American Law for Foreign-Trained Lawyers

LAW 681 v00 Advanced Online Legal Research

LL.M Seminar | 1 credit hour

This course will build on the research techniques learned in U.S. Legal Research, Analysis, and Writing. It will focus on resources available online, including Lexis, Westlaw and the Internet. The course will prepare students to conduct U.S. legal research either in a legal setting in the United States, or abroad. There will be ample time for questions from the students, so that specific topics of interest to the class can be covered.

Note: The course is graded honors-pass-fail. This class is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree), and enrollment is limited to a small number of students.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 2062 v00 Advanced Scholarly Writing

LL.M Seminar | 1 credit hour

The goal of this course is to help you become a better and more confident writer in English. To accomplish this goal, your professor, who has an extensive background in teaching legal English and multilingual writing pedagogy, guides you through the process of writing a law seminar paper. Our method includes studying former students’ outlines, drafts, and publications to gain insight into seminar paper expectations. All course assignments map onto your seminar paper, which include: planning your paper writing process; refining your paper topic; conducting academic research; implementing legal writing strategies; drafting documents via an iterative method; gaining understanding of U.S. legal writing culture, which includes learning Bluebook citation style; revising, self-editing, and proofreading. Individual written feedback is provided throughout the course to allow you to learn from your own writing and enhance your skills as a legal English writer.

Note: This course is graded on an honors/pass/fail basis. Students enrolling in Advanced Scholarly Writing must be concurrently enrolled in a two- or three-credit seminar with a research paper requirement of at least 15 pages. To meet this co-requisite, please email Faculty Director, Professor Michelle Ueland (mmu2@georgetown.edu) by Sunday, September 5, 2021. In your message include the name and section number of the seminar that meets the co-requisite requirement. This course is only open to LL.M. students and MLT students.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 121 v08 Corporations

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

Students should note that Corporations is a prerequisite for Advanced Corporate Law, Comparative Corporate Law, Corporate Finance, Securities Regulation, Business Planning Seminar, and corporate law seminars.

This is a basic course in business corporations. Brief coverage is given to factors bearing on choice of organization, including partnership attributes, process of corporate formation, corporate privileges and powers, corporate capital structure, and limited liability. Close examination is given to the governance structure of the corporation and the fiduciary obligations of directors and officers. The particular nature of the public corporation is explored. Topics studied may include stock trading by corporate insiders, transactions in corporation control, and the procedural problems in stockholder derivative suits. Along with a focus on such policy questions as federal-state jurisdiction, the nature of the corporate governance system, and the role of the corporation in modern society, the course deals with the role of the lawyer in corporate matters.

Prof. De Amicis' course will presume familiarity with the basic vocabulary and fundamental concepts of corporate law and focus on salient divergent features of US corporate law.

Note: This section is for foreign-educated LL.M.s only. J.D. students and LL.M. students who received their law degrees in the U.S. MAY NOT register for this course.

This course does count towards the Securities and Financial Regulation specialization credits for foreign-educated attorneys.

LAW 121 v09 Corporations

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

Students should note that Corporations is a prerequisite for Advanced Corporate Law, Comparative Corporate Law, Corporate Finance, Securities Regulation, Business Planning Seminar, and corporate law seminars.

This is a basic course in business organizations with a primary focus on corporations and including a brief examination of limited liability companies. Throughout the course, students will consider the role of lawyers in corporate matters. Brief coverage is given to factors bearing on choice of organization, including process of corporate formation, corporate privileges and powers, corporate capital structure, and limited liability. Close examination is given to the governance structure of the corporation and the obligations of directors and officers. The particular nature of the public corporation is explored. Topics studied may include stock trading by corporate insiders, transactions in corporation control, the procedural problems in stockholder derivative suits, and judicial disregard of the corporate form.

Note: This section is for foreign-educated LL.M.s only. J.D. students and LL.M. students who received their law degrees in the U.S. MAY NOT register for this course.

This course does count towards the Securities and Financial Regulation specialization credits for foreign-educated attorneys.

