g., case briefs, course outlines, “issue spotter” exam answers). Throughout the academic year, students work closely with faculty and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

LAW 3088 v00 Legal English II

LL.M Seminar | 2-3 credit hours

Legal English is a required course for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program. This two-semester course prepares students for the linguistic and intellectual demands of LL.M. study at a law school in the United States. The course focuses on enhancing students’ language proficiency in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with particular emphasis on developing language skills for both understanding legal texts (e.g., judicial opinions, court documents) as well as producing legal texts (e.g., case briefs, course outlines, “issue spotter” exam answers). Throughout the academic year, students work closely with faculty and receive extensive, individualized feedback on their skills development.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, to students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

NOTE FOR THE SUMMER 2021 SECTION: The professors will teach this course virtually via Zoom.  Students may choose to participate from the classroom or via Zoom while the professor is participating remotely.  Students who want to participate in person must be in the University’s COVID testing protocol and follow all other safety measures.

LAW 3116 v00 LL.M. Graduate Seminar

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

The LL.M. Graduate Seminar is an elective course designed for students who want to enhance their research and writing skills in a scholarly context. The Graduate Seminar serves two complementary goals: to introduce the student to conventional forms of academic legal argument, and to provide a workshop setting in which students can model best practices in research and writing. In the Fall semester, students will produce a research proposal (the “research abstract”). This extended research abstract is typical of the kind of document submitted as part of an S.J.D. or Ph.D. application. Students who choose to continue with the Graduate Seminar in the Spring semester will expand on their fall research abstract to complete an LL.M. thesis (roughly 40 pages).

With the help of the faculty instructor, Graduate Seminar students will independently identify a topic to write on related to their area of professional expertise and/or scholarly interest. Students will work closely with the faculty instructor who will provide individualized feedback on topic development, research process and writing for a scholarly audience, such as an admissions committee or academic editor.

LAW 3117 v00 LL.M. Graduate Seminar II

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

The LL.M. Graduate Seminar is an elective course designed for students who want to enhance their research and writing skills in a scholarly context. The Graduate Seminar serves two complementary goals: to introduce the student to conventional forms of academic legal argument, and to provide a workshop setting in which students can model best practices in research and writing. In the Fall semester, students will produce a research proposal (the “research abstract”). This extended research abstract is typical of the kind of document submitted as part of an S.J.D. or Ph.D. application. Students who choose to continue with the Graduate Seminar in the Spring semester will expand on their fall research abstract to complete an LL.M. thesis (roughly 40 pages).

With the help of the faculty instructor, Graduate Seminar students will independently identify a topic to write on related to their area of professional expertise and/or scholarly interest. Students will work closely with the faculty instructor who will provide individualized feedback on topic development, research process and writing for a scholarly audience, such as an admissions committee or academic editor.

Note: This course is restricted to students who have taken LL.M. Graduate Seminar I. Interested students should email Marta Baffy (mlb258@georgetown.edu) if they would like to enroll in this class. 

LAW 3135 v00 Multilingualism in Legal Discourse

LL.M Seminar | 1 credit hour

In this class, students will explore the role of multilinguals and multilingualism in legal discourse.  Students will do research on the topic of multilingualism in legal discourse and present their research in class.  Students will also write a series of short, one-page research reports describing the literature that they have found on various topics concerning multilingualism and the role of multilinguals in legal discourse.  At the end of the semester, students will give a 15-minute presentation in class about their research.  At various times in the semester, LLM alumni will talk with the students about their experiences as multilinguals in legal discourse.  Students will have a chance to ask questions of the guest speakers and to follow up with them on topics of mutual interest.

Note: This class is restricted to Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English students who are also enrolled in Legal English II. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

NOTE FOR THE SUMMER 2021 SECTION: This professor has committed to teaching this course from the classroom on campus.

LAW 3079 v00 Oral Communication Skills I

LL.M Seminar | 1 credit hour

Oral Communication Skills I is required for students in the Two-year LL.M. Program. This fall semester course will focus on speaking and listening skills necessary to succeed in law classes in the United States, and students will complete a variety of assignments that will help develop their oral communication skills to participate in class. At the beginning of the semester, students will be evaluated on their oral communication skills and will be provided with an individualized pronunciation plan that addresses problematic sounds and intelligibility issues unique to each student. Thereafter, class time will be spent on discourse-level skills, such as presenting, debating, negotiating, and discussing legal topics. Students will also practice listening strategies to aid in the comprehension of a variety of American English accents they will likely encounter in the U.S.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