LAW 160 v04 Drafting Contracts

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

This course introduces foreign-educated LL.M. students to the principles, processes and techniques for drafting contracts in the United States, but with a cross-border, multi-country setting. Students will develop skills in reading and interpreting a contract and will thereby better understand the function of its component provisions. Students will learn how to draft contract provisions with precision and clarity. Among the topics covered will be: the structure of the contract, representations, covenants, conditions, allocation of risk, incentives, stipulative provisions, remedies, enforceability, and applicable law. The course will address the lawyer’s role in deal-making, including the negotiation of the contract’s terms and related ethical and practical aspects of transactional practice. Some attention will be devoted to characteristics of U.S. legal culture that contribute to the distinct features of its contracts.

Note: The course is graded pass-fail. This class is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

Section 13 is FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist.

LAW 160 v06 Drafting Contracts

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

This course introduces foreign-educated LL.M. students to the principles, processes and techniques for drafting contracts in the United States, but with a cross-border, multi-country setting. Students will develop skills in reading and interpreting a contract and will thereby better understand the function of its component provisions. Students will learn how to draft contract provisions with precision and clarity. Among the topics covered will be: the structure of the contract, representations, covenants, conditions, allocation of risk, incentives, stipulative provisions, remedies, enforceability, and applicable law. The course will address the lawyer’s role in deal-making, including the negotiation of the contract’s terms and related ethical and practical aspects of transactional practice. Some attention will be devoted to characteristics of U.S. legal culture that contribute to the distinct features of its contracts.

Note: This class is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

NOTE FOR THE SUMMER 2021 SECTION: The professors will teach this course virtually via Zoom.  Students may choose to participate from the classroom or via Zoom while the professor is participating remotely.  Students who want to participate in person must be in the University’s COVID testing protocol and follow all other safety measures.

LAW 3001 v00 Evidence

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

This course provides a general survey of the rules of evidence and the reasons underlying these rules with a particular emphasis on the Federal Rules of Evidence.

Included are the subjects of relevance, examination of witnesses, privileges, expert testimony, admission and exclusion of evidence, writings, the hearsay rule and its exceptions, and scientific evidence, among other subjects relating to the regulation of proof at trials.

The course, taught by a former federal judge who was also a prosecutor, will focus on the actual problems confronted in trials when evidence is offered at those trials. The course intends to equip students with the practical working knowledge that can be used to try a case competently.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. course, Evidence.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 002 v04 Foundations of American Law

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course introduces foreign-educated LL.M. students to the basics of American law and to the special dynamics of the U.S. legal classroom before they begin a full schedule of classes in the Fall semester. Students will learn about the U.S. legal system, common law reasoning, and contemporary legal issues in the United States. This course will teach common law development and the judicial process through a study of traditional law school subjects, including criminal procedure, corporations, contracts, and constitutional law.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Introduction to U.S. Legal Systems.

Note: Note: This course is only open to foreign-trained LL.M. students who will be starting the LL.M. program in Fall 2019. This class is graded on a pass/fail basis.

LAW 2056 v00 Intensive Legal English Program

LL.M Course | credit hours

Intensive Legal English Program (no credits)


Instructors: Andrew Kerr, Julie Lake, Almas Khan


Intensive Legal English Program (non-credit) consists of a three-week intensive written and oral communication skills curriculum. The curriculum focuses on English language skills needed to succeed in the LL.M. program. Students will enhance their daily, academic and professional English skills, as well as their understanding of U.S. legal culture.


This program is limited to 20 students. The faculty has a wide range of practical and academic experience and will work closely with students in classroom instruction and individual conferences four days a week and planned excursions in the Washington, DC area one day a week. The small class size, high faculty-to-student ratio and pre- and post-program assessments will allow each student to receive individualized feedback and attention to work toward his or her professional and academic goals in the use of legal English. Upon successful completion of the program, students will receive a Certificate in Professional Legal English.

Questions: Contact the Legal English Program Director, slep@law.georgetown.edu

Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Foundations of American Law

LAW 2036 v00 Introduction to Contracts

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

This course will introduce students to a substantive area of American law: contracts. This course exposes students to the major themes in contract law. Specifically, we will cover contract formation, breach of contract, and contract remedies. Focusing exclusively on the common law, this class will familiarize students with the basic concepts of offer, acceptance, consideration, performance, breach, remedies, and third party issues.

Learning objectives:

To understand the fundamental principles of the law of contracts.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 2029 v01 Introduction to Torts

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course will introduce students to the American law of torts. It will focus on the basics of common law negligence, and explore five major areas: duty, breach of duty, scope of liability, affirmative defenses and damages. The course will also cover two other specific types of tort claims - medical malpractice and products liability - and their relationship to the negligence cause of action.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-trained LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 2029 v00 Introduction to Torts (Two-Year Program)

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

This course will introduce students to the American law of torts. It will focus first on negligence, and explore five major areas: duty, breach of duty, scope of liability, affirmative defenses and damages. It will then use product liability law as an example of the imposition of strict tort liability.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-trained LL.M. students (i.e. those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 3030 v00 Introduction to U.S. Civil Procedure

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

This course covers the major topics that arise in litigating civil cases in the federal courts of the United States. Following an introduction to the structure and process for judicial review in the federal and state courts, the readings and discussions will cover personal and subject matter jurisdiction in federal court and the litigation process (e.g. pleadings, motions practice, discovery, joinder of parties and claims, special multiparty litigation, etc.), related statutory requirements and provisions, scope of litigation issues, problems of mixed federal and state law claims, what law applies in federal court, the right to a jury trial and the preclusion doctrines (claim/issue). The course also provides a general overview of the appellate process.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. course, Civil Procedure.

Note: Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 730 v00 Introduction to U.S. Constitutional Law

LL.M Course | 2-3 credit hours

This course provides an overview of the major constitutional cases over the last 200 years. The first half of the course focuses on how the Constitution affects the fundamental structure of American government. Particular attention will be paid to the critical balances of power between the Federal and state governments (federalism) and among the three branches of the Federal government. The rest of the course will focus on individual rights, with particular emphasis on individual rights in the areas of equal protection, and substantive due process.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

For the Fall sections, FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. 

LAW 730 v04 Introduction to U.S. Constitutional Law

LL.M Course | 3 credit hours

The United States Constitution is the basic charter between the American people and their national government. This course will introduce you to some of the foundational legal concepts and questions surrounding that document. We will examine those concepts and questions primarily by reading decisions of the United States Supreme Court that interpret and apply the Constitution.   

In the first part of the course, we will focus on the Constitution’s provisions that create the structure of the federal government. We will learn how those provisions divide power between the federal and state governments and separate the powers granted to the federal government among its three branches. We will also examine the scope of the powers granted to the President and Congress. 

In the second portion of the course, we will study the Constitution’s protections for individual rights. The focus of that study will be the guarantees of equal protection, due process, freedom of speech, and freedom of religion found in the First and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

For the Fall sections, FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. 

LAW 978 v00 Introduction to U.S. Legal Systems

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course introduces students to the institutions, methods, and practices at the core of the American common-law legal system. During the first half of the course we will focus on the Judicial Branch of the Government. We will examine the structure and boundaries of judicial power; the procedural mechanisms through which that power is exercised; and the ways in which common-law courts make (or decline to make) law. We will pay close attention to the political and social contexts in which the cases that we study arise, and we will consider how changing contexts affect the judicial decision-making process. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to the Legislative Branch of the Government, with special attention to problems of statutory construction. We will examine the tools—both legal and linguistic—that common-law courts employ when called upon to determine the proper interpretation of a statute.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Foundations of American Law.

Note: This course is graded honors-pass-fail and is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 978 v01 Introduction to U.S. Legal Systems

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course introduces students to the institutions, methods, and practices at the core of the American common-law legal system. During the first half of the course we will focus on the Judicial Branch of the Government. We will examine the structure and boundaries of judicial power; the procedural mechanisms through which that power is exercised; and the ways in which common-law courts make (or decline to make) law. We will pay close attention to the political and social contexts in which the cases that we study arise, and we will consider how changing contexts affect the judicial decision-making process. During the second half of the course, we will turn our attention to the Legislative Branch of the Government, with special attention to problems of statutory construction. We will examine the tools—both legal and linguistic—that common-law courts employ when called upon to determine the proper interpretation of a statute.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and Foundations of American Law.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 987 v00 LAWA Graduate Seminar

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

This seminar, for graduate fellows in the Leadership and Advocacy for Women in Africa (LAWA) Program, provides students with the opportunity to enhance their legal research and writing skills in connection with a major research paper to be finalized in the spring semester. Each student focuses on a specific women's human rights issue within that student's country of origin, analyzes the domestic legal framework in light of international human rights standards, and proposes recommendations for both legal and other types of remedies using international and regional human rights mechanisms. The students begin with a topic, and from there develop a topic statement, a thesis, a thesis statement, a skeletal and detailed outline and an introduction to their paper. Students undertake intensive research into their theses, and also develop a bibliography. This class lays the groundwork for students to write a major legal research paper during the spring semester.