LAW 3080 v00 Oral Communication Skills II

LL.M Seminar | 1 credit hour

Oral Communication Skills II is required for students in the Two-year LL.M. Program. This spring semester course complements Legal English II, and will focus on speaking and listening skills that legal professionals encounter in and out of the courtroom. Throughout the semester, students will study courtroom discourse and procedure. They will have the opportunity to talk with guest speakers, which may include a judge, a prosecutor, a criminal defense attorney, and/or a police officer. Students will also visit the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and the Supreme Court of the United States.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

NOTE FOR THE SUMMER 2021 SECTION: The professors will teach this course virtually via Zoom.  Students may choose to participate from the classroom or via Zoom while the professor is participating remotely.  Students who want to participate in person must be in the University’s COVID testing protocol and follow all other safety measures.

LAW 861 v00 Presentation Skills for International Lawyers

LL.M Seminar | 1 credit hour

The purpose of the course is to give to the students tools to improve their public speaking and oral presentation skills in English in a law-related context. To achieve this goal, the class will analyze how to build and deliver an effective presentation. Each student will engage in several presentation exercises, will be filmed and will receive feedback from the professor and from other students.

The expectation is that by the end of the semester, students will have reviewed and practiced key skills that support the effective preparation and delivery of informative and persuasive presentations on law-related topics. After taking this class, students should know how to adapt a topic to an audience, select information, structure and deliver a presentation, with emphasis placed on connecting with the audience.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

LAW 3115 v00 Principles of U.S. Financial Regulation

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

As the global financial system has grown increasingly sophisticated and interconnected, U.S. financial regulation also has become more complex and layered.  This course will introduce students to the foundations of the U.S. financial regulatory system and explore how regulation has developed over time. 

The course will include an overview of the structure of financial regulation in the U.S. and discuss the history and purpose of the relevant agencies’ authorities and missions.  In particular, using the most recent global financial crisis and the subsequent regulatory response as examples, the course will address the ability of the Federal financial regulators to address systemic risks. As part of this analysis, we will examine how effective financial regulation can contribute to systemic stability, consumer and investor protection, market efficiency, the prevention of financial crime, and more.  In addition, the course will consider remaining potential sources of failure in the U.S. financial regulatory system and how these weaknesses could be addressed.

Note: This class is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

NOTE FOR THE SUMMER 2021 SECTION: The professors will teach this course virtually via Zoom.  Students may choose to participate from the classroom or via Zoom while the professor is participating remotely.  Students who want to participate in person must be in the University’s COVID testing protocol and follow all other safety measures.

LAW 2026 v01 Professional Responsibility Law in the United States

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course provides a practical and practice-oriented approach to the ethical, moral, and social issues that lawyers deal with in the practice of law. The primary objectives are to prepare students to recognize ethical problems when they arise; to identify the applicable authorities – in particular the rules of professional conduct – that are most likely to bear on the matter; and to arrive at a sound resolution.  Necessary to these ends will be consideration of the ways in which the ethics rules address the often competing interests involved: those of clients, opposing parties, non-parties, the justice system as a whole, and lawyers themselves. 

Class discussions will focus primarily on the American Bar Association (ABA) Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct. Because disciplinary matters are largely the responsibility of state supreme courts, most of the cases we will discuss arise under the ethics rules adopted by individual states (which are often based on, but not always identical to, the ABA Model Rules). We will also discuss a limited number of federal cases that implicate ethical issues, including the recusal of judges and First Amendment considerations. In addition, specific attention will be focused on how to think critically within the framework of the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE).   

Although particular attention will be placed on the ABA Model Rules, MPRE and other authorities that govern the resolution of ethical issues, some attention will be paid to putting the subject in a setting that encompasses both a macroscopic view of the role of lawyers in society and a more earth-bound understanding of the processes by which the professional responsibilities of lawyers are enforced. 

LAW 989 v01 Transnational Legal Skills Workshop

LL.M Course | 1 credit hour

This is an intensive, problem based course that explores the role of law in a global context. The problem is one that involves both U.S. and non-U.S. law and forces students to examine how to be effective as lawyers in a dispute that crosses borders. Students will be broken into teams to represent “clients” and to participate in a mock negotiation, arbitration, or court hearing.

Note: Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course. A student will be permitted to drop a course that meets for the first time after the add/drop period, without a transcript notation, if a student submits a written request to the Office of the Registrar prior to the start of the second class meeting.