Note: Enrollment in this course is limited to LAWA Fellows.

LAW 2060 v00 LAWA Graduate Seminar II

LL.M Seminar | 3 credit hours

Students will produce a substantive paper comprising not less than 40 pages, addressing a current violation of African women’s human rights, and including innovative and practical solutions targeted to the various branches of government, civil society, and individual women. Students will develop their theses in consideration of the social, religious, cultural and economic conditions of the country or countries addressed. The first half of the course will examine comparative women’s human rights on the specific topics selected by the students during LAWA Seminar I. The second half of the course will be dedicated to the oral presentation of research papers and discussion of these paper topics, including preparation for presentations before both USAID and Congressional staff. This course is open only to Fellows in the Leadership and Advocacy for Women in Africa Program.

Note: Enrollment in this course is limited to LAWA Fellows.

LAW 2075 v01 Negotiations Seminar (LLM - Week One)

LL.M Seminar | 3 credit hours

This interactive seminar is designed to teach both the theory and practice of negotiation. The goal is to improve students’ understanding of negotiation as well as their ability to negotiate effectively. Students will spend much of their time participating in negotiation exercises and simulations from a variety of practice areas. Through the in-class negotiation exercises, debriefings, and lectures, students will develop and sharpen skills in the areas of listening, asking questions, creative thinking, and persuasive communication. Class lectures and discussions will focus on such topics as the difference between competitive and integrative bargaining, the ethical dimensions of negotiations, the importance of reputations, and the value in planning and choosing negotiation strategies.
The seminar will meet during Week One (Monday - Friday). Attendance at all sessions is mandatory. The class sessions are designed to provide an environment that is conducive for all students to experiment with different negotiation skills and behaviors. Students are not graded on the outcomes or results of negotiations, but on commitment to the materials and exercises. 

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the Negotiations and Mediation Seminar; the Negotiations Seminar; or Negotiation and Mediation in Public Interest Law Settings or Negotiations and Drafting Seminar or Contracts: Structure and Negotiations.

Note: WEEK ONE COURSE. This seminar will meet for one week only on the following days: Monday, January 11, 2021 through Thursday, January 14, 2021, and Saturday, January 16, 2021, 9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

There is a course materials fee for this course, which covers outside vendor materials purchased on behalf of all enrolled students (these materials are distributed as part of the course’s in-class assignments and exercises). This fee is posted to your student account in August (for Fall courses) or December (for Spring courses), or as soon as you are enrolled in the course, whichever is later. Students who drop the course will be refunded the amount. Students approved to withdraw will not be refunded.

This course is graded pass-fail and is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 682 v01 Presentation Skills for Lawyers Seminar (International LL.M.)

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

This seminar focuses on the communication skills lawyers are required to master. The seminar includes work on the preparation and presentation of informational briefings and persuasive speeches to both expert and lay audiences, from a listening perspective. The seminar does not address trial or appellate advocacy skills. In addition to lecture/discussions of the principles and techniques, students deliver presentations which are video-recorded, analyzed and critiqued by the seminar participants and the professor.

Learning objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will have an understanding of and enhanced professional skill in creating and presenting listenable presentations.

Note: This class is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree). This course is graded on a pass/fail basis.

LAW 2026 v00 Professional Responsibility Law in the United States

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course provides a practical and practice-oriented approach to the ethical, moral, and social issues that lawyers deal with in the practice of law. The primary objectives are to prepare students to recognize ethical problems when they arise; identify the applicable authorities – in particular the rules of professional conduct – that are most likely to bear on the matter; and arrive at a sound resolution. Necessary to these ends will be consideration of the ways in which the ethics rules address the often competing interests of clients, opposing parties, non-parties, the justice system as a whole, and lawyers themselves. 

Class discussions will focus primarily on the American Bar Association (ABA) Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct. Because disciplinary matters are largely the responsibility of state supreme courts, most of the cases we will discuss arise under the ethics rules adopted by individual states (which are often based on, but not always identical to, the ABA Model Rules). We will also discuss a limited number of federal cases that implicate ethical issues, including the recusal of judges and First Amendment considerations.

Although particular attention will be placed on the ABA Model Rules and other authorities that govern the resolution of ethical issues, some attention will be paid to putting the subject in a setting that encompasses both a macroscopic view of the role of lawyers in society and a more earth-bound understanding of the processes by which the professional responsibilities of lawyers are enforced. 

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree). The summer section of this course is graded on a pass-fail basis. The fall and spring sections of this course are graded on an honors-pass-fail basis. There will be a scheduled take-home exam, date TBA. 

LAW 2026 v01 Professional Responsibility Law in the United States

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

This course provides a practical and practice-oriented approach to the ethical, moral, and social issues that lawyers deal with in the practice of law. The primary objectives are to prepare students to recognize ethical problems when they arise; to identify the applicable authorities – in particular the rules of professional conduct – that are most likely to bear on the matter; and to arrive at a sound resolution.  Necessary to these ends will be consideration of the ways in which the ethics rules address the often competing interests involved: those of clients, opposing parties, non-parties, the justice system as a whole, and lawyers themselves. 

Class discussions will focus primarily on the American Bar Association (ABA) Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the ABA Model Code of Judicial Conduct. Because disciplinary matters are largely the responsibility of state supreme courts, most of the cases we will discuss arise under the ethics rules adopted by individual states (which are often based on, but not always identical to, the ABA Model Rules). We will also discuss a limited number of federal cases that implicate ethical issues, including the recusal of judges and First Amendment considerations. In addition, specific attention will be focused on how to think critically within the framework of the Multistate Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE).   

Although particular attention will be placed on the ABA Model Rules, MPRE and other authorities that govern the resolution of ethical issues, some attention will be paid to putting the subject in a setting that encompasses both a macroscopic view of the role of lawyers in society and a more earth-bound understanding of the processes by which the professional responsibilities of lawyers are enforced. 

LAW 3055 v00 Scholarly Writing: African Women's Human Rights Issues

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

This course introduces students to scholarly legal writing, focusing on African women’s human rights topics. Students will be introduced to legal research techniques for selecting and narrowing their topics. These strategies will help students to develop a "kernel," which is a well-researched and well-written 10-page background section of their thesis. In addition to regular class meetings to discuss research strategies, outlining techniques, organization tools, use of footnotes for authority and attribution, and audience expectations, students will meet with the professor to discuss the progress of their writing. Students will receive written feedback from the professor on each submission. Students will be required to research and write at least 10 pages combining scholarship with their original thoughts or experiences on their topics. At least two drafts must be submitted and revised during the course to receive a passing grade.

Prerequisite: Foundations of American Law.

Note: This course is graded pass-fail. During Summer 2021, this course is restricted to the Leadership and Advocacy for Women from Africa (LAWA) fellowship students. Attendance is mandatory at all class sessions.

LAW 3070 v00 The United States Constitution: A Historical Perspective

LL.M Course | 1 credit hour

This course will provide students with a historical framework for understanding how the United States Constitution reached its current form. Students will focus on the ways in which political processes and social forces impacted constitutional developments in the United States. Constitutional norms will be covered in passing, while the primary focus will be on events unfolding in American society as the legal concepts came into existence. 

The course is designed for foreign-trained LL.M. students and will provide participants with a conceptual framework for better understanding Constitutional Law I. 

Note: The course is graded pass-fail and is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY AT ALL CLASS SESSIONS. Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist. All enrolled students must attend each class session in its entirety. Failure to attend the first class session in its entirety will result in a drop; failure to attend any subsequent class session in its entirety will result in a withdrawal.

Enrolled students will have until the beginning of the second class session to request a drop by contacting the Office of the Registrar; a student who no longer wishes to remain enrolled after the second class session begins will not be permitted to drop the class but may request a withdrawal from an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Affairs. Withdrawals are permitted up until the last class for this specific course.

LAW 2039 v00 U.S. Criminal Procedure

LL.M Course | 2 credit hours

An examination of the basic Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendment principles that govern the interaction of the police and suspects in the investigation of crime. From stop and frisks to coerced confessions, the course will examine the constitutional doctrines developed to regulate police behavior and the admissibility of evidence. The core concepts will include the definition of a “search,” the meaning of probable cause and reasonable suspicion, the requirement of a search warrant and the many exceptions to the warrant requirement, Miranda and related limits on interrogation, and the pre-trial right to counsel. The course will also focus on the role of the courts in enforcing the constitutional guarantees, particularly through the exclusionary rule.