This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

LAW 3068 v00 Two-Year LL.M. Program Assembly

LL.M Seminar | 0 credit hours

This course gathers the full Two-Year LL.M. cohort together each week to check in and offer support workshops. Students will receive support, guidance, and academic counseling. Among the topics covered will be: research skills, career and professional development skills, and general advice about the LL.M. The course will also offer excursions to learn about American legal culture in Washington, D.C. 

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

LAW 844 v09 U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing (Two-Year Program)

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

This section of USLRAW provides a comprehensive introduction to US legal writing that is designed exclusively for students in the Two-Year LLM Program. 

In the first half of the semester, students will explore US legal discourse through a critical examination of legal resources, research methods, and analytical paradigms.  During this first half of the semester, students will meet as a large group with Legal English faculty to review language, form, and rhetorical conventions that US lawyers use in legal writing.

In the second half of the semester, students will meet in smaller groups with adjunct faculty where students will apply what they have learned in the first half of the semester.  Each student will do independent legal research and write a legal memorandum.  As part of this legal writing project, students will also meet with law librarians to learn more about legal research and citation.

Each student will submit a first draft of the memorandum, and the Legal English faculty and the adjunct faculty will provide written feedback on the first draft.  After an individual conference with a faculty member, each student will submit a final draft of the memorandum. 

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. Program.  This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. Students who enroll in this course may not enroll in any other sections of U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing.

LAW 3056 v00 U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing Workshop

LL.M Seminar | 0 credit hours

The U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing Workshop is a part of the required U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing class for students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with Certificate in Legal English. In the Workshop, students will have the opportunity to build on the assignments that they are working on in the Class. In addition to providing support for the work in the Class, the Workshop will introduce supplemental material that will help students to deepen their understanding of how U.S. lawyers create and use legal texts.

Note: This class is mandatory for, and restricted to, students enrolled in the Two-Year LL.M. with a Certificate in Legal English. This course is graded on an honors-pass-fail basis.

Craig Hoffman, J.D., Ph.D.
Director, Legal English Program
Professor of U.S. Legal Discourse

Courses taught: U.S. Legal Research, Analysis & Writing; Introduction to U.S. Legal Systems

Craig Hoffman is a linguist and a lawyer who has specialized in transactional writing and negotiating during his nine years of practice in Austin, Texas and Washington, D.C. Professor Hoffman focuses on acculturating Georgetown's foreign LL.M. students into United States Legal Discourse by teaching courses that introduce students to the ways that U.S. lawyers use language to communicate about the law. Professor Hoffman teaches classes and consults with law schools around the world on issues of language and the law. He also consults with law firms on the interpretation of statutes and contracts. Professor Hoffman has received several fellowships in linguistics, cognitive science, business, and writing. His areas of scholarship include forensic linguistics, statutory and contract interpretation, discourse analysis, and genre analysis.

Professor Hoffman received his B.A. from William & Mary, a Ph.D. in linguistics from the University of Connecticut, and a J.D. from the University of Texas.

Mari Sakai, Ph.D.
Assistant Director, Two-Year LL.M. Program
Lecturer of Legal English

Courses taught: Academic Legal English: Oral Communication Skills I; Academic Legal English: Oral Communication Skills II

Mari Sakai is a linguist who has a long and personal history with languages as she learned English, Spanish, and Japanese from her parents and relatives as a young child. Her multilingual childhood led her to a career teaching adult language learners in the college and university setting. Over the past 12 years, she has taught courses in English, Linguistics, and Education in Florida, D.C., Japan, and Cuba. Her academic and research interests include the cognitive processing of second language sounds, foreign accents, and pronunciation instruction. She is interested in how adults of all ages learn to hear and pronounce second language sounds intelligibly. Professor Sakai has published in Applied Psycholinguistics and The Journal of Second Language Pronunciation, and in 2017, she won a national award for her dissertation research. 

Professor Sakai received her B.A. in English literature and Spanish from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, an M.A. in education from the University of South Florida, and a Ph.D. in applied linguistics from Georgetown University.


Benjamin Cheng, J.D.
Lecturer of Legal English

Course taught: Academic Legal English: Torts; Academic Legal English: Criminal Procedure

Benjamin Cheng is a lawyer who has years of experience advising, mentoring, and teaching. Prior to joining the Two-Year LL.M. Program, Professor Cheng worked first in the Office of Graduate Careers, where he administered the Taxation Interview Program and advised domestic and international LL.M. students of many backgrounds. He then worked in the Office of Career Strategy, where he oversaw career advising for a 1L section. In that capacity, he also specialized in advising students from underrepresented and underserved backgrounds as well as international students from all class years. Prior to Georgetown Law, Professor Cheng worked in private practice, where he was an associate at an international law firm. Before law school, he was a strategy consultant for a consulting firm in Boston and then served as an analyst for an international investment bank in New York City.