Note: This course is only open to foreign-educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

FIRST CLASS ATTENDANCE IS MANDATORY.  Enrolled students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain enrolled. Waitlisted students must be in attendance at the start of the first class session in order to remain eligible to be admitted off the waitlist.

LAW 763 v00 U.S. Income Tax: Policies and Practices

LL.M Course | 4 credit hours

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the U.S. income tax for foreign graduate students.

In the United States, the income tax is not just the principal means of financing government. Sooner or later, nearly every legal problem, no matter what the subject, raises an income tax issue. Whether the legal matter involves environmental regulation, corporate governance, or criminal behavior, money is likely to change hands, and the parties will need to know how the income tax treats the payment and receipt of the money.

Although the reading includes judicial opinions, statutory provisions, and regulatory decisions, its primary goal is to teach the deeper structure, or what might be called the conceptual or theoretical map, which underlies the federal income tax. Not even the most knowledgeable tax lawyer knows more than a tiny fraction of the thousands and thousands of details of the U.S. income tax law. Fortunately, lurking beneath the mass of technical detail is a deeper structure, a conceptual or theoretical map, which enables the practitioner to spot problems and identify issues even before the actual legal research begins. The principal objective of this course is to convey that conceptual or theoretical map.

A second objective of these materials is to place the tax law in a broader social and economic context. The tax law has an enormous impact, pervading every sphere of public and even private life. It may be a major cause of America’s reliance on private automobiles, rather than mass transit, for transportation and on single-family dwellings, rather than apartment buildings, for housing. It may also affect a couple’s decision to marry or have children. To study the tax law, then, can be to examine the basic value choices that Americans have made.

Being so pervasive, taxation is naturally an intensely political subject. A myriad of groups lobby the U.S. Congress to amend the tax laws to serve their particular, and often conflicting, interests. The degree to which one group succeeds, rather than another, reflects the distribution of political power.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students may not receive credit for both this course and the J.D. course, Federal Income Taxation (formerly Taxation I).

Note: This course is required for and limited to foreign-trained students pursuing the LL.M. in Taxation.

The midterm for the course will be on Tuesday, October 9, 2018.
(Monday classes meet instead of Tuesday classes on October 9th, 2018.)

LAW 844 v06 U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

Introduces students to U.S. legal resources, research methods, and analytical paradigms. Writing assignments give students the opportunity to develop written analysis using the approaches, forms, and conventions common in U.S. law. Students will write a series of documents that are related to their representation of a client in the context of a U.S. law firm. Students will analyze the client's legal position, perform individual legal research on the related law, and write a legal memorandum that will address the client's concerns. Students will also give oral presentations of their research findings. Students will receive individual feedback on both written and oral work.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students who enroll in this course may not enroll in any other sections of U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing (formerly: U.S. Legal Discourse I and II).

Note: The course is graded honors-pass-fail and is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree). Enrollment is limited to a small number of students.

LAW 844 v07 U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

This class will introduce students to U.S. legal resources, research methods, and analytical paradigms, and will give students the opportunity to develop written analysis using the approaches, forms, and conventions common in U.S. law. Students will write a series of documents that are related to their representation of a client in their context of a U.S. law firm, and will give oral presentations of their research findings. Students will receive individual feedback on both written and oral work.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students who enroll in this course may not enroll in any other sections of U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing (formerly: U.S. Legal Discourse I and II).

Note: The course is graded honors-pass-fail and is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree).

LAW 844 v02 U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing (Tax Program)

LL.M Seminar | 2 credit hours

Students will write a series of documents that are related to their representation of a client in the context of a U.S. law firm. Students will analyze the client's legal position, perform individual legal research on the related law, and write a legal memorandum that will address the client's concerns. Students will also give oral presentations of their research findings. Students will receive individual feedback on both written and oral work.

Mutually Excluded Courses: Students who enroll in this course may not enroll in any other U.S. Legal Research Analysis & Writing.

Note: This section is for foreign-trained students pursuing an LL.M. in Taxation only. The course is graded honors-pass-fail and is only open to foreign educated LL.M. students (i.e., those students who do not have a U.S. J.D. degree). Enrollment is limited to a small number of students.