Professor Cheng received his A.B. in biochemical sciences from Harvard University and a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School.


John Dundon, J.D.
Lecturer of Legal English

Courses taught: Contract Drafting; U.S. Legal Research, Analysis & Writing; Legal English; Introduction to U.S. Constitutional Law

John Terry Dundon is an attorney and language instructor with experience teaching both English and law in a variety of institutional contexts in the U.S. and abroad. Prior to his teaching career, Professor Dundon practiced as an attorney at the law firms of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP, Kirkland & Ellis LLP, and Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP. His practice at all three firms focused on private equity fund formation and management. Professor Dundon also served as a judicial law clerk on the District of Columbia Court of Appeals, and he maintains active bar admission in New York, the District of Columbia, and California.

Professor Dundon received a B.A. in philosophy and French from the University of Virginia, a J.D. from the George Washington University Law School, and an M.A. in applied linguistics from Columbia University.  He is currently pursuing a doctorate in sociolinguistics at Georgetown University's Linguistics Department, where his research focuses on language policy, discourse analysis, and the intersections of law and language.


Julie Lake, Ph.D.
Director of J.D. Legal English Programming
Lecturer of Legal English

Course taught: Academic Legal English: Grammar in Legal Contexts I

Julie Lake is a linguist who has worked in the Two-Year LL.M. Program and the Center for Legal English at Georgetown Law since July 2015. Professor Lake’s classroom experience includes teaching ESL for Academic Purposes at Georgetown University and the University of Maryland. She also taught conversational English to children and adults in Berlin, Germany. While in graduate school, she carried out a teaching methods course for second/foreign language teachers at Georgetown University and conducted a second language teaching methods workshop in Camaguey, Cuba. In addition to her classroom experience, she has completed classroom-based and psycholinguistic research. She has researched and published about best practices for needs analyses for instructional settings. Her dissertation research focused on reading comprehension, examining the role of individual differences in first and second language processing.

Professor Lake received her B.A. in religious studies from Oberlin College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in applied linguistics from Georgetown University.

Stephen Horowitz, J.D., M.A. TESOL
Legal English Lecturer & Director, Online Legal English Programs

Professor Stephen Horowitz is an experienced lawyer and linguist who appreciates student-centered teaching and creative ways to integrate legal and language learning. In his prior role as Director of Legal English Programs at St. John’s University School of Law (2014-19) he built St. John’s Legal English program and also enjoyed writing the St. John’s Legal English Blog and developing innovative approaches to helping LLM students improve their language and writing in preparation for the bar exam. He previously worked in the Insolvency group at Stroock & Stroock & Lavan and later went on to create the Bankruptcy Bill cartoon series. Stephen also previously taught English in Kariya City, Japan on the JET Program and subsequently spent time studying law at Waseda University in Tokyo, interning for Japanese lawyers in Tokyo and Nagoya, and teaching English to lawyers in Japan. He is an avid ultimate frisbee player and has played in tournaments all across the U.S. and around the world.

Professor Horowitz received his J.D. from Duke University School of Law, his M.A. in TESOL from CUNY-Hunter College, and his B.A. in History from the University of Pennsylvania. Students are welcome to connect with him on LinkedIn and via WeChat (@stevenwaseda).


Heather Weger, Ph.D.
Lecturer of Legal English

Courses taught: Academic Legal English: Grammar in Legal Contexts I and II

Heather Weger is a linguist who joined the Two-Year LL.M. Program at Georgetown Law in 2018. Professor Weger’s classroom experience includes over 14 years of teaching ESL for Academic Purposes at Georgetown University, as well as teaching in Germany and delivering multiple assessment-training seminars and workshops in Barranquilla, Colombia. In addition to her work in the classroom, she maintains a robust service and research platform in the wider TESOL profession. A frequent presenter at international, national, and regional TESOL and linguistics conferences, she is currently co-editor of TESOL’s AL (Applied Linguistics) Forum, and has served as Vice President of WATESOL. Professor Weger’s research platform focuses on effective teaching strategies as well as the social and co-constructed nature of language learning and language teaching.

Professor Weger received her B.A. in literary criticism from Washington University in St. Louis, an M.A. in adult and higher education from the University of Oklahoma, an M.A.T. in TESOL and bilingual education from Georgetown University, and a Ph.D. in applied linguistics from Georgetown University.